Anti-sieze on lug nuts?? - Jeep Wrangler Forum
Jeep Wrangler Forum

Go Back   Jeep Wrangler Forum > TJ Jeep Wrangler Forum > TJ Tech Forum

Join Wrangler Forum Today


Reply
 
Thread Tools

Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about them on WranglerForum.com
Old 11-14-2010, 09:16 AM   #1
Jeeper
 
HyperBuzzin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Western PA
Posts: 642
Anti-sieze on lug nuts??

What's your opinion on using anti seize on lug nuts?
With PA winter road crews playing hell on anything steel and not protected, I'm thinking of using it.
Wheeling doesn't help keep the lug nuts clean either, so maybe year round protection too.

__________________
'04 TJ Unlimited (The Original Unlimited!!)
2.25"BB, 32" M/T's & Super Swampers for off-road
Where we're goin', we don't need no stinkin' roads!!
HyperBuzzin is offline   Quote
Old 11-14-2010, 09:20 AM   #2
Jeeper
 
nytmar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Illinois
Posts: 50
Never!

nytmar is offline   Quote
Old 11-14-2010, 09:31 AM   #3
Jeeper
 
compshooter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: 29 Palms, Ca
Posts: 407
Quote:
Originally Posted by nytmar View Post
Never!
Disagree, to a point. When I lived in the south, and played in the mud, had the same problem. Lug nuts have a tendency to bond with the lug stud. I used a dab of white lithium grease on the studs before putting the lug nut back on. Never had one loosen on me, and never had to fight to get one off either once I began using the grease. Using actual anti-seize, don't know, but grease works great with no adverse affects.

Just my thoughts...
__________________
99 SE with less than 43K on the clock and a few mods......
compshooter is offline   Quote
Old 11-14-2010, 09:57 AM   #4
Jeeper
 
Atthehop's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: NW, NJ
Posts: 3,966
Quote:
Originally Posted by nytmar View Post
Never!
Why not.
__________________
Retired my 94 YJ 4cyl 5spd @ 200K
Now in a 04 TJ 4cyl 5spd CV @120K+
Both as a commuter vehicle in NW, NJ
April 2012.downsized and now a 99er.
Atthehop is offline   Quote
Old 11-14-2010, 10:49 AM   #5
Jeeper
 
nytmar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Illinois
Posts: 50
The lug nuts are supposed to be torqued dry. Just make sure the wheel studs are clean and dry. If you rotate your wheels regularly then the lugs shouldn't seize up. i never had a problem with them seizing and if they did i have an air impact that will remove it.
nytmar is offline   Quote
Old 11-14-2010, 10:53 AM   #6
Jeeper
 
IndyJeepMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Indianapolis
Posts: 3,387
I do it, I have no problem with them ever. I dont have a nice air compressor so I do everything by hand. And it makes it pretty nice.
__________________
1980 CJ7
3.9L Cummins POWER!
Follow my build, its cool and stuff: http://www.wranglerforum.com/f118/project-shake-n-bake-a-cummins-cj-188515.html]
IndyJeepMan is offline   Quote
Old 11-14-2010, 11:01 AM   #7
Jeeper
 
TJeepman's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Nova Scotia
Posts: 676
It's generally recommended that lubricant not be used on lug nuts as the specified torque of 90 to 100 ft.lbs. is based on no lubrication. Check your Owner Manual for the actual specified torque.

Lubrication will reduce friction at the threads as well as the interface between the lug nut and the wheel, resulting in more torque being applied to the stud, lug nut and the assembly.

I usually use a light lubricant and back off the torque by 5 to 10 ft.lbs.

Antiseize - maybe; synthetic high temperature disc brake lubricant - maybe; WD-40 - maybe; Rust Check Coat and Protect - yes.
__________________
2003 Jeep TJ Sport - 4.0L - 251,430 kms
2002 and 2007 Grand Caravans - Sport & SXT
TJeepman is offline   Quote
Old 11-14-2010, 11:03 AM   #8
Knows a couple things...

WF Supporting Member
 
Jerry Bransford's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Escondido, Calif.
Posts: 34,475
Images: 2
Having had too many seized lug nuts over the years, I never install lug nuts without using antiseize on the threads. It's good stuff for lug nuts, tie rod threads and tie rod ends, track bar adjustment link, etc.. Since using antiseize, I have had no more seized lug nuts or any other related problems including galling that is common when dissimilar metals are threaded together as can happen with some lug nuts.

Just remember that if you apply antiseize to the threads, that you also must reduce the torque setting by approximately 30% to avoid over tightening the lug nuts. So if you tighten your lug nuts to 100 ft-lbs. without antiseize, the appropriate tightness with antiseize will be about 70 ft-lbs. to achieve the same clamping force and stress on the lug nut studs.
__________________
When you have a choice, buy American.

Jerry Bransford is online now   Quote
Old 11-14-2010, 11:04 AM   #9
Jeeper

WF Supporting Member
 
firehawk_1989's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Davenport, IA
Posts: 4,241
I agree, you should not use it on your lugs. TJeep gives a pretty good explanation of why not.
firehawk_1989 is offline   Quote
Old 11-14-2010, 11:11 AM   #10
Jeeper
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 2,473
Always use some kind of lube. Anti-seize is great, it doesn't wash off like oils can. Just try to get it off your fingers!

If the threads are rusty or dirty, it's possible to hog down on a fastener to the torque specs or even beyond, without the surfaces to be clamped even touching!
Lube helps to overcome the turning resistance so the fastener can do what's it's designed for.

Torque specs measure the turning force in order to get the clamping force correct. But anything that increases the turning force reduces the clamping force - and fools you. That's why modern technology measures fastener stretch rather than turning force.

The rule - NEVER put a fastener on dry - thread locker, sealer, or lube.

Torque specs called out are for NEW, not used, clean, and lubed lug nuts.

LOL Picture this - put a rusty stud in a vise, screw a rusty lug nut on it till in binds, but meets torque specs. Does that mean the wheels will be tight?
rrich is offline   Quote
Old 11-14-2010, 11:38 AM   #11
Jeeper
 
Loic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: LAS VEGAS
Posts: 794
after breaking one last time i took my wheel off, i put a little grease on them. no problems with them so far.
Loic is offline   Quote
Old 11-14-2010, 11:54 AM   #12
Jeeper
 
TJ Terry's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 135
Every thing i own has antisieze on the lug nuts, never had any problems with them coming loose. At the shop i work in everything gets oil put on them. I personaly go through a can of antisieze faster than i go through underware.
__________________
TJ Terry is offline   Quote
Old 11-14-2010, 01:14 PM   #13
Jeeper
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Cornjerker Country
Posts: 267
I have used Antisieze on lug nuts for DECADES without any ill effects.

While it may be tough to wash off your fingers, it is one of the best products in the automotive world in my opinion!
Elwood is offline   Quote
Old 11-14-2010, 01:32 PM   #14
Jeeper
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 2,473
Missed the point?

The reason I mentioned it's hard to wash off your fingers is it doesn't wash off as easy as oils do, leaving the studs unprotected.
rrich is offline   Quote
Old 11-14-2010, 01:39 PM   #15
Jeeper
 
edman87k5's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 64
I have put anti sieze on every lugnut I have owned since I was in high school. (thats at least 15 vehicles) Never a problem and never a stuck lugnut.
Also, a lot of times, I will put a thin smear on the hub face. You know why if you have ever had rims stick to the hub face and have to wail on them to get them off.
edman87k5 is offline   Quote
Old 11-14-2010, 04:56 PM   #16
Jeeper
 
HyperBuzzin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Western PA
Posts: 642
Quote:
Originally Posted by firehawk_1989 View Post
I agree, you should not use it on your lugs. TJeep gives a pretty good explanation of why not.
But he does use lube. Maybe not anti seize, but still a lube.

I have the anti seize as well as white lithium grease. Maybe I'll try one on one side and the other on the opposite side and see which seems to work better.
Just gotta remember to drop the torque.
Thanks all.
__________________
'04 TJ Unlimited (The Original Unlimited!!)
2.25"BB, 32" M/T's & Super Swampers for off-road
Where we're goin', we don't need no stinkin' roads!!
HyperBuzzin is offline   Quote
Old 11-14-2010, 04:58 PM   #17
Jeeper
 
neverfastenough1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Savannah, Ga
Posts: 925
Hmmm, man antiseize has been around for decades? I've never used it on anything besides sparkplugs, and in 29 years I have never had a problem getting a lugnut off. Maybe its because I am not a girl (not saying there aren't girls out there that wouldn't have a problem either, yuk). After saying that, I do believe it won't hurt at all to use it. We do use it on threads of the pins that hold the blades on the helicopter I work on. That is however the only threads we use it on. Other places we use oil for the sole purpose of lowering the friction torque of self locking nuts. There are different kinds of antiseize, and if you use the wrong kinds on the wrong metals, you will create corrosion. Different ones have different metals in them. Can't say I have ever whipped out my torque wrench to torque lugnuts either. If it was that critical, I know there is a torque, they wouldn't give you a lugwrench to change a tire with, they would give you a torque wrench.
neverfastenough1 is offline   Quote
Old 11-14-2010, 05:09 PM   #18
Jeeper
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Cornjerker Country
Posts: 267
Rich, I was just joking about the washing thing. It is just good stuff.
Elwood is offline   Quote
Old 11-14-2010, 05:42 PM   #19
Newb
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: South St. Louis area
Posts: 3
Always used antisieze

I've been using it on all my vehicles lugnuts for 20 years never a problem. Started doing it after breaking off a few studs on my 78 pickup trying to bust them loose after a long winter of salt and mud.
darkruby06 is offline   Quote
Old 11-14-2010, 05:48 PM   #20
Knows a couple things...

WF Supporting Member
 
Jerry Bransford's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Escondido, Calif.
Posts: 34,475
Images: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by neverfastenough1 View Post
Hmmm, man antiseize has been around for decades? I've never used it on anything besides sparkplugs, and in 29 years I have never had a problem getting a lugnut off. Maybe its because I am not a girl (not saying there aren't girls out there that wouldn't have a problem either, yuk).
That you haven't had a problem means nothing and that you imply those of us who have are "girls" is showing just a bit of an attitude. I had to twist off 5 seized lug nuts on a Rubicon I purchased back in May which snapped the studs off in doing so. Considering my larger alloy axle shafts, larger bolt pattern, and larger stud sizes they use, it was a PITA to replace the studs which would not have happened had the previous owner just used a bit of antiseize on the threads. There was evidence of galling which caused the lug nuts to seize. I guess I must be a girly guy to have had a problem getting those lug nuts off. And in 47 years of driving and working on my vehicles, I have seen the issue off and on over the years. Perhaps when you have more experience than merely 29 years you might have seen it.
__________________
When you have a choice, buy American.

Jerry Bransford is online now   Quote
Old 11-14-2010, 06:34 PM   #21
Jeeper
 
neverfastenough1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Savannah, Ga
Posts: 925
I don't exactly know how many years it takes to be experienced at taking a wheel off. You are right though, I could break one in a year or 15 more. All I can go by, which is the same for you, is the amount of time I have been doing it. I am looking at a computer screen. I don't know who is a girl and who is not. The "I am not a girl comment" meant that a girl might have a problem doing it. There are a few other groups that would probably have problems, but they would get offended, unlike most girls, so I did not mention them. Sorry if I offended you.
neverfastenough1 is offline   Quote
Old 11-14-2010, 06:45 PM   #22
Jeeper
 
edman87k5's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 64
Yes, it is not because I am a wimp, I use an impact 98% of the time anyway, it is to prevent the lugnuts from siezing and having to break and replace the lug. I have had several break off and it really sucks!
This mainly pertains to older vehicles, which is mostly what I play with. A lot of times it will be years before I have to remove a wheel so the never seize is a must.
edman87k5 is offline   Quote
Old 11-14-2010, 06:58 PM   #23
Jeeper
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by neverfastenough1 View Post
Hmmm, man antiseize has been around for decades? I've never used it on anything besides sparkplugs, and in 29 years I have never had a problem getting a lugnut off. Maybe its because I am not a girl (not saying there aren't girls out there that wouldn't have a problem either, yuk). After saying that, I do believe it won't hurt at all to use it. We do use it on threads of the pins that hold the blades on the helicopter I work on. That is however the only threads we use it on. Other places we use oil for the sole purpose of lowering the friction torque of self locking nuts. There are different kinds of antiseize, and if you use the wrong kinds on the wrong metals, you will create corrosion. Different ones have different metals in them. Can't say I have ever whipped out my torque wrench to torque lugnuts either. If it was that critical, I know there is a torque, they wouldn't give you a lugwrench to change a tire with, they would give you a torque wrench.



Doesn't matter how strong you are, if you apply enough pressure it will either break or come off it's that simple. I just snapped 4 shock bolts on the rear of my 06 TJ, so if I wasn't a girly man they would have magically come off instead of breaking? Don't be an a$$ you don't know what your talking about. Good for you, you have never had a problem consider yourself lucky. Having 29 years exp. should have taught you that just because you have been lucky doesn't mean the same goes for everyone and everything. It also depends on where you live, I live in New england (rust belt) and everything that's metal rusts and welds itself in a matter of months.
ohsixteejay is offline   Quote
Old 11-14-2010, 08:18 PM   #24
Jeeper
 
RubiCobra's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Tucson AZ
Posts: 658
Interesting. I'd never thought of using anti seize on wheel studs. I have, however, twisted off 2 studs in my day due to seized lug nuts. If you use a torque wrench, torque them to 70 lbs and check them every once in a while, it seems like a good idea to me.
RubiCobra is offline   Quote
Old 11-14-2010, 09:20 PM   #25
Jeeper
 
HyperBuzzin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Western PA
Posts: 642
I wasn't wondering as much for stuck/seized lugs, as much as them just being tough to remove, mostly from trail dirt and/or road grime and at this time of the year, salt.

Can't say I've ever broke a lug (just jinxed myself?) but don't wanna ruin the lug nuts or lugs due to excessive wear/corrosion.
__________________
'04 TJ Unlimited (The Original Unlimited!!)
2.25"BB, 32" M/T's & Super Swampers for off-road
Where we're goin', we don't need no stinkin' roads!!
HyperBuzzin is offline   Quote
Old 11-14-2010, 09:34 PM   #26
Jeeper
 
TJeepman's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Nova Scotia
Posts: 676
Heard mention here of anti seize on spark plugs. Spark plugs and orygen sensors have an anti seize of some sort on them from the Factory these days. It may say on oxygen sensor for example, not to use any anti sieze. Anti seize compound around either spark plugs or oxygen sensors can be bad news if it gets where it shouldn't.
Here's what NGK has to say at this site.
Quote:
Issue: Applying anti-seize to the threads of spark plugs that have a special metal plating thus allowing the installer to mistakenly over-torque the spark plug in the cylinder head. Over-torque stretches the metal between the last thread and the seal between the cylinder head and spark plug, causing a much higher probability that the spark plug will either break during installation or upon removal.
Go to this site for the Champion Spark Plug Handbook.
Quote:
Here are a couple of tips to help assure the success of changing spark plugs. The first is to remove spark plugs from aluminum cylinder heads only when the engine is cool. Since aluminum and steel expand and contract at different rates, removing spark plugs from an aluminum cylinder head while hot can actually cause thread and cylinder head damage. Before installing the spark plugs, make sure the threads are clean and in good condition. If in doubt, run a thread chaser through the plug opening in the cylinder head. Champion recommends that you do not use an anti-seize compound, since one has already been applied to the plugs at the factory.

__________________
2003 Jeep TJ Sport - 4.0L - 251,430 kms
2002 and 2007 Grand Caravans - Sport & SXT
TJeepman is offline   Quote
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Lug Nuts greese JK General Discussion Forum 6 10-27-2010 02:47 PM
cant get off anti theft nuts chara42 TJ Tech Forum 9 10-15-2010 12:27 PM
Frame Tie in Nuts Vaultzz YJ Tech Forum 2 04-24-2010 10:13 PM
anti sway bar??? wasurfer86 TJ Tech Forum 14 01-09-2010 05:56 PM
Nuts? popa TJ Tech Forum 1 12-11-2009 04:08 PM



Download our Mobile App

» Network Links
»Jeep Parts
» Featured Product

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:24 PM.



Jeep®, Wrangler, Liberty, Wagoneer, Cherokee, and Grand Cherokee are copyrighted and trademarked to Chrysler Motors LLC.
Wranglerforum.com is not in any way associated with the Chrysler Motors LLC