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Old 04-04-2014, 08:48 PM   #1
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Brake line routing

98 TJ Sport. The brake line to the front right caliper goes from the master cylinder to the front bumper, along the inside edge of the bumper, then back to the caliper. I bought a 25' coil of tubing and am considering going from the master cylinder back to the firewall, above the transmission and behind the head, to the front right caliper. Can anybody think of a reason why I should not run the line on that path?

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Old 04-04-2014, 10:51 PM   #2
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The only disadvantage I could think about is that you may will have a hard time to bleed it. Since you will create the highest point in the line above the tranny. That's something you usually want to avoid and might be the reason why they routed in the front.

Matt

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Old 04-05-2014, 01:55 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Matthias_TJ View Post
The only disadvantage I could think about is that you may will have a hard time to bleed it. Since you will create the highest point in the line above the tranny. That's something you usually want to avoid and might be the reason why they routed in the front. Matt
Would heat have any effects on it as well? Or is the PITA factor enough? Lol
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Old 04-05-2014, 08:50 AM   #4
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Good point re: bleeding. I'm pretty sure I can run the entire line below the master cylinder. Re: heat - that is something that really is an X factor. I don't know how much heat is back there and if it would impact the fluid. It's possible. I can always wrap the line with heat shielding. May do so just for good measure.

I also think that the Jeep engineers routed it the way they did for a reason. I just can't figure out why. The only thing I can think of is maybe heat, and sequence of assembly. It takes 130" of tubing to replace that line. Going behind the engine would take half that and would probably be easier.
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Old 04-05-2014, 09:00 AM   #5
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It seems I was not the only one asking this question.

Replacing Brake Lines
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Old 04-05-2014, 09:45 PM   #6
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Just curious as to why you would want to re-route a line that is perfectly routed already? It's not like adding a lift or something, you would get zero benefit from doing so.
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Old 04-07-2014, 09:14 AM   #7
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Perfectly routed? I disagree. The line is exposed in the front. In addition, it runs along the frame rail and is covered by the fender liner, trapping moisture and promoting corrosion. This is exactly where my line failed.
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Old 04-07-2014, 10:42 AM   #8
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For what my opinion may be worth, I truly believe that the Jeep engineers routed the brake line along the frame rails to avoid heat from the engine. Although corrosion may be a trade-off (that takes at least ten years to rust out a brake line), it avoids the problem of heat coming off the engine and hitting a brake line running alongside the firewall could easily overheat the fluid and degrade braking performance.

Believe me, if Jeep could have safely found a way to use less brake line and save some costs on the production line, they would have routed that line more directly. I agree that it is a PITA to re-run that brake line along its original track (I did this with a SS preformed line), but it works as it should, so I would advise to stick with the original routing.
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Old 04-07-2014, 01:18 PM   #9
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This is what I am trying to understand. Jeep routed the line the way they did for a reason that evades me. I don't see how running behind the engine would expose the line to higher temeratures than running next to the exhaust headers. Also, I could wrap the line in this:

JEGS Thermal Heat Sleeving - Free Shipping on All Orders @ JEGS
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Old 04-07-2014, 01:33 PM   #10
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This is what I am trying to understand. Jeep routed the line the way they did for a reason that evades me. I don't see how running behind the engine would expose the line to higher temeratures than running next to the exhaust headers. Also, I could wrap the line in this:

JEGS Thermal Heat Sleeving - Free Shipping on All Orders @ JEGS
Heat wrap is a band aid solution that the engineers probably dismissed at the outset. They were using a metal line that acts like a heat sink. Too near the engine on a firewall or otherwise and the DOT3 or even 4 fluid will get real hot, real fast. On a Wrangler, that area between the firewall and back on the engine has poor air circulation and gets very hot, especially in the summer. Not hot enough to boil the fluid (which has a boil point of just over 400 F) but will get hot enough to possibly degrade performance. A lawsuit waiting to happen to Jeep I think, so they went around the frame instead. Also, that line as routed along the frame never really runs close enough to the headers to be an issue. Plenty of space and air swirling around to dissipate any heat transfer while the line runs along the frame. Then it gets cooled at the front of the Jeep anyway.

For example, I also have a Nissan 350z. The clutch fluid line uses DOT3 inside a rubber line and runs very close to the exhaust manifold pipes on its way to the tranny. Nissan heat wrapped the line with basically the same type of sleeve in the link above. Guess what, on a really hot day in traffic the fluid gets too hot and my clutch peddle gets soft and sometimes sticks halfway down. That's a design flaw that a lot of guys with Z's experience. I had to go to DOT4 fluid with a higher boiling point and myself added a TON of additional heat wrapping to the line just to get by on a hot day--and it still gets a little soft on a hot day. If it was a metal line, the problem would be even more amplified. Heat matters when you deal with anything brake fluid related.

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