Wide tires, or narrow tires? Which are better off road? - Jeep Wrangler Forum
Jeep Wrangler Forum

Go Back   Jeep Wrangler Forum > JK Jeep Wrangler Forum > JK General Discussion Forum

Join Wrangler Forum Today


Reply
 
Thread Tools

Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about them on WranglerForum.com
Old 08-29-2011, 11:51 PM   #1
Jeeper
 
PAVarminter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 178
Wide tires, or narrow tires? Which are better off road?

Wide tires, or narrow tires? Which are better off road?

This was a response to a new member's thread, and I thought it may stimulate some conversation. Here's my quote to get the discussion going -

"35" will really need a 2" lift, and actually with a 2" lift 35" tires are your max. Watch going too wide, a size or two over your stock width should be sufficient. Wider tires spread out the weight of your vehicle over the surface you are travelling on - sometimes NARROW tires are better to sink down through mud/scree/debris to get to the solid stuff to get a bite. Fat tires can "float" on mud and actually may be worse. I'm sure some other Jeepers will disagree, but I find narrower taller tires really perform better. Sand, which I do not ride on, probably calls for fatter tires to perform well - in that instance you WANT to "float" on the surface. In sand, narrow tires may sink and spin. But for Northeast mud and rocks I like a narrower tire, stock width is good."

__________________
NRA Life Member
Afghanistan Veteran
etc. etc.

The most important mod to your Jeep is the driver.
PAVarminter is offline   Quote Quick Reply
Old 08-30-2011, 12:03 AM   #2
Jeeper
 
rics1997's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Bristol, Tn
Posts: 4,764
That is my feeling for the most part but it is hard to get narrow 35. Now if we are talking about 33's it is easier but 35's not too many choices, at least to the extent it will make much difference like for example a 305/75/17 is a 35" tire that is around 12" wide. Just a 1/2" smaller then a true 35/12.5 tire. You could go to a 295/75/17 but that is only a 34.5" tire but is 11.6" wide. It is hard to get a tire up to 35 with the options available and not be in the 12 to 13" range.

But saying that there is another benefit to narrow tires and that is gas mileage. A more narrow tire has less surface area contacting the road which in turn causes less resistance. That is also why an over inflated tires gets a little better gas mileage then an under inflated one.

__________________
2010 Dark Charcoal Pearl Jeep Wrangler Sport S Automatic
4.88 Yukon w/Trac-Lok rear and Eaton ELocker Front - Synergy Gussets - B&M 70264 Trans Cooler
BDS 3" lift - BDS Fox 2.0 Racing Shocks
XHD front Bumper - Trektop NX - Goodyear MT/R w/Kevlar 35X12.5X15 on MB Chaos 5 Wheels - Thrush Turbo Muffler

Become a WranglerForum Supporting Member!
rics1997 is offline   Quote Quick Reply
Old 08-30-2011, 12:31 AM   #3
Jeeper
 
PAVarminter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 178
Rics I agree - that is why I like 33" tires. They fit perfectly the type of offroading I do, and there is good selection. I have a stock JK with 3:21 gears and so 33" tires (under a 2" lift) are about my max. And that set up works just great. For me. And I think 32" tires are just fine.
__________________
NRA Life Member
Afghanistan Veteran
etc. etc.

The most important mod to your Jeep is the driver.
PAVarminter is offline   Quote Quick Reply
Old 08-30-2011, 12:25 PM   #4
Jeeper
 
buschman's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: upstate n.y.
Posts: 39
i live in the northeast and i find a narrow tire is better in the snow
buschman is offline   Quote Quick Reply
Old 08-30-2011, 01:01 PM   #5
Jeeper
 
JIMBOX's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 9,914
My jeep lives in Northern Nevada and I have a 2˝" lift and 33"/11.5"x16" tires that are great in snow and sand--get good mileage and I don't do mud, cause it doesn't go with my yellow jeep !!

JIMBO
__________________
"ya gotta have class"
JIMBOX is offline   Quote Quick Reply
Old 08-30-2011, 01:09 PM   #6
Jeeper
 
country.boy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Ozark Mountains
Posts: 54
I love my wide tires on snow and mud but narrow tires have them beat on ice
country.boy is offline   Quote Quick Reply
Old 08-30-2011, 02:09 PM   #7
MallCrawler

WF Supporting Member
::WF Moderator::
 
kjeeper10's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Connecticut
Posts: 36,092
Ever see the tires on an old Willys?
kjeeper10 is online now   Quote Quick Reply
Old 08-30-2011, 02:22 PM   #8
Jeeper
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Broken Arrow, OK
Posts: 2,305
The area of the tire that contacts the road is almost exclusively a function of tire pressure. It is influenced slightly by tread design and tire stiffness, but air pressure is the dominant factor. Within a few percent, any size tire you install at a certain pressure will have the same contact patch area.
__________________
2012 Silver Sport S, Silver, 6 speed, soft top, 3.73s, LSD, PCG, Infiniti, deep tint windows, Pro Comp 1028 wheels, 33" Duratracs, Smittybilt bumpers and steps, KC fog lights, Mopar slush mats and fuel door.

Happiness is a belt fed weapon.
oilwell1415 is offline   Quote Quick Reply
Old 08-30-2011, 02:26 PM   #9
Statler & Waldorf Show

WF Supporting Member
 
Mykll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Davidian Bunker
Posts: 835
Send a message via AIM to Mykll Send a message via Yahoo to Mykll
Quote:
Originally Posted by kjeeper10 View Post
Ever see the tires on an old Willys?
Don't think I care to see what rubber old Willys use.
__________________
2012 Sport S 2D, Silver, Hardtop, Manual, Tow, 3.73, Infinity, Air Bags, Power Convenience
Heated Seats, Side Steps, Hood Lock, Gas Cap Lock, Fuel Door
Ordered 6/27/11, D1 6/29/11, Built 7/22/11, Delivered 8/19/11.
Hummer Kills: 6
Mykll is offline   Quote Quick Reply
Old 08-30-2011, 02:50 PM   #10
Jeeper
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 786
Quote:
Originally Posted by oilwell1415 View Post
The area of the tire that contacts the road is almost exclusively a function of tire pressure. It is influenced slightly by tread design and tire stiffness, but air pressure is the dominant factor. Within a few percent, any size tire you install at a certain pressure will have the same contact patch area.
100% FALSE. Tire pressure does impact the contact size (which is one reason to air down), but it does NOT determine contact patch by itself, or even a significant portion of it. A tire is not a soft-cushy, easily plyable balloon. It has considerable stiffness. If people would actually do the math rather than accept these ridiculous theories, they wouldn't be so widespread:

4000lb Jeep / 4 tires = 1000 lbs/tire

1000 lbs / 40 psi = 25 square inches (5" X 5")
1000 lbs / 30 psi = 33 square inches (5.8" X 5.8")
1000 lbs / 20 psi = 50 square inches (7.1" X 7.1")
1000 lbs / 10 psi = 100 square inches (10" X 10")
1000 lbs / 5 psi = 200 square inches (14.1" X 14.1")
1000 lbs / 1 psi = 1000 square inches (31" X 31")

Now do the math when you raise one tire off the ground and see how ridiculous these numbers become...

The myth is perpetuated by a complete misunderstanding of physics...its amazing what happens when someone takes a basic course and then thinks they can solve any problem with it. A steel drum at 10 psi or 1000 psi will produce roughly the same contact patch. Doesn't matter if its holding weight or not. A tire isn't as stiff, but there is a reason when you take it off, it retains its "rectangular" shape. A tire's contact patch IS determined largely by its size. Air pressure plays a role, but not THE role.

Qualifications on the subject: 9 math courses at or beyond Calc 1, a bachelors degree in mechanical engineering, a master's degree in mechanical engineering, and all-but-dissertation PhD in mechanical engineering. And a host of hands on experience.
Bubba68CS is offline   Quote Quick Reply
Old 08-30-2011, 03:04 PM   #11
ESP
Jeeper
 
ESP's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NC
Posts: 11,506
__________________
98 XJ 02 TJ 10 JK 13 JK

2013 JK - Lifted w/ 35s - Bilstein 5100s - Monster TB - Chopped Flares - Can't Keep It Clean
ESP is offline   Quote Quick Reply
Old 08-30-2011, 03:12 PM   #12
Jeeper
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 786
Just a note, I'm not specifically attacking oilwell...this myth is a plague throughout the internet and seems to be accepted by most people (even those who should be educated on the matter) who look at the units and figure, "sure, why not?". I'm more attacking the idiots who put that stuff up in the first place, ignoring the simple fact that a tire does have stiffness...and considerable stiffness when talking about low-profile tires, or truck/offroad tires.
Bubba68CS is offline   Quote Quick Reply
Old 08-30-2011, 03:16 PM   #13
Jeeper
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Broken Arrow, OK
Posts: 2,305
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bubba68CS View Post
100% FALSE. Tire pressure does impact the contact size (which is one reason to air down), but it does NOT determine contact patch by itself, or even a significant portion of it. A tire is not a soft-cushy, easily plyable balloon. It has considerable stiffness. If people would actually do the math rather than accept these ridiculous theories, they wouldn't be so widespread:

4000lb Jeep / 4 tires = 1000 lbs/tire

1000 lbs / 40 psi = 25 square inches (5" X 5")
1000 lbs / 30 psi = 33 square inches (5.8" X 5.8")
1000 lbs / 20 psi = 50 square inches (7.1" X 7.1")
1000 lbs / 10 psi = 100 square inches (10" X 10")
1000 lbs / 5 psi = 200 square inches (14.1" X 14.1")
1000 lbs / 1 psi = 1000 square inches (31" X 31")

Now do the math when you raise one tire off the ground and see how ridiculous these numbers become...
Thank you so much for making my point for me.

Quote:
The myth is perpetuated by a complete misunderstanding of physics...its amazing what happens when someone takes a basic course and then thinks they can solve any problem with it. A steel drum at 10 psi or 1000 psi will produce roughly the same contact patch. Doesn't matter if its holding weight or not. A tire isn't as stiff, but there is a reason when you take it off, it retains its "rectangular" shape. A tire's contact patch IS determined largely by its size. Air pressure plays a role, but not THE role.
LOL. I guess that's why the tire doesn't go flat when you let the air out. Oh wait, it does. The forces generated by the air pressure in the tire are huge compared to the stiffness of the tire.

Quote:
Qualifications on the subject: 9 math courses at or beyond Calc 1, a bachelors degree in mechanical engineering, a master's degree in mechanical engineering, and all-but-dissertation PhD in mechanical engineering. And a host of hands on experience.
That and a token will get you on a city bus. I am not impressed in the slightest with your list of "qulifications". I hold some of them plus a few others. If you spent money on all of those qualifications you should dispute the credit card charge. All you have learned is to make things overly complicated and try to prove to the world you are smarter than they are. Just as in the dyno thread you are taking something fairly simple and blowing it way out of proportion with things you seem to understand, but refuse to apply to real world situations. You are twisting words and concepts in an attempt to make yourself look good. People like you are why I'm glad I left school after getting my BS degree, which is exactly what they are: BS. A degree means nothing. You are the poster child for the concept.
__________________
2012 Silver Sport S, Silver, 6 speed, soft top, 3.73s, LSD, PCG, Infiniti, deep tint windows, Pro Comp 1028 wheels, 33" Duratracs, Smittybilt bumpers and steps, KC fog lights, Mopar slush mats and fuel door.

Happiness is a belt fed weapon.
oilwell1415 is offline   Quote Quick Reply
Old 08-30-2011, 03:26 PM   #14
Jeeper
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 786
Quote:
Originally Posted by oilwell1415 View Post
Thank you so much for making my point for me.



LOL. I guess that's why the tire doesn't go flat when you let the air out. Oh wait, it does. The forces generated by the air pressure in the tire are huge compared to the stiffness of the tire.



That and a token will get you on a city bus. I am not impressed in the slightest with your list of "qulifications". I hold some of them plus a few others. If you spent money on all of those qualifications you should dispute the credit card charge. All you have learned is to make things overly complicated and try to prove to the world you are smarter than they are. Just as in the dyno thread you are taking something fairly simple and blowing it way out of proportion with things you seem to understand, but refuse to apply to real world situations. You are twisting words and concepts in an attempt to make yourself look good. People like you are why I'm glad I left school after getting my BS degree, which is exactly what they are: BS. A degree means nothing. You are the poster child for the concept.
So very sad.

I've never seen a beadlocked tire at 1 psi have a 31" by 31" contact patch...much less one 33% larger when a tire goes up in the air.

Feel free to show me an example of this and, as in that "dyno thread" I will admit to being wrong.

But since you can't...I'm guessing you'll just throw a few more personal attacks my way
Bubba68CS is offline   Quote Quick Reply
Old 08-30-2011, 03:37 PM   #15
Jeeper
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 786
Bubba68CS is offline   Quote Quick Reply
Old 08-30-2011, 03:54 PM   #16
Jeeper
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Broken Arrow, OK
Posts: 2,305
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bubba68CS View Post
So very sad.

I've never seen a beadlocked tire at 1 psi have a 31" by 31" contact patch...much less one 33% larger when a tire goes up in the air.

Feel free to show me an example of this and, as in that "dyno thread" I will admit to being wrong.

But since you can't...I'm guessing you'll just throw a few more personal attacks my way
Now you are just being stupid. Just as before you are looking at the very extreme case and not the other 99%. At 1psi you would be pretty hard pressed to find a tire installed on a vehicle that isn't riding the rim or very close to it. When taken to that extreme the rim is bearing the load and the tire is so far from its natural shape that the normal rules no longer apply. Every rule has exceptions if an example is taken far enough from the norm.

In the dyno thread my claim was obviously stated multiple times. You can add power to the engine, but it will not be cheap and it will not be at an rpm that is useful in most driving. The point was made that the Challenger had a higher rating from the factory and that is correct. I stated that it was minimal, and that the difference in the rating was less than the difference between the AC being on or off. You then spun into a tangent about 8ft-lbs of torque wouldn't turn the AC compressor unless it was spinning, which had nothing to do with anything.

If you wish to continue, take it to PM. Your issues don't need to be aired here.
__________________
2012 Silver Sport S, Silver, 6 speed, soft top, 3.73s, LSD, PCG, Infiniti, deep tint windows, Pro Comp 1028 wheels, 33" Duratracs, Smittybilt bumpers and steps, KC fog lights, Mopar slush mats and fuel door.

Happiness is a belt fed weapon.
oilwell1415 is offline   Quote Quick Reply
Old 08-30-2011, 04:03 PM   #17
zombie & ninja slayer

WF Supporting Member
 
Redsand's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: southern illinois, no where near chicago (allendale)
Posts: 2,276
wide, for where i live
__________________

"It puts the lotion on its skin or it gets the hose again"
Redsand is offline   Quote Quick Reply
Old 08-30-2011, 04:06 PM   #18
Jeeper
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 786
Quote:
Originally Posted by oilwell1415 View Post
Now you are just being stupid.
Wow, am I good or what?? Called that one!

Quote:
If you wish to continue, take it to PM. Your issues don't need to be aired here.
To continue would require you to give the ball back...its still in your court after throwing not only a challenge, but data from a tire manufacturer your way. And now, I'm throwing yet another your way: the Bridgestone Director of Motorsport Tyre Development ~

Quote:
"A wider tyre means a bigger contact patch and more aerodynamic drag and rolling resistance, which can slow the car in a straight line, although a slightly wider tyre could enable higher speeds in the corners."
The shape of a Formula One tyre - F1technical.net

Better come back with something better than a personal attack this time bub.
Bubba68CS is offline   Quote Quick Reply
Old 08-30-2011, 04:28 PM   #19
Sponsoring Vendor
 
Ibuildembig's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Fruitland, Missouri
Posts: 8,439
I like um both, skinny for the mud and driving....wide for rocks and the looks

and for the record, a double beadlocked Irok wont be totally on the ground at 1 psi or 0 psi, I know this because I had a buddy lose both my front valve stems about 10 years ago and I had to ride most of the day with 0 psi in the fronts
Ibuildembig is offline   Quote Quick Reply
Old 08-30-2011, 05:24 PM   #20
MallCrawler

WF Supporting Member
::WF Moderator::
 
kjeeper10's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Connecticut
Posts: 36,092
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mykll

Don't think I care to see what rubber old Willys use.


I have no idea what this thread is about
kjeeper10 is online now   Quote Quick Reply
Old 09-03-2011, 09:14 PM   #21
Jeeper
 
PAVarminter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 178
So narrow tires for mud, to get down to the tackier stuff beneath? Ditto for snow? Maybe narrow tires are better on ice?

Wide tires for rocks.

Anyone agree or disagree?
__________________
NRA Life Member
Afghanistan Veteran
etc. etc.

The most important mod to your Jeep is the driver.
PAVarminter is offline   Quote Quick Reply
Old 09-04-2011, 06:13 AM   #22
Jeeper
 
JEEPDON's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Over the hill
Posts: 1,438
Tread design is a much more important factor to consider than tire width.
But with that being said, I will take the narrower tire of the same design over the wider in most situations. Narrow = more traction; wide = more floatatiion. Credentials== about 45 years of off road driving oilflields, feeding cows, hunting, playing . Experience==that is what you get right after you need it the most!!!
JEEPDON is online now   Quote Quick Reply
Old 09-04-2011, 07:22 AM   #23
Jeeper
 
PAVarminter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 178
I agree JEEPDON.
__________________
NRA Life Member
Afghanistan Veteran
etc. etc.

The most important mod to your Jeep is the driver.
PAVarminter is offline   Quote Quick Reply
Old 09-04-2011, 07:50 AM   #24
Jeeper
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Michigan
Posts: 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by JEEPDON View Post
Tread design is a much more important factor to consider than tire width.
But with that being said, I will take the narrower tire of the same design over the wider in most situations. Narrow = more traction; wide = more flotation. Credentials== about 45 years of off road driving oilflields, feeding cows, hunting, playing . Experience==that is what you get right after you need it the most!!!
x2. I'll take real world experience over number crunching scientific theory any day. Knowing what works can be as simple as opening your eyes and looking around.
MikeinMI is offline   Quote Quick Reply
Old 09-04-2011, 09:14 AM   #25
Jeeper
 
JeeperJake's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 2,896
I was a tire buster in a tire shop during my teens. We sold and serviced a wide variety of recreational and special application tires, along with the normal stuff.

Over a four year period, I was exposed time and again to the experience of multiple users and abusers, that most often in the sand and muck of SW Idaho outback, tall/narrow served better in their needs.

The downtown pavement dwellers favored the fatter/wider designs.

You could just about tell where a customer lived by what tires he installed.

One of the most instructive examples I had, was a mail carrier who drove the route from Boise to Idaho City to Lowman, all pavement, then the rocky canyon gravel wagon trail thru to Garden Valley, Crouch, and on pavement again at Banks to Horseshoe Bend. It was a demanding route into high elevation, desolate country and roads often impassable except to his Jeep Pickup, sometimes chained up on both ends. His choice was the tallest tires that would fit under his fenders, and he avoided the widest available because he said he needed to "dig down to bedrock" instead of spinning and floating. He ran that route for decades.

And while I agree tread design itself is very important, I spent a couple years banging around that same muck/sand/gravel/creek beds country in a nearly stock 650x16 Military UTD bar tread design, with barely any issue with traction.

Perhaps the advantages of 60hp were well balanced with the gearing and traction potential of a minimalist design. We never considered some of the trail/rock climbing antics seen today.

ETA: this was over 40 years ago. Times were simpler, and marketing was relatively less intense. Where today there are dozens and dozens of treat patterns there were a mere handful then. The science of rubber compounds was in its infancy.


Thanks for the discussion gents. I've got plenty of link reading to do now.
__________________
get in--buckle up--hang on
"soothing agricultural implement/personal servant/Walter Mitty multidimensional access utility device conveniently travels on pavement when necessary and often keeps me warm/cool/dry/soothed as needed."
JeeperJake is offline   Quote Quick Reply
Old 09-04-2011, 10:48 AM   #26
Jeeper
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Northern Wisconsin (near U.P. border)
Posts: 43
I do love my 33 x 10.5 x 15 BFG KM2 mud-terrains. Up here in N. WI they have taken me through everything except the suck me into the abyss Georgia clay type material which we do not have up here. In that case I wouldn't necessarily venture.
Christine is offline   Quote Quick Reply
Old 09-04-2011, 11:04 AM   #27
Rock-Rubber

WF Supporting Member
 
GoldenSahara00's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: SCPA
Posts: 16,702
I prefer wider tires on ice. Imagine a skate. Its a thin blade of metal. but when you wear boots, its a wider piece of material. Sure there is less force psi on the ice, but that allows more friction over a larger area which in application of tire on ice is good. Otherwise I agree with all the aforementioned

Oh btw, I like the whole engineers/physics battle above. I think what needs to be realised that that any tire can have the same amount of rubber touching, based on the amount of pressure in it. A wider tire with more pressure will have the same ground contact as a narrow tire with less. When run at proper pressure, the narrow tire will make less contact. But when you run a bigger (wider/softer) tire, you usuallly run less psi anyways, because there is more surface area for the weight to spread out on, so there is less need for higher pressures. So in the end it all balances itself out, and they are all tires. and when your sittin in 2 feet of mud your tires are covered either way.

Moral of the story - take it easy
__________________
Ryan - A good eye, a light foot, and a smart rig.
Bolt-ons are boring
AMERICAN JEEPER
My Build - http://www.wranglerforum.com/f118/pr...a00-74622.html
Rausch Creek Trip: 2014 Trip Coming Soon
GoldenSahara00 is online now   Quote Quick Reply
Old 09-04-2011, 11:15 AM   #28
Jeeper
 
subzero2931's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: San Tan Area, AZ
Posts: 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bubba68CS

Wow, am I good or what?? Called that one!

To continue would require you to give the ball back...its still in your court after throwing not only a challenge, but data from a tire manufacturer your way. And now, I'm throwing yet another your way: the Bridgestone Director of Motorsport Tyre Development ~

The shape of a Formula One tyre - F1technical.net

Better come back with something better than a personal attack this time bub.
Not sure if trolling or stupid....
subzero2931 is offline   Quote Quick Reply
Old 09-04-2011, 12:16 PM   #29
Jeeper
 
PAVarminter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 178
That is great info, JeeperJake. His experiences sound very close to mine. I prefer narrower tires, not very narrow but narrower than many put on their Jeeps. It's just a personal preference for the terrain I ride. Taller can get you a bit more in the air, but it can rob the engine of some power. I think with the 3.8 engine with 3:21 gearing that a good limit would be 33" tires. Which happen also to come in more narrow widths in general.

Good discussion here!
__________________
NRA Life Member
Afghanistan Veteran
etc. etc.

The most important mod to your Jeep is the driver.
PAVarminter is offline   Quote Quick Reply
Old 09-04-2011, 12:43 PM   #30
Jeeper
 
20YearProject's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Bismarck, ND
Posts: 82
[QUOTE=JEEPDON;1538026]Tread design is a much more important factor to consider than tire width.
But with that being said, I will take the narrower tire of the same design over the wider in most situations. Narrow = more traction; wide = more floatatiion. Credentials== about 45 years of off road driving oilflields, feeding cows, hunting, playing .

JeepDon, I agree with you 100%.

I've stayed out of the horsepower and torque debates specifically because of the wheelin' (fun and work) I did was a whole different monster. Everyone forgets about vehicle design (purpose) and tires.

Mudding was a daily challenge and rock crawling was a given. Torque and gearing were your friend. Horsepower would bury you to your axles before you could blink.

20YearProject is online now   Quote Quick Reply
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Jeep Wrangler Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
rims and tires for 2010 wrangler unlimited prophotodude Tires & Wheels 4 05-14-2011 11:01 PM
How wide can I go b4 the tires rub? MikesX2003 TJ General Discussion Forum 10 05-06-2011 07:58 PM
Traded The GY Wrangler Silent Armors! Blackbeard1718 JK General Discussion Forum 11 10-03-2010 02:17 PM
o5 Rubicon 6" Lift 33" Tires off road ready!!! pongli Classifieds Archive 0 07-11-2007 07:56 PM
tall narrow tires avail ?? jroth TJ General Discussion Forum 4 07-02-2006 10:20 PM



Download our Mobile App

» Featured Product

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:37 AM.



Jeep®, Wrangler, Liberty, Wagoneer, Cherokee, and Grand Cherokee are copyrighted and trademarked to Chrysler Motors LLC.
Wranglerforum.com is not in any way associated with the Chrysler Motors LLC