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Old 04-16-2012, 11:26 AM   #1
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Anti-Sieze & Dielectric Grease?

I am about to change the spark plugs in my 2005 Rubicon.

I have the shop manuals.

The manual does not say anything about anti-seize on the spark plug threads or dielectric grease on the plug wires (the short conection from coil to plug). Should I apply either?

What is the proper torque on the spark plugs?

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Old 04-16-2012, 11:36 AM   #2
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I grease the connections but don't do anti-seize... But that's just what I've always done.

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Old 04-16-2012, 11:43 AM   #3
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I suggest if you do use anti seize on your spark plugs take CARE not to overtighten them....Overtightening can occur very easily if plated threads are also 'lubricated' by anti seize.

The torque spec given for your plugs by the car maker is assuming you use their specified plugs and NO anti seize unless also specified by car maker. Spark plug metal bodies are hollow to allow large insulator, so therefore they tend to break off at the threads easily.

When tightening your plugs, your only mission is to fully compress the metal gasket, and then just enuff more to deal with thermocyclic expansion and contraction...If is much easier to exceed the ability of the plug to resist breakage when the threads are lubed by anti seize, and even more so when they are also plated with certain metal alloys.

That goes back to another reason I never buy silly, over hyped, over priced plugs but instead use those on the emmissions lable under the hood.

Here, read this as an example of my caution above: http://www.ngksparkplugs.com/pdf/TB-...1antisieze.pdf
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Old 04-16-2012, 01:00 PM   #4
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Good info on antiseize and plated spark plugs.
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Old 04-16-2012, 01:13 PM   #5
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As mentioned above the possibility of overtorqueing does exist however the benefits of anti-seize compound outweigh the risk of possibly overtorqueing. I wouldn't think of installing a spark plug into any motor without it regardless of NGK's disclaimer. Just use common sense, I believe the actual spec is 27 ft/lbs. Use a 3/8 inch ratchet not a breaker bar.. LOL.. Keep the anti-seize away from the electrode (plug tip), you only need a small amount on the threads. I started using it on plugs in the 80's when aluminum heads became popular then I just got in the habit of using it on all motors. Also dielectric grease is a good idea, I slather a good bit of into the plug boot before I re-attach the boots (you can use it on both ends of the plug wires).
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Old 04-16-2012, 01:30 PM   #6
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1. All I ever used years ago was a little motor oil on the spark plug threads. Of course that was totally wrong but guess what ..... no stuck plugs. Go figure.

Most, maybe all spark plugs for aluminum heads, come with a plating on them from the factory that prevents the plug from sticking when removed. Anti-seize is a waste there and furthermore not supported by the spark plug manufacturers. Same for oxygen sensors typically. If you take the plugs out and reinstall them, then since the original coating is compromised, a little anti-seize would be prudent.

2. As for dielectric grease, most new wire sets come with some grease to apply. So yes, use some dielectric grease on the connection and in the boot (use a Q-tip), when replacing the plugs. I use dielectric grease on all electrical connections.

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Old 04-16-2012, 01:37 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by scot68 View Post
As mentioned above the possibility of overtorqueing does exist however the benefits of anti-seize compound outweigh the risk of possibly overtorqueing. I wouldn't think of installing a spark plug into any motor without it regardless of NGK's disclaimer. Just use common sense, I believe the actual spec is 27 ft/lbs. Use a 3/8 inch ratchet not a breaker bar.. LOL.. Keep the anti-seize away from the electrode (plug tip), you only need a small amount on the threads. I started using it on plugs in the 80's when aluminum heads became popular then I just got in the habit of using it on all motors. Also dielectric grease is a good idea, I slather a good bit of into the plug boot before I re-attach the boots (you can use it on both ends of the plug wires).
Not just NKG...ALL major plug makers have taken the time and expense to caution dealers and certified shops of same...Us being where we are in the pecking order, are last to know or simply not insider enuff to ever know.

And as far as you citing a torque spec, take care to NOT go to that spec if it was determined when using dry, unplated plugs...Same for all threaded fasteners....

All of us develop certain habits in doing things once we do them long enuff....Usually, we take pride in our learned discipline and willingness to go the extra mile in our efforts....But take care when you thump your chest about being rigid in the face of evolving tech and materials....Don't be the guy who brags about doing it wronger longer ...
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Old 04-16-2012, 01:52 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by TJeepman View Post
1. All I ever used years ago was a little motor oil on the spark plug threads. Of course that was totally wrong but guess what ..... no stuck plugs. Go figure.

Most, maybe all spark plugs for aluminum heads, come with a plating on them from the factory that prevents the plug from sticking when removed. Anti-seize is a waste there and furthermore not supported by the spark plug manufacturers. Same for oxygen sensors typically. If you take the plugs out and reinstall them, then since the original coating is compromised, a little anti-seize would be prudent.

2. As for dielectric grease, most new wire sets come with some grease to apply. So yes, use some dielectric grease on the connection and in the boot (use a Q-tip), when replacing the plugs. I use dielectric grease on all electrical connections.
I disagree, especially with aluminum heads regardless of any "plating" on the plug threads. Two dissimilar metals will react over time and your chances for safe removal (without pulling the head's threads) increase greatly with anti seize. On many occasions I have struggled to remove spark plugs from customer's vehicles so I don't have much faith in the "plating" used by the plug manufacturers. Also if memory serves every new O2 sensor I have ever installed had a bit of anti seize on the threads right out of the box.
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Old 04-16-2012, 01:59 PM   #9
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Not just NKG...ALL major plug makers have taken the time and expense to caution dealers and certified shops of same...Us being where we are in the pecking order, are last to know or simply not insider enuff to ever know.

And as far as you citing a torque spec, take care to NOT go to that spec if it was determined when using dry, unplated plugs...Same for all threaded fasteners....

All of us develop certain habits in doing things once we do them long enuff....Usually, we take pride in our learned discipline and willingness to go the extra mile in our efforts....But take care when you thump your chest about being rigid in the face of evolving tech and materials....Don't be the guy who brags about doing it wronger longer ...
Exactly why my statement was preceded by "just use common sense"..
No chest thumping here, just as your advise recommends against it's use mine is for it. To each there own...
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Old 04-16-2012, 02:08 PM   #10
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Exactly why my statement was preceded by "just use common sense"..
No chest thumping here, just as your advise recommends against it's use mine is for it. To each there own...
JEZ, I didn't say NOT to use it guys!

I'm just offering info for you to consider when you DO use it.....Use that info to remind yourself to take care not be fooled into overstressing the threads by the double slickery offered by the lubricity of anti seize and plated threads.

REDUCE torque from spec if that spec was used on plugs that came unplated, and also if unlubed.

It's good info and if used properly, we'll see fewer posts here about how to remove broken plugs and repair stripped heads.
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Old 04-16-2012, 02:26 PM   #11
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So lets say that you did install ngk plugs w/ anti-seize, and torqued them to factory specs. Should you back them out?
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Old 04-16-2012, 02:32 PM   #12
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So lets say that you did install ngk plugs w/ anti-seize, and torqued them to factory specs. Should you back them out?
No, leave them alone.
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Old 04-16-2012, 02:43 PM   #13
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So lets say that you did install ngk plugs w/ anti-seize, and torqued them to factory specs. Should you back them out?
NO!.....it's a one way street thing and if you go too far the damage is done...you will either weaken or roll the threads in the head or break or weaken the plug wall where it's threaded.

Gents, I ain't NEVER been unable to remove OEM plugs from any engine I bought new even back in the 70's even when they had been installed for many years....I ain't NEVER damaged the threads on a head on those rigs either.....

But I have twisted off many a lug nut that I didn't tighten myself last and stripped or broken plugs that some idiot installed before me.
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Old 04-16-2012, 02:53 PM   #14
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Another thing to consider about anti-seize compounds...the spark plug's contact with the head is what supplies the ground to complete the ignition circuit. Without that ground, no spark.

Be sure to use an anti-seize compound that has a metal component to it. Or, if you can find one, that doesn't interfere with electrical/electronics.
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Old 04-16-2012, 03:06 PM   #15
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LOOK.....KEEP this in mind that "torque" is an INDIRECT measure of bolt stretch.....Yeah, in some cases it's possible to directly measure bolt stretch, but usually not.

Bolt stretch is a factor used to determine clamping force...Designers spec the number and size and materials of fastners based on the clamping forced needed to make a solid and reliable joint.

From there they determine that bolts of certain size, thread pitch, and material will stretch a given amount before breaking or going past their elasticity and still provide the clamping force required given the expected operating conditions, I.E temp ranges and so on....

So ok, they have studied how much a particular bolt needs to stretch by actually measuring it, then recorded how much torque it took to get it there, then used that torgue data get it there reliably when that bolt is employed in a configuration where it can't be actually measured.

That is why we have torque tables, and that is how we got the data shown on those tables.....So, that said you now understand how torque is an indirect measure of fastener stretch and the clamping forces achieved when the bolts are stretched to any given point.

While making those torques table, it was discovered that clamping forces and bolt stretch increased greatly when at the same torque, if the fasteners were lubricated.

This is not rocket science or black magic...all any threaded fastener is is an inclined plane wrapped around a shaft, and we as Men know you get lots better screwin with less effort if you lube it first....Promise
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Old 04-16-2012, 03:08 PM   #16
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Another thing to consider about anti-seize compounds...the spark plug's contact with the head is what supplies the ground to complete the ignition circuit. Without that ground, no spark.

Be sure to use an anti-seize compound that has a metal component to it. Or, if you can find one, that doesn't interfere with electrical/electronics.
That's good thinking...you are seeing the whole of it.

Rest assured that most generic anti seizes contain copper and or moly, and or graphite and are highly conductive.

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