Death wobble frustration is at an all time high PLEASE HELP ME FIND THIS HARDWARE - Page 2 - Jeep Wrangler Forum
Jeep Wrangler Forum

Go Back   Jeep Wrangler Forum > TJ Jeep Wrangler Forum > TJ General Discussion Forum

Join Wrangler Forum Today


Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools

Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about them on WranglerForum.com
Old 08-05-2012, 12:42 PM   #31
Jeeper
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Spin Boldak Afganistan
Posts: 18
For what its worth mine was solved by rebalancing the wheels

skinut88 is offline   Quick Reply
Old 08-05-2012, 01:07 PM   #32
Jeeper
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 2,473
Hoagie - if it's working fine, leave it.

As said there are many possible causes of DW. Sometimes it's a combination of things.

It's not just Jeeps - ever since solid axles were used. Just the name changed. Most of the time it was called shimmy".

I had a 52 Ford PU with it - cause was EVERYTHING was worn, kingpin bushings, rod ends, steering box etc. That was a fun beater truck.
No Panhard - big leaf springs.

Easy to tell if the TB holes are warbled - remove the nut, pull out the bolt, swing the TB down out of the way, put the bolt in the holes. if it fits real loose, it needs repair.

No need for straps to to pull the axle back in place. Simply turn the steering wheel - the axle will move easy. That's why the TB is used - to keep the axle where t belongs.

__________________
It's no wonder the country is falling apart - stupidity abounds!
rrich is offline   Quick Reply
Old 08-05-2012, 01:30 PM   #33
Moderator

WF Supporting Member
::WF Moderator::
 
doclouie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Was in the mountains, now in Texas
Posts: 3,671
Images: 4
Rebalancing the wheels (or replacing the steering stabilizer) may stop it from being triggered, but you did not fix the problem. You just eliminated what started it in your case. It will be back unless you fix it properly which is any number of different joints or bolts.

People really need to go through the sticky at the top of the forum as it will give them more than they will ever need to fix and not just mask the death wobble.
__________________
2000 Sahara, 3.5" Rubicon Express Lift, 1" spring spacer & 1" Body Lift, 33" or 35" BFG Mud tires, Front & Rear ARB, Rancho 9000 shocks, UCF Ultra High Belly Up

doclouie is offline   Quick Reply
Old 08-05-2012, 01:43 PM   #34
Junior Member
 
adawg38's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: westminster, co
Posts: 535
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hoagie. View Post
I paid someone 106 dollars to use a torch and swap bolts and I replaced it with a grade 8 bolt like everyone said I feel like the person that did it wouldn't have told me if the hole was egg shaped they would just do what I asked which was replace the bolt. It's a snug fit now for sure but maybe since I did the track bar myself it's not centered properly? I didn't have to use a one along or anything I chocked it up to good luck I got it to line up easily and from what I measured it seemed fine on both sides. I didn't use to much force on the track bar itself where the bolt is to make it longer and shorter. Could that be contributing to something?
You can tell if the axle is centered like you said, you measured it and it looks centered. Even if it isn't centered 100% it's not going to give you a wobble or DW and it's possible the Tech that did take out the bolt for the trac bar couldn't tell if it was egg shaped the slightest, mine I had to put in the bolt with the trac bar removed to see if there was too much play. You said earlier though that the DW was gone correct and you get a bit of a wobble at 50mph? I think you should focus on the wheels and tires...my .02 cents. I once had an automotive shop balance my wheels and not a 4 wheel shop and I got high speed wobble. I took it back and had them check it again and every wheel was off .25-.50 ounce. They calibrated their machine and got a much better balance. Take it back to the shop and tell them you have a vibration at 50mph and ask them to recheck each tire and see if that helps.
__________________
2006 SE 2.4L(4 angry squirrels under the hood)
3.25" RC lift with quick discos, 31X10.50R15 Firestone Destination MT's mounted on 15X8 Black D Windowed Wheels with 4" BS, Magna Flow Exhaust, K&N Air Filter, Bushwacker Rocker and Corner Guards.
RMGO "It's a Right, not a Privilege!"
adawg38 is offline   Quick Reply
Old 08-05-2012, 02:08 PM   #35
Sponsoring Vendor

WF Supporting Member
 
Black Magic Brakes's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 1,860
Quote:
Originally Posted by rrich View Post
Your keywords here - """if the connection was maintained properly."""

Normally the trackbar bolt is tight - and the holeS are barely bigger than the bolt, so it fit's tight. No problem there.

Normally the hardened sleeve inside the bushing pivots against the smooth shank of the bolt! The bolt itself should not move, the movement is between the shank and the sleeve.
And therein lies the fallacy that bankrupts your entire premise. The hardened bolt sleeve does NOT move or pivot against the shank of the bolt and if it does, the connection has failed.

Quote:
For some reason sometimes that connection "grabs" a little - dirt, rust, grit etc. It turns the bolt making it looser than it should be. (Notice it doesn't get lubed.) Now as the trackbar moves up and down, and pulls sideways pulls/moves the bolt, it begins to warble out the holes.

Once the holes become elongated the bolt slides back and forth even more, elongating the holes further. The TB can no longer do it's job - to hold the axle steady.

Even Jerry has posted how to correct the elongated hole - his method is to weld a washer over the hole with the correct sized hole.
And Jerry is wrong because that has not fixed the faying surfaces. It's a bandaid that has sorta worked, but it is by no means a "fix".

Quote:
But - that addresses the front hole only, not the rear hole. That fix works for awhile, then you have to do it again.

Sure, it's possible to cut the thin bracket off and fab or buy a new one and weld it on. I've done it several times.

But that doesn't help the average DIY'er without the tools or welder to do it. I was seeking an easy solution that the average guy could do in his driveway in a few minutes, - thus the kit. I provided everything except the drill motor and extension cord.

There was/is many posts requesting help for DW. There are many causes of DW, tires, alignment, loose steering etc. A loose Trackbar bolt is only one.

Obviously if the holes are not warbled out the DW problem is from something else.

In my posts and ads about the kit I always suggested one remove the bolt, swing the arm down and see if the bolt fits tight in the holes. If they were elongated or enlarged, the kit would help.

I'm surprised - I guess you haven't done many control arms by your statements. Or you always had employees do it and never watched.

The bolts that mount the lower control arms go into slots, yes. But offset keeper" washers hold the bolt in place, preventing it from flopping around in the slot.
I've done hundreds of control arms, I don't have any employees. NO the large washer does not do anything once the bolt is tight. If you would quit being so stubborn and try to learn something instead of being so set in your ways that you start trying to insult folks you would be able to prove my statements correct and discover the flaw in yours.

It's very easy. Take any front lower TJ control arm and loosen the bolt until it's just snug and go drive it. It will hammer that slot and the horseshoes into oblivion. Tighten the bolt and keep it tight and it never fails. The only thing the washer does is center the joint until the bolt is tightened.

Again, once the connection comes into shear, it has failed.

Quote:
Stock and aftermarket arms use them.

You even can buy cam-type keepers from the dealer to help with the caster - or make them.

As far as was suggested on this thread re: the trackbar bolt - using a larger bolt - that would mean drilling the hardened sleeve in the TB. That would be difficult for the average DIYer - a drill will overhead and ruin the rubber - it would have to be done with reamers. Most DIYers don't have the expensive reamers

KISS !
Reamers of normal types don't do well in those hardened sleeves either. The little nubs down inside tend to kill the chamfer and ruin the cutting ability. If you like your reamers, don't waste your time.
__________________
I am Savvy, I am the brake Wizard.
http://blackmagicbrakes.com
Black Magic Brakes is offline   Quick Reply
Old 08-05-2012, 02:17 PM   #36
Rock-Rubber

WF Supporting Member
 
GoldenSahara00's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: SCPA
Posts: 16,658
Doesn't the track bar and most bolts function through the clamping force of the tightened bolt, not through the bolt being tight or loose in the hole. So as long as the bolt is at torque spec the bolt could be any size theoretically? Please excuse me if "clamping force" isn't the correct term.
__________________
Ryan - A good eye, a light foot, and a smart rig.
Bolt-ons are boring
AMERICAN JEEPER
My Build - http://www.wranglerforum.com/f118/pr...a00-74622.html
Rausch Creek Trip: 2014 Trip Coming Soon
GoldenSahara00 is offline   Quick Reply
Old 08-05-2012, 03:06 PM   #37
Sponsoring Vendor

WF Supporting Member
 
Black Magic Brakes's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 1,860
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenSahara00 View Post
Doesn't the track bar and most bolts function through the clamping force of the tightened bolt, not through the bolt being tight or loose in the hole. So as long as the bolt is at torque spec the bolt could be any size theoretically? Please excuse me if "clamping force" isn't the correct term.
You are very correct and if stuff like this matters to you, do some research on proof vs clamp load and find out why most trackbar bolts fail.
__________________
I am Savvy, I am the brake Wizard.
http://blackmagicbrakes.com
Black Magic Brakes is offline   Quick Reply
Old 08-05-2012, 03:27 PM   #38
Rock-Rubber

WF Supporting Member
 
GoldenSahara00's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: SCPA
Posts: 16,658
Quote:
Originally Posted by Black Magic Brakes

You are very correct and if stuff like this matters to you, do some research on proof vs clamp load and find out why most trackbar bolts fail.
Cool, I will have to check it out.

Very interesting stuff.
__________________
Ryan - A good eye, a light foot, and a smart rig.
Bolt-ons are boring
AMERICAN JEEPER
My Build - http://www.wranglerforum.com/f118/pr...a00-74622.html
Rausch Creek Trip: 2014 Trip Coming Soon
GoldenSahara00 is offline   Quick Reply
Old 08-05-2012, 05:20 PM   #39
Sponsoring Vendor

WF Supporting Member
 
Black Magic Brakes's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 1,860
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenSahara00 View Post
Cool, I will have to check it out.

Very interesting stuff.
It is interesting and even more so because of how difficult it is for folks to see the forces and understand them in their minds. Also it's a very large challenge when you try and explain that what you think you are seeing isn't really what is happening.

Which is why I referred to it as the chicken and egg confusion. It's very difficult to prove which came first, the chicken or the egg and in the case of wallowed out holes in mounts, very few take the time to give it more than even a cursory glance from a forensic perspective and just assume that the bolt did it which is true, but not why the bolt did it.

The simple answer is the connection failed either from over tightening which tensioned the bolt past the yield limit which created the loss of clamping force or under tightening which let the connection come into shear. Neither scenario can be fixed or changed with hole size.

It's very difficult when folks refuse to learn. They look at at enlarged hole and think that the enlarged hole caused the problem instead of the reality which is the problem caused the enlarged hole.

The answer is also very easy to prove although most really don't want to hear it. The proof is as simple as machining a perfect hole for a perfect size bolt and then try to run it without torquing it correctly. It will fail very quickly and yet, it still doesn't sink in.

I install a lot of front trackbars and I repair lots of rigs as well as building custom suspension, custom steering and lots of custom and standard big brake kits. I rarely use anything but the stock trackbar bolt and about the most I ever do is snag one of the rear lower shock bolts and re-use it with the stock flag nut. I don't get come backs, I don't get failures and I don't get loose trackbars at the axle ends.

The one for control arms is even easier to prove. Take a pair of OEM control arm bolts from the rear of the front lower arms, use them in the slots without the large flat washers and then go for a drive. If there was the teeniest bit of correlation between hole size and connection viability, they would fail almost immediately and the fact is they won't as long as they are properly tightened.
__________________
I am Savvy, I am the brake Wizard.
http://blackmagicbrakes.com
Black Magic Brakes is offline   Quick Reply
Old 08-05-2012, 05:51 PM   #40
Supporting Member

WF Supporting Member
 
Gunner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Seal Beach
Posts: 7,050
An aftermarket dual patten automatic transmission flex plate on a chevy has much larger holes than the bolts that hold it on. Yet it will live under 500 hp of hammering at 6000 rpm until a bolt either breaks or comes loose. Then the holes will go egg shaped in a heartbeat. Torque them to spec and it just lives. Use ARP 190,000 psi bolts and if you under or over torque then they will fail just as fast as the stockers and the outcome is the same. Egg shaped holes. Clamping force and shear.
Gunner is offline   Quick Reply
Old 08-05-2012, 06:07 PM   #41
Sponsoring Vendor
 
JPi4.0's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 850
Quote:
Originally Posted by Black Magic Brakes

It is interesting and even more so because of how difficult it is for folks to see the forces and understand them in their minds. Also it's a very large challenge when you try and explain that what you think you are seeing isn't really what is happening.

Which is why I referred to it as the chicken and egg confusion. It's very difficult to prove which came first, the chicken or the egg and in the case of wallowed out holes in mounts, very few take the time to give it more than even a cursory glance from a forensic perspective and just assume that the bolt did it which is true, but not why the bolt did it.

The simple answer is the connection failed either from over tightening which tensioned the bolt past the yield limit which created the loss of clamping force or under tightening which let the connection come into shear. Neither scenario can be fixed or changed with hole size.

It's very difficult when folks refuse to learn. They look at at enlarged hole and think that the enlarged hole caused the problem instead of the reality which is the problem caused the enlarged hole.

The answer is also very easy to prove although most really don't want to hear it. The proof is as simple as machining a perfect hole for a perfect size bolt and then try to run it without torquing it correctly. It will fail very quickly and yet, it still doesn't sink in.

I install a lot of front trackbars and I repair lots of rigs as well as building custom suspension, custom steering and lots of custom and standard big brake kits. I rarely use anything but the stock trackbar bolt and about the most I ever do is snag one of the rear lower shock bolts and re-use it with the stock flag nut. I don't get come backs, I don't get failures and I don't get loose trackbars at the axle ends.

The one for control arms is even easier to prove. Take a pair of OEM control arm bolts from the rear of the front lower arms, use them in the slots without the large flat washers and then go for a drive. If there was the teeniest bit of correlation between hole size and connection viability, they would fail almost immediately and the fact is they won't as long as they are properly tightened.
This is all true. But it raises a question. If torque on these components is so critical (and it is) wouldn't fine thread bolts be a wise choice?
Besides jeeps we crush rock for a living. We have used fine thread bolts many times to help in applications where bolt hole diameter and torque are critical factors.

I am thinking fine thread and proper torque would resolve many of these issues once and for all.
__________________
Jeeperformance, Inc
Yucaipa CA.
877-795-JEEP
https://www.facebook.com/Jeeperformanceinc http://www.jeeperformanceinc.com/
JPi4.0 is offline   Quick Reply
Old 08-05-2012, 06:36 PM   #42
Supporting Member

WF Supporting Member
 
Gunner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Seal Beach
Posts: 7,050
Your right on with the proper torque and lube for the torque spec. You can change to a better material, rolled threads, increased thread root radius, Different lubes thread locker or thread pitch. Yes It will make for a better clamp. But you still come back to the basic premise which is you have to torque the fastener to a spec which does not exceed the elastic limit of the fastener, and still provides enough stretch to clamp the joint so it does not move. You can still under torque or over torque the best bolts and they will cease to do their job.
Gunner is offline   Quick Reply
Old 08-05-2012, 07:43 PM   #43
Rock-Rubber

WF Supporting Member
 
GoldenSahara00's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: SCPA
Posts: 16,658
Yeah Blaine that makes a lot of sense and I came upon that with a stock control arm where the bolt has actually over tightened over time and deformed. I assumed it had worn out because it was loose but tightening it proved impossible. I replaced the worn out bushing and bolt and torqued to spec and it was fine.


The info I found that you mentioned made a lot of sense. The clamping force compared to proof and all that. Over torturing causes the elastic and plastic deformation of the bolt before breaking and under torque causes the sheer situation you mentioned. Neither one is good.

Like everyone is saying, proper torque and there in clamping force is what's needed. You can change a lot of things to make it easier to reach a specific clamping force but the bottom line is when the bolt is torqued down to spec it will function as long as the clamping load at that torque rating is bellow the yield point for that specific bolt.


That's just my minor understand of the concept of course.
__________________
Ryan - A good eye, a light foot, and a smart rig.
Bolt-ons are boring
AMERICAN JEEPER
My Build - http://www.wranglerforum.com/f118/pr...a00-74622.html
Rausch Creek Trip: 2014 Trip Coming Soon
GoldenSahara00 is offline   Quick Reply
Old 08-05-2012, 07:53 PM   #44
Sponsoring Vendor

WF Supporting Member
 
Black Magic Brakes's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 1,860
Quote:
Originally Posted by JPi4.0 View Post
This is all true. But it raises a question. If torque on these components is so critical (and it is) wouldn't fine thread bolts be a wise choice?
Besides jeeps we crush rock for a living. We have used fine thread bolts many times to help in applications where bolt hole diameter and torque are critical factors.

I am thinking fine thread and proper torque would resolve many of these issues once and for all.
My personal preference is for fine thread bolts because the root diameter of the thread is larger than the equivalent coarse thread and the increases the strength and available torque value a not insignificant amount.

To show how touchy this stuff can be, I designed a product that clamped a 4 bolt flange that was supposed to deform a small amount to provide pre-load on a shouldered taper roller bearing. I ignored how much deformation I was getting because I figured I had it close enough. Then I started snapping the ends off the bolts when I brought them to the proper torque value. I solved the problem by shortening the spacer ring about 30 thou and decreasing the amount of angle under the nut when deformation occurred. No more broken F-911 bolts after that.
__________________
I am Savvy, I am the brake Wizard.
http://blackmagicbrakes.com
Black Magic Brakes is offline   Quick Reply
Old 08-05-2012, 10:52 PM   #45
Jeeper
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 2,473
It's just simple physics - If you leave it loose like you seem to promote, it will move.
The movement will wear/elongate the hole, allowing it to move more. Once it's worn no matter how tight you get it, it will still move.- and wear.

My kit that seems to challenge you was to repair the holes the easy way for the DIYer.

As I've said many times before "THERE ARE MANY THINGS THAT CAN CAUSE DW - THIS IS ONLY ONE OF THEM."

This was to REPAIR THE HOLES EASY.

You are making it complicated - do you really think it will bring you more business?
I always thought you knew what you were doing.
__________________
It's no wonder the country is falling apart - stupidity abounds!
rrich is offline   Quick Reply
Old 08-05-2012, 11:01 PM   #46
Sponsoring Vendor
 
JPi4.0's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 850
Quote:
Originally Posted by rrich
It's just simple physics - If you leave it loose like you seem to promote, it will move.
The movement will wear/elongate the hole, allowing it to move more. Once it's worn no matter how tight you get it, it will still move.- and wear.

My kit that seems to challenge you was to repair the holes the easy way for the DIYer.

As I've said many times before "THERE ARE MANY THINGS THAT CAN CAUSE DW - THIS IS ONLY ONE OF THEM."

This was to REPAIR THE HOLES EASY.

You are making it complicated - do you really think it will bring you more business?
I always thought you knew what you were doing.
A properly torqued bolt will not move on a slotted hole.
I use massive electric motors running crushers everyday. The forces are enormous. They are held in place with four bolts in slotted holes. I have broken massive mainshafts when Steel or other objects have stopped the crushers. The forces excerted are incredible. Not one time in 27 years have those motors ever moved unless the bolts were not tight enough.
__________________
Jeeperformance, Inc
Yucaipa CA.
877-795-JEEP
https://www.facebook.com/Jeeperformanceinc http://www.jeeperformanceinc.com/
JPi4.0 is offline   Quick Reply
Old 08-05-2012, 11:28 PM   #47
Sponsoring Vendor

WF Supporting Member
 
Black Magic Brakes's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 1,860
Quote:
Originally Posted by rrich View Post
It's just simple physics - If you leave it loose like you seem to promote, it will move.
I'm not promoting leaving it loose. Are you comprehension challenged? My entire point has been to tighten it correctly and quit worrying about it.
Quote:
The movement will wear/elongate the hole, allowing it to move more. Once it's worn no matter how tight you get it, it will still move.- and wear.
If that were true, how do the lowers stay tight in those egregiously over size slots?

Quote:
My kit that seems to challenge you was to repair the holes the easy way for the DIYer.

As I've said many times before "THERE ARE MANY THINGS THAT CAN CAUSE DW - THIS IS ONLY ONE OF THEM."

This was to REPAIR THE HOLES EASY.

You are making it complicated - do you really think it will bring you more business?
I always thought you knew what you were doing.
You haven't yet admitted that your entire premise for the repair kit is bankrupt and until you do, little else matters. As far as getting business, what I am selling in this thread? What are you selling?

This isn't about DW, this is about understanding how bolted connections, bolt sleeves inside bushings, and mounts work so you will quit perpetuating a myth. Until you understand that, it's a pointless waste of time and trust me, I know exactly how you are which is why I asked you to quit being so stubborn and try to learn something.
__________________
I am Savvy, I am the brake Wizard.
http://blackmagicbrakes.com
Black Magic Brakes is offline   Quick Reply
Old 08-05-2012, 11:31 PM   #48
Sponsoring Vendor

WF Supporting Member
 
Black Magic Brakes's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 1,860
Quote:
Originally Posted by JPi4.0 View Post
A properly torqued bolt will not move on a slotted hole.
I use massive electric motors running crushers everyday. The forces are enormous. They are held in place with four bolts in slotted holes. I have broken massive mainshafts when Steel or other objects have stopped the crushers. The forces excerted are incredible. Not one time in 27 years have those motors ever moved unless the bolts were not tight enough.
Not to mention that there are several places on the TJ that use adjustment holes or slots with no issue and no horseshoes for eccentric cams to ride in.

Chevy has alternator brackets made the same way and with the correct bolt and torque, they never move.
__________________
I am Savvy, I am the brake Wizard.
http://blackmagicbrakes.com
Black Magic Brakes is offline   Quick Reply
Old 08-07-2012, 07:54 PM   #49
Jeeper
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 2,473
No more of a myth than your rebranded brake pads are better than AutoChina's junk.

I simply repaired the warbled out holes, and it did the trick.
You object only because you didn't think of it - and haven't a clue about reality. Why didn't the factory didn't make them sloppy?

Here's a few things about it - more myths?

You've made yourself to be a fool several times before, nothing's changed. Do you want a list of some of the times your short man's ego did you in?

bolt hole fix


other dw problems


video from below of the TB moving


JEEP JK


DW in action FORD
__________________
It's no wonder the country is falling apart - stupidity abounds!
rrich is offline   Quick Reply
Old 08-07-2012, 08:13 PM   #50
Jeeper
 
Hoagie.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Northern De
Posts: 159
rrich that video has been the most helpful thing ive seen so far. ive seen the first one but the second one seems to be leading to my problem. my steering box started leaking so im gonna assume it may be contributing to my problem
Hoagie. is offline   Quick Reply
Old 08-07-2012, 09:38 PM   #51
IITYWTMWYBMAB

WF Supporting Member
::WF Administrator::
 
4Jeepn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Florence, KY
Posts: 10,072
Images: 5
okay everyone place nice and perhaps try helping the OP with his issue.
__________________
79.96.85.00.01.97.00.97.93.97.95.94
CJ.XJ.CJ. TJ. TJ.ZJ. TJ.TJ. ZJ.ZJ.YJ. XJ
4Jeepn is offline   Quick Reply
Old 08-07-2012, 10:00 PM   #52
Jeeper
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 2,473
It isn't always for the same reason. Sometimes it's one, sometimes another - or a combination of several.
Start with a good inspection,look for something loose. Shaking the steering wheel back and forth while watching it - you may see something loose. Wheels on the ground, and even in the air. Try both ways.

Use your fingers on all the joints and connection - often you can feel what you can't see.
Start with the cheapest and easiest when replacing parts.

The first video says the warbled holes is the most common reason. I disagree - not the problem in most cases - but it's certainly "up there."

If I've given that impression I didn't mean to - but it's not unusual either. Easy enough to look.

Having a closed mind without knowing why won't stop the DW.

I did some experimenting on my XJ ('95 has the exact same front suspension) over the last few days - came up with some interesting things. After I double check my findings I'll post them here for open discussion.
__________________
It's no wonder the country is falling apart - stupidity abounds!
rrich is offline   Quick Reply
Old 08-07-2012, 10:30 PM   #53
Sponsoring Vendor

WF Supporting Member
 
Black Magic Brakes's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 1,860
Quote:
Originally Posted by rrich View Post
No more of a myth than your rebranded brake pads are better than AutoChina's junk.

I simply repaired the warbled out holes, and it did the trick.
You object only because you didn't think of it - and haven't a clue about reality. Why didn't the factory didn't make them sloppy?
I've been repairing wobbled out holes and not warbled by the way, warble is what a song bird does, for a very long time.

I did this to repair some BS uppers someone had installed and drilled out the holes to 9/16's.




Quote:
Here's a few things about it - more myths?

You've made yourself to be a fool several times before, nothing's changed. Do you want a list of some of the times your short man's ego did you in?

bolt hole fix
You're quoting or using a source that can't tell the difference between a draglink and a tie rod and I'm the fool?

I was right there with you until he started recommending long radius arms, computer alignments and telling folks that the longer springs push the axle down. No, the longer springs lift the rig up, axle stays where it is. And it's clear from the damage to his UCA bushings that no one ever took the time to teach him how to set the preload on the uppers correctly

Quote:
video from below of the TB moving
Yep, rubber element in the bushing died, but did you happen to notice that the bolt wasn't moving?

__________________
I am Savvy, I am the brake Wizard.
http://blackmagicbrakes.com
Black Magic Brakes is offline   Quick Reply
Old 08-08-2012, 01:43 AM   #54
Jeeper
 
Hoagie.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Northern De
Posts: 159
Ok once I get off work I have a much better idea of what to do most people here have been helpful thank you
Hoagie. is offline   Quick Reply
Old 08-08-2012, 08:26 AM   #55
jcf
Bludger

WF Supporting Member
 
jcf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Moab UT
Posts: 12,823
Send a message via Yahoo to jcf
I think the OP has got the idea & the thread is going to be closed unless you all get along
jcf is offline   Quick Reply
Old 08-08-2012, 08:40 AM   #56
Jeeper
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 2,473
Why the bushing if hole size and shape makes no difference, it's all in the tightening?

Found some very interesting things with my XJ - it may be we've all been barking up the wrong tree. We may have been making the problem worse! After some more verification, I'll post what I've found for open discussion.
__________________
It's no wonder the country is falling apart - stupidity abounds!
rrich is offline   Quick Reply
Old 08-08-2012, 08:43 AM   #57
Sponsoring Vendor

WF Supporting Member
 
Black Magic Brakes's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 1,860
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcf View Post
I think the OP has got the idea & the thread is going to be closed unless you all get along
Why don't just close it then? It's a bit unfair to ask us to suffer through the crap with no recourse.
__________________
I am Savvy, I am the brake Wizard.
http://blackmagicbrakes.com
Black Magic Brakes is offline   Quick Reply
Old 08-08-2012, 09:00 AM   #58
jcf
Bludger

WF Supporting Member
 
jcf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Moab UT
Posts: 12,823
Send a message via Yahoo to jcf
Ok done!

jcf is offline   Quick Reply
Closed Thread

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Jeep Wrangler Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




» Featured Product

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:06 AM.



Jeep®, Wrangler, Liberty, Wagoneer, Cherokee, and Grand Cherokee are copyrighted and trademarked to Chrysler Motors LLC.
Wranglerforum.com is not in any way associated with the Chrysler Motors LLC