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Old 12-06-2011, 08:33 AM   #1
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MetalCloak 6Pak Shocks & 5.5 Dual Action Spring Install/Review

NOTE: This post is lengthy and has MANY pictures.

INTRO
MetalCloak has just released their new shocks called the 6 Pak shocks. These are a far and drastic departure from what most any of us have ever had experience with. Thanks to a friend who "tipped" me off about their development as a passing idea I decided to check it out. Long story short I have been very fortunate to have been just a hand full of people who will receive these first as a member of their "pre-release" group. ALL LCG, & HIGHLINE FENDER PEOPLE are going to LOVE these!

These have the longest shock travel relative to compression length for any off road shock ever built in history. They are marketing these as a "coil over alternative". They utilize what they are calling "Floating Shock Body Technology" or FST for short. What this means is you have parallel shafts that extend out from a floating shock body. This is then coupled with dual reservoirs. So these shocks compress and extend from both ends, frame and axle end. Due to the pressurized bodies and reservoirs, the body stays in the center.

They sell these either in kits, or individually IIRC. And before anyone else says it... these are NOT cheap. But they are cheaper than the coil over route if you consider all you would have to do to be able to run coil overs correctly. These will be a stepping stone for me, of sorts. I am sure there will be a day, if I keep it up, that I will do something more along the lines of Murphy, Don, Phillip and what several others have done.

The models offered are as follows:
GC1213 $399 12" stroke: compressed eye to eye 13"/extended eye to eye 25"**
GC1414 $419 14" stroke: compressed eye to eye 14"/extended eye to eye 28"**
GC1615 $439 16" stroke: compressed eye to eye 15"/extended eye to eye 31"**
**Having talked with their lead engineer about their lengths, these shocks actually measure a bit longer since they use rod ends at each end and this also gives you some slight adjustment.

The kit I got is for the 5.5 LA lifts, at this time it is the only kit for the TJ they have available. But there other kits in development and soon to come. So hang tight if you're interested. After MANY, MANY phone conversations with Matson and even a few with Doug a lead engineer at Metalcloak... We settled on their GC1414 shocks for my application. There was temptation to run the GC1615s in the front, but with my lift being a radial arm in the front there was going to be some problems. Regardless I will gain quite a bit from this upgrade! I gain the best of both worlds in both droop and compression and do not have to choose one or the other to sacrifice with these as my shock choice.


So here is what you get and how they come to you:


I have to say, these guys really pack their stuff well! :laugh:


Here is what is inside once unpacked. Basically bolts and two brackets for the front, the shocks, four bar pin eliminators that are front and rear specific, some Blue Ribbon Coalition info, and some MetalCloak decals.



Here is a closer look at the brackets that go on the front and thus creates the shocks upper mount. These are left and right specific also which I will show later. These Brackets are what they sent me FIRST. For my particular application they ended up not working for me. This prompted MetalCloak to create a second upper mount bracket that I will show in a picture later in this write up. But for all intense and purpose, their revised bracket looks more similar to the upper stem-to-eye conversion brackets that several aftermarket companies produce. The bracket you receive with your kit may depend on the suspension you are running, and the lift height.


Here you is a closer look at the four bar pin eliminators. Two that are symmetrical in design for the front, and two for the rear that contain an offset and are right/left specific.


MetalCloak is also starting to produce their own spring sets. These are a little different from the normal coil springs and even the progressive rate springs. Pictured below, you will notice that they look very similar to a progressive rate spring. I needed new springs anyway, so it made sense to just go ahead and give these a try. To the best of my knowledge, no one makes a full set of progressive rate springs for a 5.5 lift. But I do know that Poly/Synergy has some front only spring sets out. With the MetalCloak spring design, the springs are quite a bit longer that my old 5.5 RE springs and that is done on purpose so the spring doesn't unseat (or at least as much) at full droop however this does not add additional lift height. When installed the coils that are closer together will actually sit on top of one another, or collapse. Doug at MetalCloak explained that what this does is maintain your spring rate just as any other lift spring, but in a sense lowers your upper spring mount location. This lessens the springs tendency to want to arch and pop out when fully compressed. The front and rear RE 5.5 springs are in the center with their corresponding counterpart to each side. I can also say that the diameter of the coils of the rear springs is a little smaller than most aftermarket springs I have seen. This also gives you a little more room in and around the area that they install. I did not take any pictures of the spring installation am I going to cover that topic here in this write up. I believe that is pretty basic and straight forward and most of us have done a spring change several times. I will tell you that while I have been able to droop out my axle (front or rear) using stands and a jack in my driveway to remove or re-position my old RE springs I cannot do so with these. Their added length makes it way too difficult. You may also notice that in most all of the subsequent pictures in this write-up these springs are not pictured. The springs were a late arrival and not installed on the jeep till the very end when 98% of everything else was done. But there will be some pictures later with everything installed.


FRONT INSTALLATION

Being one of the very first people to get these, I didn't have any instructions. But the install is pretty basic and straight forward. I also have the guys at MetalCloak on the phone any time I needed them. In the future, they will have instructions available via their website, where they place ALL their instructions.

**This should go without saying, but you might want to coat everything in antisieze. If you wheel and work on your own junk, you know that this is important. Hiem joints LOVE to seize up at the threaded section.**

First I installed the upper brackets into the OE shock mounts. These brackets are driver/passenger specific. Each bracket is angled to fit the contours of the OE upper shock mount.
Here you see the passenger side bracket and how it is angled:


Here is the driver side, NOTE how they are angled differently!


I started with the passenger side, you install the bolt in the top of the bracket through the OE upper shock stem hole. Tighten this down so that it holds the bracket in place, you can see the top bolt I am referring to in pictures up above. Next you will need to drill some 1/2" holes for the bolts that install on the side of the bracket (bolts are parallel to ground). The top bolt MAY already be there for you from the factory, but on some models you will need to take a die grinder or dremel tool and "elongate" the existing hole so that the bolt for the bracket will pass through. Here is a picture to aid in visualizing this. You cannot see the bolt in the top that is holding things in place while I drill and ensure that the other two bolts will go in correctly. When you drill or grind, watch out for the brake line that is routed behind the OE shock tower.


Earlier I said that I did not use the brackets that I just showed and demonstrated to you. The reason I did not use these is because during the final testing we picked (for instance) the rear driver side tire up with a forklift to see how things compressed/drooped... the front passenger side tire would rub the upper portion of the shock body if you were trying to turn the jeep to the right. My track bar was off by .25", but this was not going to cure the issue. A quick call to Doug and they went to work right away to try and duplicate the issue on their test TJ. The result was MetalCloak making me a new upper shock mounting bracket for the front. My apologies for not snapping a picture of these prior to them being installed. But you can get the general idea from the picture below. They are similar in design (still different though) to the conversion brackets many other companies make that will allow you to convert from the OEM stem style mount in the front to a traditional eye mount as found on many style shocks. This solved all my clearance issues along with re-positioning the front shock bodies to angle toward the spring a little.



After I had the top bracket is installed and you have everything tightened down, I then moved on to the lower bar pin eliminator for the front.

These eliminators are symmetrical and do not have a left or right designation. The installation of these are pretty basic so I am not going to go into that. Once the eliminator is put inside the shock's hiem joint and the eliminator's bolts are tightened things should look as this:


At this point it is important to note a few things. Now is the time to ensure that the hiem joints at the top and bottom of the shock you are installing are set to the same length. on a TJ you want the two reservoirs (the 2 red tubes) to be on the outside, away from the frame. The final position of the shock may have to be determined after you test the flex of the jeep to ensure nothing contacts the tires particularly if you are running a very aggressive tire with side biters like my Nitto MGs. Next you will be installing the shocks upper hiem joint/mount into the gold bracket you installed earlier. If you have ever dealt with gas pressurized shocks before, you are fully aware that this can be a task. I don't have any tips for this, it helps if you have a strong friend to help out while you slide the bolt in through the hiem joint. In the process of doing all this you want to make sure that you also orientate the supplied misalignment spacers the correct way. When you are done the upper mount and shock hiem should look like this:

How it looks with the first upper shock mount...

And again, how it looks with their revised upper front mount....


To finish up the installation of the front shocks you now need to orientate the hiem joints in a manner that it keeps the shock body from flopping around left and right. To lock the shock in place, regardless of its location, you will turn the hiem joints at the top and bottom in opposite directions so that it cancels their ability to swivel left or right. You secure this location through the jam nut. Notice in the pictures up above that the hiem joints pictured in the upper shock mounts are turned differently than the hiem joints pictured in the lower BPEs, this is why. You will also have to do this on the rear shocks and I will cover that later.

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Old 12-06-2011, 08:36 AM   #2
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REAR INSTALLATION

The rear shocks are more time consuming to install and MAY require some light fabrication depending on your pinion angle, the type of lower shock mounts you have and/or any relocators you may use, and depending on the gas tank skid plate you use. Having a 5.5 lift, My pinion angle is quite a bit. I was running the OE lower shock mounts with terra flex relocators. And I have the stock OE gas tank skid and tank basically cause I cannot seem to make up my mind rather I want to buy a new skid or a whole Gen-Right assembly. So I had to do quite a bit of modification (which still isn't much) and I needed the assistance of a local shop since I do not have a welder nor a forklift for testing. Hopefully through the experience and feedback I have provided to MetalCloak along with that of other pre-release persons like myself... installation will be a little simpler for people who buy these later down the road. But there may still be a need to modify things like I am about to show you.

First let's make some room for things to move around back there were the shocks mount. The lower spring perch (if it is OEM) will need to be trimmed. You have a choice to either simply trim the least little bit you need once you install everything and see how much you may need. Or you can do as I did and trim a decent amount. After talking with Doug at MetalCloak I knew that at least a 1/4" of the back side of the spring perch on the axle end needed to be trimmed. I also knew that I needed to leave enough material on the spring perch to fully support the first revolution of the spring's coil, the pigtail as some call it. So I found an acceptable amount to trim in between those two variables and ended up cutting approx 3/4 of an inch as seen in the pics below. The first picture is courtesy of Doug @ MetalCloak and shows the driver side rear spring perch and the area he identifies as the least amount needing to be trimmed on a stock TJ.





Next I needed to make some room with the OE gas tank skid on the driver side. This step is NOT necessary for everyone for three basic reasons. First, jeep has made several different tank skids for various years and models. The OE skid I have just happens to be the only OE skid they made that would require this modification. Second, even if you have the same skid as I do, this step still may not be necessary cause of differences in lift height, and slight variations found between OE tank skid plates (You'd have to test it to see). And third, if you already have an aftermarket skid or tank/skid combo such as Metalcloak's new skid, Rokmen, Savvy, Kilby, PSC, Gen-Right etc... you will not have to modify anything. Those skids are already modified for the sole purpose of eliminating bulk and to free up space. I have never bought any of these myself simply cause I cannot make my mind up between a skid plate upgrade or an entire tank/skid replacement.

On the driver side there is a portion of the tank skid up near the top that leans out toward the shock a little. Now I tried to just beat it in with a BFH as Doug @ MetalCloak said to do. But the steel and the bends that it has just would not allow it, the metal would simple bounce right back. You could drop the tank and try this, but I hate messing with the thing. I elected to trim the gas tank skid plate, and as it turns out Doug found this to be a good solution for one of MetalCloak's installations as well. To trim the tank, I shoved a big piece of 3/16" thick steel between the tank and the skid to protect the plastic gas tank and used a die grinder with a cutoff wheel to trim the area I needed. Before the flaming begins on my choice in how I did this... PLEASE KNOW that this has potential to be extremely dangerous. So if you have fuel leaks, vapor leaks or anything leaking concerning gasoline... you should not do this. Having a 1.25" BL I had some space between the body and the tank, so I did pack the area with wet towels as tightly as I could, and a welding blanket comes in handy as well. It might not have really been much of a preventative measure, but it made me feel a little better. I also checked and ensured that I had no leaks anywhere or EVAP codes indicating any leaks. Here are some pics of the area on the driver side gas tank skid plate and what I trimmed.



Next I had to cut off and replace the stock OE lower shock mounts and Terra Flex relocators. For my application they simply were not going to work. But, using MetalCloak's lower rear shock mount I would gain ground clearance since my old setup hung down low, and I would gain droop as it moved the mount location up about 2.5". MetalCloak's lower rear shock mounts index off of the inside lower control arm mount tab. There are also left and right differences that you need to pay attention to, each side is designed to angle towards the inside of the center line of the jeep. This step also may take a little bit of testing and re-positioning of the lower shock mounts. You only need to tack them in place until you are certain of where they need to be. The pictures I have are deceiving. They make it look as if the new mounts hang down a little lower than they actually do. But this is an illusion caused by a combination of camera angle, and the jeep being on a lift. The first four pictures are from Doug at MetalCloak and show how the lower shock mounts should fit and if needed, where you may have to grind a small portion of the inside lower control arm mount tab off.




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Old 12-06-2011, 08:37 AM   #3
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Here are my shots after the welding:




Once all this is done you can now permanently mount the rear shocks. And odds are that by this point in the installation you have already had them on and off several times in some fashion or another. The top of the shocks mount on one of MetalCloak's bar pin eliminators. The BPEs are constructed in a manner that they offset the top of the shock out away further from the frame rail. A pictures of these by themselves can be seen at the beginning of this post, 5th picture down. The best picture I have of the BPEs & shocks installed together on the jeep is three pictures down from here. The bottom of the shocks mount in the new mounts that I got from MetalCloak and shown up above with the addition of two small aluminum spacers to center the lower hiem joint in the middle of the mount.



Some other things to note... In the rear the position of the shocks is critical! There is plenty of room, despite how many times you second guess that idea. But you need to get access to a wall, RTI ramp, forklift, something to flex and test out the shocks once they are installed in their mounts so that you can dial in their position with the hiem joints. You have around 5║ of movement that you can swivel them and adjust. Once you have found where they can stay and not be in contact with anything else... you need to lock them in just like the fronts were. To lock the shock in place, regardless of its location, you will turn the hiem joints at the top and bottom in opposite directions so that it cancels their ability to swivel left or right. You secure this location through the jam nut. For a picture of this go back and look at the pictures of the front installation, the hiem in the upper mount is turned a different direction and the lower hiem that is mounted in one of the BPEs. Doing this on the rear shocks is a very small PITA... it helps if you have a 19mm or 3/4" stubby wrench or a acetylene torch to "customize" a bend in an older 3/4" or 19mm wrench that you already have.

Here are some pictures of the overall rear shock installation, some are with the suspension dropped and others are when it is compressed. Other pictures simply show some clearances and positioning.






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Old 12-06-2011, 08:38 AM   #4
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Additional Spring Pics









FINAL THOUGHTS & REVIEW
Shock and spring combinations, the parameters they must meet and operate under, compounded with the various suspension set-ups and the geometry incorporated along with driver preferences is a VERY complex subject. There has been tons of information and books written on this subject and it really is not as simple as some of us would like to think. I really think MetalCloak has done their homework on this. Are these shocks for everyone, no. Some are simply not going to see the point to the expense in relation to the coil over option especially when they have several vehicles, a garage, and a welder. That is fine. Hey if I had those things and the time I might not have made the choice I did either, I don't know. Similarly, not everyone is going to throw down the money for this set up either, and that is fine also. The jeep community is fortunate to have a great deal of choices from the cheap to the expensive range of good shocks. And some might be hesitant due to the mild complexity of the install that I have demonstrated cause they may not have some of the resources I have the privilege of having. BUT to those people I do want to say that they might want to wait and think about it. My experience and desire to do this was to be one of the first, to be a part of (even though very small) a products development and show it to everyone as a new option in the jeep community. I also helped MetalCloak see how an average "Joe" would tackle their install, the issues they would face, what worked and what didn't through the eyes of people like us here on this forum. I have a very strong suspicion that those who purchase this kit in the future regardless of lift height will have a little easier experience and clear direction cause MetalCloak has take my experience and of those others like me and used it for the advice of others.

Having said that, I can honestly say that this install was not hard. It did take me a while cause we all were experimenting and learning as we went along. It should not take a person who reads this and wants to go this route near as long as it did me IMO. MetalCloak is a very bright group of people and really bent over backwards with every little concern, question and thought throughout this entire process. Their customer service really ranks up there as one of the very top experiences I have ever had with a company. I really hope that never changes or falters cause we all know that is a very important part of any purchase and it is also a very high selling point for any company doing business in the jeep community. Likewise

I also want to take the time at this point to offer my sincere gratitude for Richard at The Hobbie Shop in Winchester, KY. His shop is a sponsor of the local club I belong to. I do not have my own vehicle rack/lift, forklift or RTI ramp, and I have not bought a welder thus far. He was generous enough to allow me to come to his shop for some minor welding, and adjustments during the installation of the rear shocks, the springs and subsequently after for the overall testing of the entire system. His shop is one of very few shops near me that is to be considered "full service". And basically if you can dream it he can make it, he has some really nice buggies out and about this area that can make you drool quite a bit. If it were not for him and his shop I really would have had some trouble with certain areas of the install and testing throughout the process. If you have a local shop, be sure to get to know them, and try to support them when possible. There are not many of these shops around. To people like me, they are what allows you to do modifications and repairs that we just cannot do on our own at home and that normal mechanic shops simply just do not understand.

For the review, let me start by saying that I will have to make a separate post or edit this original to include an off road review. The holidays are in mid-swing, things are winding down due to weather and schedules are getting busy. But I will post my thoughts as soon as I can.

On the road:
The shocks/springs are firm but forgiving. Body roll and the general "wag" of the body when making small quick movements are more controlled and decreased. That sway or feeling as if the body is wagging like a dog's tail is decreased to the extent that is isn't hardly noticeable. The ride isn't a far departure from what I was use to, I never thought my jeep rode bad to begin with, so that is good! But there is a noticeable decrease in the smaller bumps felt. In general, pot holes, uneven pavement, cracks, etc have all been decreased considerably. One bump particularly here where I am was significantly decreased. Normally you would hit it at 55MPH in a turn and going uphill and it would really make the jeep jolt. The jeep not only absorbed more of the jolt, but maintained control much better while going over it. It is nowhere near as scary as before. Also gone are the days of hearing the old rubber shock bushings thump against their mounts due to wear. The hiem joints at each end of every shock really changed that. In corners at speeds above 45MPH the jeep feels more firmly planted with less sway. I started with RE springs and shocks, despite the thoughts of many... I did not ever have any real complaints with those two components for the price. But the ride quality is improved with the new MetalCloak set-up, and that is above/beyond the added control of the shocks and springs as well as their compression and droop abilities. Now does the jeep ride like the few large Cadillac vehicles I have been in? NO, not expecting it to either. Are you kidding me? It is a jeep that is taken off road! If you want a Cadillac ride get a Cadillac.

Flex
I did not get the opportunity to measure before and after the amounts of flex. But I know the jeep and what it was like, yea I know that doesn't help you out much. The changes in flex is simply amazing! I really have a hard time putting the changes into words. It is going to be a real game changer for my jeep and the areas I travel. I gained droop and compression at all corners. It is important to consider when reading this or if you think you might be interested in these for yourself the added compression. It is easy to get caught up in the whole droop thing, but compression is just as important and these shocks give you both.

The most obvious change for me is in the rear. Yes having different lower shock mounts also contribute to this change (approx ~1"). But the shock itself has soo much more extension than what I had been using that it has really opened up the capability of the rear suspension. Now there is room for the suspension to move and actually work, it is not hindered by limitations on droop or compression. And that hold true for the front suspension as well. What I gained the most of in the rear is droop. Compression capability was always there for the most part due to the way my old shocks were mounted (the lower mount being located so low & thus sacrificing ground clearance). My rear is now able to compress the same as before, more than before actually. But the droop that I now have in the rear is simply off the chart for a jeep of this nature and setup. It is really going to allow the tire to stay in contact with the ground so much better than before and not "dangle" going up ledges at a skewed angle. In addition to this, I expect it to really be a significant change in the rear due to the added extension that the dual action springs have when one side is drooped out in addition to the added travel of the shocks. It is my belief that this creates a much more stable "feel" in certain areas while off road. The springs will not unseat nearly as soon as the old RE springs. I can see how they have helped level the jeep out (in a sense) while sitting off camber on the forklift. Part of this I believe is due to the added shock length which is allowing the frame/body to stay more level since the added travel is there. Travel is there due to the shocks, stability IMO is due to the added spring length and their dual rate characteristics supporting the frame/body. This will be judged more in depth later when off-roading of course.

I was limited a decent amount in droop/compression at the front as well. Typically front shocks tend to be a little longer than the rear anyway if you study what is out there in the market. The combination of BPEs, mounting brackets, hiem joints that allow fine tuning, and a shock that has extended droop and yet is still able to compress down like no other is changing the way I am thinking of using my front end when on the rocks. Not only do I have much more droop that I can utilize in the front, but I also can now take into further consideration the added compression capability. In fact, I had to adjust my bumpstops for these shocks to allow for more compression. But also to ensure that there was still adequate limitations on up travel cause these shocks will allow more compression/up-travel than what my fenders will allow. This is true for the rear fenders and bumpstops also. Highline fenders or MetalCloak fenders would really compliment this set-up due to the additional compression gains. If you want it in a nutshell... Honestly, the areas I would have to travel to in order to utilize every inch would be places where most would not want to go in a jeep like mine considering the wheelbase. Besides, in scenarios like that I am sure I would have long before experienced my fair share of "pucker factor." If you want a simple two word description of what these shocks are all about, here it is: "Flex in a Box!" They ride very well on the road, they essentially bolt right on with either no or very little modification, and they open your jeep up to a capability that has never been seen in both compression and droop.

Some Added Info.
All gas charged shocks, regardless of brand, lose their nitrogen over time. It is just a simple fact that you cannot get around. Weather, use, debris, etc all take a toll over time on seals. These shocks, like many others, are fully rebuild-able. Furthermore, you have two Schrader valves per shock on these: one valve for the side pointing up and one valve for the side pointing down. As time goes by, eventually one side will lose a tiny bit of gas, enough that the shock will generally want to gravitate to either the up or down position. This is not a huge issue. It can be left as is, or if you are obsessive like me you can burp the opposing valve to equate the gas in the tubes to level things out. I believe I was told you can do this two times before you need to consider adding nitrogen to the system. One thing about it is, at least these shocks show you if they are low or if one side has less pressure versus the other by the way the shock body rests. Other gas shocks, like the ones I use to have (& weren't adjustable anyway) do not. You have to have a gauge capable of reading the high pressures to test them. And in terms of gas charged shocks.... 1/2 of one PSI makes a difference.

Flex Pics With The Old RE Springs.
**NOTE** In these pics: As with any pic we have all seen of someone's trip off road... pictures really do not do it justice. The suspension was never compressed enough for the bumpstops to make contact, AND the shocks still had room to compress more. We stopped lifting with the forklift at our "comfort level" to avoid an in-shop rollover. I also noticed later (& failed to get pics of) that the new dual rate springs worked a little better with these shocks at allowing the jeep to be more flexible.





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Old 12-06-2011, 11:39 AM   #5
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Wow...what a great write up!!! Do you have pictures of the Jeep Flex with the MetalCloak springs?
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Old 12-06-2011, 11:47 AM   #6
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WOW! It is really all I can say...
What a fantastic in-depth review! Thanks for sharing your experience so far with the 6Pak Shocks and the MetalCloak Dual-Rate Coils; looking forward to your wheeling pics!
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Old 12-06-2011, 12:25 PM   #7
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Greattttt review, and you did a nice job installing them!
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Old 12-06-2011, 05:11 PM   #8
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Thanks everyone! This is the first really detailed writeup like this I have done. So I wanted to do it right especially since these shocks are so different compared to what we are all use to.


Jeepineer: I'm sorry, I ran off and left the camera when I installed the springs and did the subsequent flex test. The shop I did the testing at is about 40 miles from me, so if I get the chance the next time I am up there I will get a few. But it will probably be a while.
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Old 12-07-2011, 11:43 AM   #9
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Wow...what a great write up!!! Do you have pictures of the Jeep Flex with the MetalCloak springs?
Here's CLOAK 1... running the TJ Long Arm Upgrade Kit...

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Old 12-08-2011, 06:34 PM   #10
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Here's a video of Cloak2 playing at Prairie City SVRA...

MetalCloak1 TJ_play at Prairie City OHV.mp4 - YouTube
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Old 12-08-2011, 08:33 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by matsonian
Here's a video of Cloak2 playing at Prairie City SVRA...

MetalCloak1 TJ_play at Prairie City OHV.mp4 - YouTube
Very cool. I live nearby there and wheel there every once in a while.
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Old 04-25-2012, 03:32 AM   #12
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is their long travel kit a short arm or long arm kit?
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Old 04-25-2012, 04:48 AM   #13
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Holy JEEP! Thank you for taking my week from me ! Awsome!! Post in JEEP Builders area as well!??
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Old 04-25-2012, 06:31 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NizmoTJ View Post
is their long travel kit a short arm or long arm kit?
Currently they only have the short arm as a complete kit that includes shocks, springs, and CAs. I would call if you are seriously interested. I have not checked their site yet, but it might be such a new setup that they have not even posted the system on their website.
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Old 07-24-2012, 04:17 PM   #15
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i have been reading about this the new stuff for our TJ susp. anyone have any review on there CA's and there track bars?
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Old 11-02-2012, 02:02 PM   #16
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Thought I would share a video of the 6Pak's being built...



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