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Old 08-03-2013, 11:55 AM   #1
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Mobile Radio usage?

Why aren't more vhf/uhf radios used instead of cb's?

Vertex Standard | VX-2200

Vertex Standard | VX-6000

Seems that they have more power, which would give better range... and if i'm not mistaken, the frequency wouldn't require HAM license. Can someone explain?
Thanks.

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Old 08-03-2013, 01:18 PM   #2
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Those VHF frequencies incluse the 2M amateur band, the rest and the UHF are Land Mobile, which is business usage and also requires a license.

Power does not always equal greater range.

These are not for un-licensed usage.

The advantage of CB's are; cheap, easy to use, easy to setup.

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Old 08-03-2013, 01:35 PM   #3
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2 Meters

All Amateurs except Novices:
144.0-144.1 MHz: CW Only
144.1-148.0 MHz: CW, Phone, Image, MCW, RTTY/Data



found it.... must have missed it on the initial search. Thanks for the information!
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Old 08-11-2013, 11:11 PM   #4
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Using a ham radio vs a cb is that ham radios you can find repeaters to bounce you signal off of and gives you more range where as cb is limited. The licensing for a technician license is a very simple test. And lasts for 10 yrs and only cost $7.00 to renew. I have been a ham operator for over 10 yrs. and I wouldn't go back to a cb.
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Old 08-12-2013, 11:44 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by DesertRat78 View Post
Using a ham radio vs a cb is that ham radios you can find repeaters to bounce you signal off of and gives you more range where as cb is limited. The licensing for a technician license is a very simple test. And lasts for 10 yrs and only cost $7.00 to renew. I have been a ham operator for over 10 yrs. and I wouldn't go back to a cb.
Desert, unless you went through somebody, you can renew your license on the FCC website for free.
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Old 08-12-2013, 08:24 PM   #6
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Thx have to remember that the next time I have to renew.
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Old 08-12-2013, 10:09 PM   #7
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The race radio frequencies are in the 150-159 band and I believe are considered commercial channels. Someone told me this is grey area and does not "technically" require licensing because it's outside of the defined HAM 2-meter frequencies.

Can anyone confirm or deny this?
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Old 08-13-2013, 12:57 AM   #8
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I have been a ham operator for over 10 yrs. and I wouldn't go back to a cb.
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Old 08-13-2013, 03:50 AM   #9
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The licensing for a technician license is a very simple test.
maybe if you understand volts, currents, ohms and all that other stuff already. I've been studying for a few weeks now and still don't feel ready.

I build computers, dabble in home and car audio, but none of that requires me knowing how it all works. I guess having a test is a way to weed out the problem makers and see who is really committed to learning the hobby.
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Old 08-13-2013, 06:11 AM   #10
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maybe if you understand volts, currents, ohms and all that other stuff already. I've been studying for a few weeks now and still don't feel ready.

I build computers, dabble in home and car audio, but none of that requires me knowing how it all works. I guess having a test is a way to weed out the problem makers and see who is really committed to learning the hobby.
I thought the tech license was mostly rules and regulations plus ohms law. Atoms, electrons and basics of electricity I got in high school physics class. Maybe they changed those tests around again. I'm an VE but haven't given a test for a few years. I always thought the code test was the hardest for most people.
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Old 08-13-2013, 09:10 AM   #11
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The race radio frequencies are in the 150-159 band and I believe are considered commercial channels. Someone told me this is grey area and does not "technically" require licensing because it's outside of the defined HAM 2-meter frequencies.

Can anyone confirm or deny this?
Not grey at all. There are business frequencies up there that require a license. Some public safety as well. 156 - 157 is VHF maritime. 160 - 161 is rail.
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Old 08-13-2013, 09:37 AM   #12
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The stations are licensed but maybe what he is talking about is individuals that use commercial radio like a policeman or fireman are not licensed. Maybe should be but not usually.
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Old 08-13-2013, 01:43 PM   #13
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Krawdaddy, I'd recommend the ARRL Technician book if you have a few bucks to spare (and you don't have it already). I read through that and did free practice tests on aa9pw.com.

Got my Technician and General on the same day. I read the ARRL book on the General for a week and passed, but I think I got very lucky. That test isn't as easy, especially if you forget your calculator at home.
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Old 08-13-2013, 04:56 PM   #14
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Not grey at all. There are business frequencies up there that require a license. Some public safety as well. 156 - 157 is VHF maritime. 160 - 161 is rail.
Thanks sparky. Do you know anything about 150-152? Those are the "race radio" frequencies. There's a bunch of shops by me that sell the race radios (like the Vertex the OP mentioned) and say that no license is needed for off-road use.
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Old 08-13-2013, 06:07 PM   #15
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Thanks sparky. Do you know anything about 150-152? Those are the "race radio" frequencies. There's a bunch of shops by me that sell the race radios (like the Vertex the OP mentioned) and say that no license is needed for off-road use.
Part 90 of the FCC (iirc) says it has to be a licensed station between 150-174Mhz. Different than amatuer radio, you license an entity (like county ems or an authority like the power company) instead of an individual, then all the firefighters can talk under that license w/o an individual license. This includes 150-152mhz, meaning if your race team had a license you could opperate under it without having one yourself but to buy a radio for offroad w/o a license would be unlawful use. Similar to AM/FM licensing.

Sparky, knower of all things rf, correct me if I am wrong please.

Also, I believe the GMRS/FRS bands require a usage license... can anyone elaborate here?
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Old 08-13-2013, 07:25 PM   #16
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Krawdaddy, I'd recommend the ARRL Technician book if you have a few bucks to spare (and you don't have it already). I read through that and did free practice tests on aa9pw.com.

Got my Technician and General on the same day. I read the ARRL book on the General for a week and passed, but I think I got very lucky. That test isn't as easy, especially if you forget your calculator at home.
thanks.. I bought the Gordon West study guide. Just haven't had a lot of time to study at work lately (work 3rd shift). Last night we had a lot of electrical mtx going on so I sat on the numbers for about 30 minutes and read some
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Old 08-13-2013, 07:40 PM   #17
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I think Gordon West's ham radio courses are the best available, especially if you can get the ones where Gordie talks you through the subject. He has a good sense of humor that makes a dry subject more fun & interesting to learn. I met Gordon at a ham radio show & talked to him at length, he's a very nice guy.

And as a long-term general class ham with both a CB & 2m ham radio in my TJ, I use my CB 99 times for every 1 time I use the 2m ham radio when I'm offroad. Offroad, CB is king.
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Old 08-14-2013, 10:19 AM   #18
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Sparky, knower of all things rf, correct me if I am wrong please.

Also, I believe the GMRS/FRS bands require a usage license... can anyone elaborate here?
You are correct.

GMRS requires a license, FRS does not. They do share some frequencies.

I am going to backpeddle a little hear since memory kicked in.

Up at 151 MHZ there is another unlicensed service called MURS. There are five channels (frequencies) for use, with a max power of 2 watts. It is a bit obscur, you have to look to find the radio's and they are not real cheap.

I agree with Jerry that the best is CB. Inexpensive radios, more off-roaders have them over ham or GMRS/FRS/MURS, sufficient range, and ease of use.

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