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Topic Review (Newest First)
04-15-2014 01:34 PM
AdventureDad Loved the choice of Papas in Beaverton! Thanks. It allowed the kids to play in the play structure while I could pay attention to the discussions and actually participate. Good pizza, too
04-13-2014 01:53 PM
JEEPIT-G [QUOTE="Oregonwolf;9522762"]Wranglers Offroad Group Monthly GTG

The “Wranglers Offroad Group” is having a get together.

Sunday; April 13th, 2014

6:30 pm to 7:00 pm; Mingle, eat pizza, talk to members.
7:00 pm to 7:30 pm; Meeting.
7:30 pm to 8:30 pm; Mingle, eat pizza, talk to members.

Papas Pizza Parlor
15700 Blueridge Dr.
Beaverton, OR 97006

All Jeep Wrangler owners are welcome to attend[/QUOTE

So this meeting is in or this time not in wa
04-02-2014 08:47 PM
Rogue-Tracker
Quote:
Originally Posted by n2jeepn View Post
I’ve been thinking for buying a rear bumper with a tire carrier. Below is a question asked of me from another member? “I want to get a new rear bumper& tire carrier for my TJ. I bought a Smitty Built Mk1 and it destroyed itself in 6 months. I have heard some people like the XRC because the height of the tire can be adjusted quite a bit etc... Any recommendations?” Who has what for a rear bumper/tire carrier, or who has what for a tire carrier? Pros’s/Con’s and likes/dislikes? Would you buy again or buy a different model?
Hey Mark, Carolyn and I returned from the southern deserts last Saturday and hope to make the meeting. As you know I have ended for whatever reason with almost everything SmittyBuilt and so far it has performed well for me with the aggressive crawling in Moab, St George and Parker/Lake Havasu. With regards to rear bumper and tire carrier it has worked out well and as you mentioned tire height is adjustable. So far happy with it and would recommend the quality and price.
Hope to see you and Terri at the meeting - Dennis
04-01-2014 11:57 AM
Oregonwolf
Wranglers Offroad Meet - n -Greet

Wranglers Offroad Group Monthly GTG

The “Wranglers Offroad Group” is having a get together.

Sunday; April 13th, 2014

6:30 pm to 7:00 pm; Mingle, eat pizza, talk to members.
7:00 pm to 7:30 pm; Meeting.
7:30 pm to 8:30 pm; Mingle, eat pizza, talk to members.

Papas Pizza Parlor
15700 Blueridge Dr.
Beaverton, OR 97006

All Jeep Wrangler owners are welcome to attend
03-20-2014 10:19 PM
Teamgreger Another great day in pacific city
03-16-2014 11:54 AM
Keeks911 Anyone recommend a shop in Salem for alignments? Working on the death wobble. Have replaced and changed some things but really need to get it aligned.

Thank you in advance!
03-07-2014 06:12 PM
RUBICON LARRY I have a Rock Hard swing away with dual can carrier and I love it. It is rattle free. It is hard to install and you should get the frame tie ins to support the weight of options. If you do hard core wheelin you may bump the spare tire because its spaced out at the bottom for the high lift jack
03-07-2014 09:38 AM
n2jeepn I’ve been thinking for buying a rear bumper with a tire carrier. Below is a question asked of me from another member?

“I want to get a new rear bumper& tire carrier for my TJ. I bought a Smitty Built Mk1 and it destroyed itself in 6 months. I have heard some people like the XRC because the height of the tire can be adjusted quite a bit etc... Any recommendations?”

Who has what for a rear bumper/tire carrier, or who has what for a tire carrier? Pros’s/Con’s and likes/dislikes? Would you buy again or buy a different model?
02-23-2014 10:38 AM
n2jeepn
Wranglers Off road Monthly get together

The “Wranglers Off Road Group” is having a get together.

Sunday; March 9, 2014

4:30 pm to 5:30 pm; Mingle, eat pizza, talk to members.
5:30 pm to 6:00 pm; Meeting.
6:00 pm to 7:30 pm; Mingle, eat pizza, talk to members.

Leonardo's Pizzeria
16505 SE 1st Street
Vancouver, Washington 98684

All Jeep Wrangler owners are welcome to attend
02-23-2014 09:19 AM
Teamgreger I didn't make it up to sand lake. We came down to paddle board and try to surf. Had a great time in the ocean.
02-23-2014 12:55 AM
Keeks911 Sweet! We are headed there tomorrow! Did you go to Sand Lake? Wondering what the conditions are.
02-22-2014 08:17 PM
Teamgreger What a great weekend at the coast! Shots from Pacific City.
02-18-2014 12:06 AM
IslandTJ LOL, I used the nitrile one to put grease on the splines and where the axle seal rides.
02-17-2014 11:33 PM
chevymad Hey.. your gloves don't match! :lol: Great news you're all fixed up again though.
02-17-2014 10:38 PM
IslandTJ
Quote:
Originally Posted by IslandTJ View Post
lol, I most likely will have have my Jeep up and running by that time...
Jeep is finally running again




02-16-2014 01:20 PM
rusty1 I should have mine back in wheeling condition by then.
02-13-2014 01:27 PM
scoobyjeep going to make it official for saturday march the 29th
02-12-2014 11:38 PM
R51
Quote:
Originally Posted by scoobyjeep View Post
i have the week of march 23rd to the 29th off, i would like to go on a run anyone interested
I can swing the 26th or 27th
02-12-2014 08:25 AM
IslandTJ lol, I most likely will have have my Jeep up and running by that time...
02-12-2014 01:50 AM
JEEPIT-G
Quote:
Originally Posted by scoobyjeep View Post
i have the week of march 23rd to the 29th off, i would like to go on a run anyone interested
What did u have in mind
02-11-2014 10:39 PM
scoobyjeep i have the week of march 23rd to the 29th off, i would like to go on a run anyone interested
02-11-2014 04:57 PM
MojoMark
Quote:
Originally Posted by n2jeepn View Post
Easy Tire Chains & Helpful Hints
In 1996, I attended the SEMA (Specialty Equipment Market Association) show in Las Vegas and looked at the various types of tire chains offered by different manufacturers. After seeing many diverse types of chain construction, I decided that the style of the GRIP 4X4 by RUD-Chain, Inc. seemed to be the most efficient for installation. One of the most important features I was looking for was that, in a sticky situation, they needed to be quick and easy to install. RUD provided me with chains for both my Defender 90 and my Range Rover to test for my purposes.
That article is almost 8 years old... are there any better alternatives?
02-11-2014 12:27 PM
IslandTJ Air down if you don't have chains. 15 psi, IMO is not airing down. I have taken my 33x10.5 down to 8 psi, when wheeling in deep snow.
02-11-2014 11:40 AM
n2jeepn Winter Driving Tips
Winter Driving Tips for On- and Off-Highway by Bill Burke
On-Highway Winter Driving

My home state of Colorado was hit with a massive snow storm that literally shut down the roads from the borders in (November 1997)! DIA couldn’t get any planes off the ground and people couldn’t get out of their driveways to catch their flights! Even my dogs couldn’t get out of our driveway! The Colorado Association of 4WD clubs had to mobilize FEAT, the 4WD emergency assistance team to help shuttle essential service personnel like police, nurses and doctors, city managers and help deliver food and medical supplies to those that were in need. Properly equipped and experienced 4-wheelers certainly helped keep the city moving!

It was the other type of 4-wheelers that hindered and clogged the roadways. You know, the new sport utilities, purchased without training the drivers who had the false impression that 4WD is a panacea for go anywhere ability. They–who sped down the dangerous, slippery roads–thought that the go anywhere vehicles, indeed, could. Except they ended up in the ditches and guard rails of the highways and, not understanding why, abandoned their now useless steeds and sought refuge in front of the fireplace at home until the tow truck delivered their rig safely to the garage.

Let’s talk about this phenomenon of using 4WD ON the highway! Since at least half the country sees some type of snow or ice on the pavement at least half the year, at sometime, somewhere, there are people using 4WD on the highway.

REMEMBER that 4WD is not really 4WD. It is only 2WD.

In theory, and using computer models developed by engineers, the 4WD drivetrain is 4WD. All four tires get some amount of torsional relationship via the drivetrain. In reality, it is only two tires (when the transfer case is in 4WD mode) getting the full benefit of power application from the engine. I’m not here to start a debate about how much torque goes to which tire, but to shed some light about traction conditions when driving what a majority of people think is really 4-wheel drive!

When in 4WD mode on the snowy, icy highways, the vehicle can stop no better than before. The increased traction and forward control (to a degree anyway) is actually reduced by the lack of stopping power due to road conditions. Driving like we have all the traction in the world only gets us in the ditch, upside down, in the guard rail, under a trailer rig and usually in a lot of trouble!

Sitting up high should offer us better reaction time than the average Honda Accord. Instead it gives us a false sense of control and we push that reaction time and the rules of spacing for X miles per hour and the “2 second rule” for distance and brake reaction time to the point that we end up running over the little Geo Metro that somehow we forgot was right in front of us. Because we have that commanding view of the road ahead and can see the goings on way ahead, it means we have a chance to prove we are attentive, aware and capable drivers.

The boon of ABS brakes has helped save many people from disastrous consequences. Some of the “old school” drivers have a hard time relating to the new style of braking. If you have ABS brakes, read the owners manual about how to use them properly. Some vehicles have only rear wheel ABS some have all wheel ABS. Generally, if you have ABS and need to stop quickly, hit the brake pedal and hold your foot down (feeling the weird pulses is normal) until the vehicle is stopped or you gain control of the situation. In the “old days,” we were taught to feather, pump, lightly drag the brakes when in a “panic” stop situation. This is still true if you do not have ABS. Practice “panic” stops if you have ABS. Get used to the way the brake pedal feels when “pulsing.” In the winter time, go to a snowy and icy vacant parking lot and practice skid control. Learn to turn into the skid. Learn how much pressure to use on the brakes. Learn how to use the ABS when controlling the skid. It takes practice to be able to handle on-highway avoidance techniques when they count. Watch out for parking buttons and sewer covers in the vacant lots!

If you are going to shift the transfer case into 4WD mode on the pavement, make sure you have some slippage. Yes, the tires must be able to “slip” sometimes. If you do not get slippage, you will get what is called “wind-up.” Wind-up is the condition where the front end drivetrain pushes against the rear end drivetrain right about in the middle, or the transfer case. The gear train in the transfer case gets bound up and can cause the rig to come to a stop like someone was holding the vehicle back with a tow rope. Worst case is the transfer case could break or you could twist a drive shaft. Usually, though, the rig will start to slow down for no apparent cause. The remedy is to shift into reverse and back up for a short distance (safely) and “un-wind” the gear case then shift out of 4WD mode.

Some vehicles offer “full-time” 4WD. They will usually have a viscous coupling in the transfer case that allows some slipping of the drive train when on dry pavement. This system allows for one (1) tire to “look” for traction. You can literally feel the vehicle searching for traction at one of the tires. It is a kind of a surge effect that rotates from wheel to wheel.

With part-time 4WD, you will have to shift into 4WD mode to have the advantage of the front axle traction. Some vehicles will allow the “shift on the fly” move, at speeds up to 50 mph. Be careful doing this, as the sudden gain in traction and the sudden torsional force to the front axle could cause a slide or spin losing control.

Tires are another mitigating factor in traction on wintry pavement. Research has proven that specific tires like the “Blizzak” are better in snow and ice conditions than studded snow tires. I like using the BF Goodrich Radial All-Terrain tires in snow conditions. They have a lot of siping and offer very good control.

Studs in tires are a good idea, but must be used carefully. Although forward traction is usually good, if in a slide, the steel will allow for less resistance to stopping than bare rubber. Also when starting out, the tires with studs are more likely to spin, causing lost traction. Lots of siping is the key to good snow tires. Tire chains are, of course, the ultimate traction device for snow and ice. They require time to put on and take off and can’t be driven over 30MPH.

Driving on snow and ice covered roads is different than ‘wheeling on the trail. Heading up to the slopes for a weekend of skiing or over the bridges to grandmother’s house for turkey does take a certain amount of caution and driving finesse. When on the highway, pay attention to traffic patterns ahead, anticipate road conditions, have your rig properly equipped for winter travel with good snow tires, emergency supplies, and tire chains.

Off-Highway Winter Driving

I talked about snow chain use in my last article. I have been on snow and ice covered trails with the BFG Mud T/A’s on my rig and have had a stock Discovery do much better with the BFG A/T’s than my lockers and all the mods I have. That is when I put the chains on. Why mess around?

When driving off-highway in the snow and ice, use common sense. Deep powder can and does hide stumps, rocks, logs and icy patches. Early season snow usually is easier to push through than late season stuff. That is because the late season snow has built from additional snowstorms. It has a hard layer in between the soft snow and presents problems due to this hard layer.

Sometimes it’s easier to drive across the deep snow with high flotation tires. I’ve seen very low geared rigs with big fat tires float across 20 foot drifts only to have a less experienced driver chew the drift up with chains. That makes it hard to come back over for the others. Sometimes it is best to do the snow trips past midnight when the snow has a chance to freeze or “set up.” You can drive over the snow more easily. Just remember how deep it really is when you’re in the middle of a 15 foot drift that spans across a 200 meter ridge. Believe me, it’s no fun digging a rig out of 15 feet of snow for 200 meters when you’re in jeans and sneakers! Try to stay on top if that’s where you started. Chains are great for the snow that is usually up to 3 feet deep. Of course, it depends on if it’s fresh powder and how hard the bottom is.

Be aware of snow packing under the rig. It can literally freeze your engine solid, even if it is running. Snow bashing is hard on the rig. Slow speeds, snow clogged radiator and packed snow around the engine will ruin a tough truck in a minute. Make sure the engine area is cleared out often and pay attention to the transmission/transfer case oil temperatures as well as the diff oil temp. Watch for chunks of ice and hard snow getting caught under the rig and severing brake lines. In creek crossings, watch for ice flow and frozen brakes. Keep the engine running as much as possible when snow 4-wheeling. I have seen a distributor crack due to moisture build-up and freezing when the engine was turned off. Wet fan belts and wet brakes can freeze and will cause damage.

The lead vehicle should swap off often with others in the convoy as breaking trail is hard on the rig and driver. Plus the others behind get bored watching the leader smash forward then back up, etc. Let them have some fun also.

I sometimes drive forward slowly and set a path, then back up. Drive forward some more, then back. Kind of like two steps forward one back type of thing. If you have chains, you may just want to let them churn slowly with slow, steady progress forward.

If you’re going to run chains, keep the tires inflated to normal highway pressure. DO NOT air down with chains.

When running chains and you encounter rocks, ledges, etc., BE CAREFUL, the chains will slip easily on the rocks, especially on downhill descents. You will have very little control on solid rock faces with chains. Anticipate this! With chains on, you’ll also up the damage potential if not paying attention for roots, stumps, etc. The chains can catch if they are loose and cause a broken hub or axle.

On off-camber trails, I will keep the lockers off, drive very slowly and let the tires get traction.

You may slip off to the side and the hard snow will prevent you from getting back in alignment. I will usually back up and then get out and stomp a channel so my tires can stay on the trail and not follow the ruts I dug previously with the tires in the deep snow.

Be extra aware of the center of steering. The wheels can get full turn easily and they will fight you for control. Keep slow and steady, with the wheels getting traction aimed straight ahead.

For both on – and off-highway winter driving, having your rig properly
tuned and winterized is important:

Check the antifreeze – flush and refill to manufacturer’s specs.
Inspect the hoses – replace if squishy.
Look at the belts – replace if they are cracked or glazed over.
Tune the engine – check the wires, distributor cap, coil output.
Change to winter weight oil according to manufacturer’s specs.
Check or change gear oils and other drivetrain reservoirs.
The moisture built up over the past summer from the mudbogs
and water crossings can freeze in the differentials.
Check the tire pressures – is the spare tire up to snuff?
How about the wheel bearings, brakes, power steering, air filter,
fuel filter, heater controls, door hinges and locks, wiper blades
and washer fluid.
Inspect the exhaust system for holes and leaks – remember that cold weather means closed windows and a leaky exhaust system can put
you into a deep sleep!
Put together an emergency kit in a duffle bag or small container that consists of: road flares, wool blanket or two, jumper cables, energy snacks, small cook stove and some soup packets (if you don’t have water, you can melt snow), small cook pot, thick socks, hat, mittens, medications, tire chains, snow shovel, candle, lighter and matches, flashlight and radio with good batteries, a good book and whatever other personal items you deem necessary.
02-11-2014 11:39 AM
n2jeepn Easy Tire Chains & Helpful Hints
Get a GRIP in the Snow: Easy Tire Chains & Some Helpful Hints! by Bill Burke

Snow 4-wheeling is great, chilling fun, and coldly challenging. In the wintry Colorado back country (and many other parts of the world) where the first snow usually falls in October, then stays til late June, early July, where sometimes high mountain passes like Pearl Pass and Webster Pass stay closed til mid-September, it can be finger-numbing and downright dangerous.

We’ve all seen the TV commercials for the winter sales of the fancy new 4WD bounding across snow fields, blasting fresh powder all over the camera! It looks like such fun! One problem with this scenario is that you have to watch out for tree stumps and rocks hidden by the deep, fresh powder. Blast across some meadows and your tire could get shoved under your rig, bending the rim and flattening the tire. OUCH!

Be careful when the momentum factor carries you away. Too fast, and the rig will slide off the trail. The ice under the snow will ensure that. You can be “clipping” down a trail in deep powder, come into a turn, try to negotiate the turn and the rig continues straight. Here is where tire chains come in handy. This article is going to talk about what I feel are some of the most important pieces of equipment to help get you and your rig ready for the winter trail, tire chains in general, and the GRIP 4X4 chains specifically.

In 1996, I attended the SEMA (Specialty Equipment Market Association) show in Las Vegas and looked at the various types of tire chains offered by different manufacturers. After seeing many diverse types of chain construction, I decided that the style of the GRIP 4X4 by RUD-Chain, Inc. seemed to be the most efficient for installation. One of the most important features I was looking for was that, in a sticky situation, they needed to be quick and easy to install. RUD provided me with chains for both my Defender 90 and my Range Rover to test for my purposes.

I usually use chains whenever I do any back country driving in the snow–4 tires, 4 chains. I’ve even written articles in the past on how to install tire chains, when to use them, and how to keep them from twisting up. But, now I’ve found a much better way!

The GRIP 4X4 chains are the easiest I’ve ever put on! They have a plastic encased steel cable on the inside of the tire that helps locate the cross bar links, and helps keep the chain from hitting the springs or radius rod when turning the front wheels. They also have chain links that connect the cross bar links. This would be considered a modified diamond pattern. These run parallel with the tire and help keep the vehicle from sliding sideways like standard ladder style chains.

Although it is a good idea to roll down the road about 50 feet and make sure the chains are properly tensioned, in a tight spot like I had on the trail they worked just fine without doing this.

It’s as simple as sliding the chain behind the tire, bringing the inner cable connector up to the top and making the connection for the inner link, then connecting the outer link, straightening the chain on the tire, pulling the tensioning chain through the locking mechanism, pulling tight, then hooking it to an appropriate link to keep the chain tensioned.

I was in my Range Rover and a little abusive to the chains during an excursion up Left Hand Canyon in Boulder, Colorado on a very snowy and cold Saturday in January. It was quite miserable weather, prime conditions and a great trail to test a set of chains–they worked really well on the open-diff Range Rover. Sometimes running open-diffs in snow and ice conditions is better than using lockers, as lockers tend to slide you sideways. Although, with the GRIP 4X4′s design, side slip is minimized. Another feature I like is the GRIP 4X4′s are reversible, so the chains last longer, unlike standard ladder-type chains that cannot be reversed.

Chains can also be used for worn or non-aggressive tread tires when the trail turns to mud or loose rock. They can make your rig into a little tractor! If you can only afford one set, and you’re going to be in 4WD on a trail, I recommend putting them on the front axle since you have steering, braking, and traction. However, be careful on long descents since you’re getting such good traction with the front end, and the rear is not chained, it may swing around on you. So it might be better for those descents to chain up the rear. That’s why I like RUD chains because they are so easy to move around.

Other suggestions for using chains include:

1. Use caution with spinning the tires, as the chains may catch on unseen stumps, rocks, and roots, and you could brake an axle or a hub.

2. Check the trail ahead in deep snow for hidden obstacles.

3. Inspect chains before and after each outing. Look for worn links and stretched connectors.

4. Spray chains with some WD40 after each use. Make sure the chains don’t rust. Don’t leave them in a pile!

5. Be careful when steering with the front end articulated. Keep the chains from contacting vehicle components.

6. Remember, chains will allow you to dig to the trail through deep snow and ice. Watch for high-centering in those conditions. Sometimes, through very deep, hard-packed snow, I have used soft, high flotation tires to go across the top of deep drifts in lieu of chains. Then I’ve aired up to put the chains back on.

7. Do not use bare hands on cold, icy chains. Use heavy-duty neoprene/rubber gloves or good leather work gloves to put chains on.

8. Drive very slow and deliberate with chains on to gain proper traction and control on the icy trail.

9. Occasionally, I’ll use higher RPM’s in lower gears to keep the chains “churning.” This breaks the ice in hard-pack snow so the vehicle can gain traction on the trail.

Whether you use your rig to navigate wintry streets to get groceries and the kids to school, or winch to that great ice fishing spot, you need to be prepared for any incident. Winter is nothing to be trifled with. Have the proper equipment and a plan on how to use it, if necessary. You can have all the gear in the world, but it’s no good if you don’t know how to use it and you don’t have a plan! Get proper training in vehicle operation. Take some emergency training through your local Red Cross office. Be aware of your limitations and those of your vehicle.

No matter what kind of rig you own, from stock showroom vehicle to the most radical of off-road machines, you must always check it out before heading to the hills. You can prepare a checklist to be sure you have seasonal items that maybe wouldn’t make it into your kit other times of the year. I built a shelf in my garage to hold the off-season items. That way, it goes in the vehicle and when I’m done, it goes right back on the shelf in its place. I think it was Confucius who said: “A place for everything and everything in its place,” or maybe it was my drill sergeant.

It sure is a winter wonderland out there…quiet, peaceful and scenic. The best part about winter 4-wheeling is the lack of bugs and people competing for campsites! Be prepared, stay safe, and don’t be a stick-in-the-mud (or snow)!
02-11-2014 11:20 AM
R51
Quote:
Originally Posted by JEEPIT-G View Post
Nooooooooo it can't be true we have jeeps
I love this. I had the same thought.
02-06-2014 09:10 AM
JEEPIT-G
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oregonwolf View Post
DUE TO THE UPCOMING WINTER STORM, WE HAVE CANCELED THIS MONTHS MEET-n-GREET.

After watching the weather reports of the Upcoming Winter Storm, we have deiced for the safety of all of our members to cancel this meeting.

The Meet-n-Greet for March 9th, 2014 will be at the same time and place.
Nooooooooo it can't be true we have jeeps
02-06-2014 09:05 AM
Oregonwolf DUE TO THE UPCOMING WINTER STORM, WE HAVE CANCELED THIS MONTHS MEET-n-GREET.

After watching the weather reports of the Upcoming Winter Storm, we have deiced for the safety of all of our members to cancel this meeting.

The Meet-n-Greet for March 9th, 2014 will be at the same time and place.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Oregonwolf View Post
The “Wranglers Offroad Group” is having a get together.

Sunday; February 9th, 2014

4:30 pm to 5:30 pm; Mingle, eat pizza, talk to members.
5:30 pm to 6:00 pm; Meeting.
6:00 pm to 7:30 pm; Mingle, eat pizza, talk to members.

Leonardo's Pizzeria
16505 SE 1st Street
Vancouver, Washington 98684

All Jeep Wrangler owners are welcome to attend
01-27-2014 12:56 PM
Oregonwolf
Wranglers Offroad Group Monthly GTG

The “Wranglers Offroad Group” is having a get together.

Sunday; February 9th, 2014

4:30 pm to 5:30 pm; Mingle, eat pizza, talk to members.
5:30 pm to 6:00 pm; Meeting.
6:00 pm to 7:30 pm; Mingle, eat pizza, talk to members.

Leonardo's Pizzeria
16505 SE 1st Street
Vancouver, Washington 98684

All Jeep Wrangler owners are welcome to attend
01-20-2014 01:17 PM
n2jeepn Please do not post "OPEN runs on this thread. If you would like to have an open run start a new thread. This thread is for wrangler only runs. Thanks
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