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Topic Review (Newest First)
10-02-2007 04:31 PM
KA5IVR
Quote:
Originally Posted by skeeter View Post
Congrats KA5IVR, let me know whether you want a mug or a membership and we'll get that going for you.
Thanks Skeeter & Amy. The Mug with a TJ would be great.

Although the contest has ended, hopefully anyone else with Kits or Ideas will still post them. MSWILDER had several good pointers and those are always appreciated.
10-01-2007 05:30 PM
1BLKJP
Quote:
Originally Posted by skeeter View Post
Thank you to everyone that participated.
Picking a winner was difficult, there were three very good kits that made it down to final consideration.

mswilder, hardy1531 and KA5IVR.

And special mention for noise for bringing enough oregano to make us all some special spaghetti or some bitch'n brownies, and to SPDSNYPR for being prepared to hunt us down and steal/err confiscate our food and water for the greater good

The idea for this contest was to get some examples of useful, useable kits to give people with no experience an idea how to set something up for themselves. Amy and I agree that KA5IVR's presentation does that the best.
Congrats KA5IVR, let me know whether you want a mug or a membership and we'll get that going for you.

I'd really like to thank mswilder for offering to help others with ideas for their kits.
Skeeter and Amy, Thank you both for putting this together and getting everyone in the spirit of being safer and more prepared on the trails. You never know when it will be your time to have an unfortunate incident and it's the prepared ones that can shake it off and deal with it like nothing's doin.

Congratulations to you KA5IVR.
10-01-2007 03:26 PM
skeeter Thank you to everyone that participated.
Picking a winner was difficult, there were three very good kits that made it down to final consideration.

mswilder, hardy1531 and KA5IVR.

And special mention for noise for bringing enough oregano to make us all some special spaghetti or some bitch'n brownies, and to SPDSNYPR for being prepared to hunt us down and steal/err confiscate our food and water for the greater good

The idea for this contest was to get some examples of useful, useable kits to give people with no experience an idea how to set something up for themselves. Amy and I agree that KA5IVR's presentation does that the best.
Congrats KA5IVR, let me know whether you want a mug or a membership and we'll get that going for you.

I'd really like to thank mswilder for offering to help others with ideas for their kits.
10-01-2007 02:19 PM
kg4kpg So, who won? Lucky dog.
10-01-2007 07:28 AM
kg4kpg Man, I was going to get my kit picture uploaded yeaterday before the inlaws came over but got distracted. Oh well, good luck entrants.
09-30-2007 11:00 PM
mswilder well its the same thing its just not writtin out in list form.
09-30-2007 10:55 PM
skeeter if you want to update your entry, by all means do so.
09-30-2007 10:37 PM
mswilder well I wished i could of gotten better pics of my stuff, but I didnt have a digital camera to do that with. as for a list of items, skeeter did you want that or are you going to go by what I have already posted. also I am working on the first survial tips but I havent had much time and what I am planning is taking longer to type because it is a big subject(but I am thinking about cutting it down and making it a two part) so just stand by. also BTW I am glad to report that my squadron just finishied our ground team academy and now I have all the missions and required items (skills) to be quailified as a GTM1 (ground team member level 1) and GTL (Ground team leader), some of you might compare this to SARtech 2 and ADSAR by the NASAR text. I am completely quailfied to carry my own team out on any kind of search useing all the available resorces like search dog teams, airplane and helicopter search grids, and medi-evac site clearance and landing. so if you are in AR, southern MI, eastern OK, or northen TX and you become lost odds are I will be on or leading one of the teams coming to find you!!! Have fun, be safe and I hope we never have to meet under these circumstances.
09-30-2007 12:35 PM
skeeter
Quote:
SEATTLE, Washington (AP) -- A sheriff has ordered a review of the 911 calls made about a woman who spent more than a week missing before search crews found her trapped in the wreckage of her sport-utility vehicle.

King County Sheriff Sue Rahr's order comes after Tanya Rider's husband complained that he had to fight to get authorities to launch a search for his wife.

Tom Rider said he asked the sheriff's office last weekend to use cell phone technology to try to find his wife, but was told she couldn't be categorized as a missing person because she wasn't a minor, suicidal or mentally ill.

Authorities found the Maple Valley woman after detecting the general location of her cell phone Thursday morning, then searching along a highway southeast of Seattle. See how cell phone tracking works »

Tanya Rider's car had tumbled about 20 feet down a ravine and lay buried below brush and blackberry bushes. The air bags deployed, but she was injured and trapped. Rescuers had to cut the roof off to get her out.

"I know there were delays (in finding her) because of red tape," Tom Rider said. Rider said he also drove the route where his wife was found but didn't see any sign of a crash. He also offered a $25,000 reward for any information leading to her safe return.

"It's not that we didn't take him seriously," Deputy Rodney C. Chinnick said.

"We don't take every missing person report on adults. ... If we did, we'd be doing nothing but going after missing person reports."

Rahr said her department gets up to 700 missing persons reports a year, and the vast majority involve people who fail to come home on time or "an adult who wants to leave on their own accord."

Nevertheless, Rahr said she takes Tom Rider's concerns seriously.

"I want to know if he tried to report this and we made a mistake," Rahr said. "If we made a mistake, we're going to address that."

Tanya Rider, 33, remained in critical condition Saturday at a Seattle hospital where she was being treated for kidney failure and other injuries.

Copyright 2007 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.
Find this article at:
http://www.cnn.com/2007/US/09/29/wom...ef=mpstoryview




Today is the last day to post a presentation of your emergency kit.
09-26-2007 12:36 PM
skeeter Good info, thank you.
Water has always been an odd issue for me. I grew up where I was never more than an hours walk from some type of flowing water so I never gave it much thought. I always drank strait out of creeks and streams without a problem but then again, I traveled a bit in Mexico and never got Montazuma's revenge either so maybe I just have an iron gut.
Anyway, we usually have a few bottles of water in the Jeep that we rotate out every few months and when we go exploring we take extra for everyone.
We've discussed getting a filter but due to where we live and play it hasn't really been high on the list of necessities. If we lived in the Southwest or Midwest I would definitely have one. I don't like the water purification tabs because it makes the water taste like crap, doesn't kill everything that might make you ill, does nothing for solids or chemical contamination and it's not good for you.
I also want to add a rack on my back bumper to carry a 5 gallon jug for camping.
09-20-2007 11:01 PM
KA5IVR
Quote:
Originally Posted by OdhinnsChick View Post
I'd be interested in what he says. I pretty much only drink bottled water so I need to know these things!
I had an interesting discussion with the lab geek (plant’s biologist). Found out he use to have a Jeep in college and wants another, so we are buddies now.

First I told him how all this came up and showed him what I did. His response was it probably was ok to do that, since I was not introducing “outside elements” into the water. He said that the seal on the bottle top may or may not seal properly again a second time and most of the new style bottles have enough expansion room in case they do freeze, so not worry about that. I kept mine in a ziploc for double containment anyway, if one did get a leak. He did say that I should make sure to rotate the bottled water like I do other items in the kit because certain Hydrocarbon Vapors (gas fumes) may be able to penetrate the Polyethylene Plastic bottles. And if you long term store it, it should be in a cool dark place away sunlight, preferably refrigerated.

He stated there are a lot of Urban Myths about bacteria in Bottled Water. If the water is bottled under the FDA standards, the water is disinfected through several processes and it is safe as long “outside elements” are not introduced. He said a lot of people open a bottle, drink from it, and let it sit in a hot car for a few days. The outside element is saliva from the backwash into the bottle and then bacteria will grow in the warm and wet environment. He said if you don’t consume the water in one setting, you should refrigerant it like you would any sort of food product.

He also said not to reuse Single Use containers to store water. Old sports drink bottles, milk jugs, etc. These are almost impossible to remove all of the fats and sugars for water storage without the chance of possible bacteria growth. He said a lot of people use old milk jugs for cold water in the refrigerator. He said either get a new plastic container made for that purpose or use a glass container and make sure each time you wash it, let it dry completely inside before filling it again.

I replaced the bottled water in my pack and MSWILDER seems to have the best idea to just take fresh water each time out.
09-20-2007 08:01 AM
OdhinnsChick
Quote:
Originally Posted by KA5IVR View Post
Well even though I squeezed all of the air out of the bottles, I will replace them with new unopened ones. I don't have to worry about freezing now anyway. Better safe than sorry.

Because of this discussion, I'll going to ask the biologist at work about this. It happens to be at one of the large nationwide bottled water companies, so they should know. This should be an interesting answer. That guy is one of those egghead lab coat wearing strange types.
I'd be interested in what he says. I pretty much only drink bottled water so I need to know these things!
09-20-2007 08:00 AM
Odhinn I still feel that it should be a requirement for people to take sort of survival training class in school. I know with the training I have had if we (I and the Family) were lost and somehow without supplies, I could find us food, water, and build a shelter to survive. I am amazed to this day that I still find people (adults) that think that safe food is only at the grocery store and nothing in nature is safe to eat or those that think technology will allow them to be rescued within hours so they don't prepare properly.
09-20-2007 06:23 AM
foxinthemudd great statement!!! ^^^^
09-19-2007 04:31 PM
hardy1531 Skeeter, I totally agree with you. I work Full Time as a Firefighter and I Volunteer my Off time as a Firefighter. We see some crazy stuff. About once a week during the summer we are called out to search for a Missing persons. We work with EMS and local SO. The County fire department (my Volunteer department) does training on SAR. It is nuts how little people are prepared, and freak out. We are always searching the local creeks, rivers and quarrys for someone who went out and didn't have a plan. I know that me and family could surrvive in a emergency situation. The most important thing someone can do is remain calm!

Hardy
09-19-2007 10:46 AM
Odhinn
Quote:
Originally Posted by skeeter View Post
That's why I think it's so important. Most people seem to have this idea that if something happens the government is going to come in and save them. After all, that's why we pay taxes right? well, the government will attempt to help IF They know there's a problem, IF they have the funding, IF they have the resources, IF you are important enough, IF they aren't busy.
Even if they come to find you it may take days before they can get you.
Initial survival is the responsibility of the individual. The longer you can take care of yourself, the better chance you have of surviving anything.

I've been driving truck for about 20 years now, I've seen all kinds of bad situations and I've seen lots of otherwise rational, intelligent people turn into blithering idiots because they either didn't know what to do or didn't have the tools to handle a situation.
I've seen chain reaction wrecks in the middle of a blizzard in Wyoming where it took all day before they could clear the highway enough to get rescue crews in.
I've seen wild fires just this summer drive an entire community from their homes in the middle of the night.
I've seen a train derailment that drove an entire town out in the middle of the night due to a chlorine spill and they weren't allowed back for a week.
I've seen Blizzards and ice storms shut roads down for days and leave people stranded.
I've seen avalanches do the same, there was an avalanche on I84 that trapped several vehicles under an underpass for a couple days.
I've hauled relief supplies in for Katrina.
I've hauled relief supplies in for the wild fires in California a few years ago.
I hauled relief supplies for the Loma Prieta earth quake.
In all those situations people were wandering around with no clue what to do and with nothing of their own, completely reliant on the generosity of others.
I've seen people stranded in their cars with no food, no water, no blankets traveling through mountains and deserts and they never gave a thought to what might happen till they were stranded. If somebody hadn't come along to help they would have been screwed for want of less than $50 worth of preparedness.
Last winter there was a guy from California that took a wrong turn in Oregon and got his family lost for a week, they nearly starved to death. He died trying to walk for help. He died less than a mile from his family.
There was a couple guys down in California that went out to test out a new buggy one summer, one of em rolled and was injured, the other went for help but couldn't find his way back, by the time they found him he was dead.
There was a couple a few weeks ago out hunting, they had car trouble and the husband decided to walk out, by the time he got help and got back, several days later, his wife was in bad shape, last I heard she was the hospital in critical condition.

Emergencies can and do happen anytime and anywhere, there's no reason not to take a little time and prepare yourself a little insurance.
Well said skeeter.
09-19-2007 10:30 AM
skeeter That's why I think it's so important. Most people seem to have this idea that if something happens the government is going to come in and save them. After all, that's why we pay taxes right? well, the government will attempt to help IF They know there's a problem, IF they have the funding, IF they have the resources, IF you are important enough, IF they aren't busy.
Even if they come to find you it may take days before they can get you.
Initial survival is the responsibility of the individual. The longer you can take care of yourself, the better chance you have of surviving anything.

I've been driving truck for about 20 years now, I've seen all kinds of bad situations and I've seen lots of otherwise rational, intelligent people turn into blithering idiots because they either didn't know what to do or didn't have the tools to handle a situation.
I've seen chain reaction wrecks in the middle of a blizzard in Wyoming where it took all day before they could clear the highway enough to get rescue crews in.
I've seen wild fires just this summer drive an entire community from their homes in the middle of the night.
I've seen a train derailment that drove an entire town out in the middle of the night due to a chlorine spill and they weren't allowed back for a week.
I've seen Blizzards and ice storms shut roads down for days and leave people stranded.
I've seen avalanches do the same, there was an avalanche on I84 that trapped several vehicles under an underpass for a couple days.
I've hauled relief supplies in for Katrina.
I've hauled relief supplies in for the wild fires in California a few years ago.
I hauled relief supplies for the Loma Prieta earth quake.
In all those situations people were wandering around with no clue what to do and with nothing of their own, completely reliant on the generosity of others.
I've seen people stranded in their cars with no food, no water, no blankets traveling through mountains and deserts and they never gave a thought to what might happen till they were stranded. If somebody hadn't come along to help they would have been screwed for want of less than $50 worth of preparedness.
Last winter there was a guy from California that took a wrong turn in Oregon and got his family lost for a week, they nearly starved to death. He died trying to walk for help. He died less than a mile from his family.
There was a couple guys down in California that went out to test out a new buggy one summer, one of em rolled and was injured, the other went for help but couldn't find his way back, by the time they found him he was dead.
There was a couple a few weeks ago out hunting, they had car trouble and the husband decided to walk out, by the time he got help and got back, several days later, his wife was in bad shape, last I heard she was the hospital in critical condition.

Emergencies can and do happen anytime and anywhere, there's no reason not to take a little time and prepare yourself a little insurance.
09-18-2007 11:26 PM
foxinthemudd
Quote:
Originally Posted by mswilder View Post
you want to know something funny, It just dawned on me, I am a search and rescue field medic, and the reason you are having this "contest" is for you to have a pack allowing you to be able to survive long enough for me or people like me to come and find you!!!! well that the Ironic part, here is the surprising part. appox. 90% of the SAR that are performed in the US is lead by the county sheriff, Well I don’t know about your county but the one I live in that is pretty scary, all the deputies, VFD, and police which have NO SAR training are the ones leading the searches. Now here you are lost and trying to survive on what ever it is that you packed and there is the sheriff of the county you are in trying to find you, a plastic pin in a massive round bail of hay and he is using a metal detector, that is about what it amounts to. Here is an interesting fact, I just joined another SAR team (Crawford county SAR team) here is a SAR team with national SAR training that is established within a county and we are trying to get funding to get the better training and better equipment and so on and so forth. we put together a proposal to get grant money for these things and guess who the first person is to oppose this proposal, THE SHERIFF!!!!!! He is so worried that if we are given the grant that it would take out of his "pubic services fund" (which is what the sheriffs office runs off of). here it is again the same sheriff that is using the Metal detector to find a plastic pin, is not wanting to spend money for a trained team to come in and find his pin for him in a professional and timely manner. Here is the other, I am in an organization (civil air patrol) and we are not assoc. with any county, most don’t even know we exist, so therefore we don’t get utilized yet we have the training, equipment and personnel to do an effective search, and yet the sheriff doesn’t utilize the resources he has, whether it is CAP which is free to him, or the county SAR that is also well trained and good at what we do.

True story, a county which will remain nameless had an 85 Y/O F, not show up at a family something or another and they reported here missing, well they found her truck still running, was stuck in the mud on the side of a dirt road, the sheriffs setup a command post and they searched for 7 day then said "it has been 7 day and there is no way she is alive now, we are closing off the search and hopefully her body will turn up" 2 months later a dog brings up a piece of a human, they followed the dog and it took them to where the body was. The lady was less the 1/2 mile from where her truck was about 10 ft from the side of the road under fallen tree limb that she was using as a shelter!!!!!

the moral of this story, If you are interested then get involved with your local county SAR team and learn the tricks and trade for searching (yes we do use ATVs and jeeps are real assets to these teams). Also if there is ever a bill/proposal for a county Emergency Management system please vote and make it happen. Because remember if you get lost you are depending on that sheriff that doesn’t want to spend money to find you and will be looking for that plastic pin in the hay stack with a metal detector!!!!!!
in the SO where I work we have a SAR team who train a few times every month on searches, repelling, tracking, and survival. they do a damn good job if I do say. my little brother is part of that SAR group, needless to say I was pretty impressed with the setup they have.
09-18-2007 11:02 PM
Levinoss Scary =/

~Lev
09-18-2007 10:47 PM
mswilder
Ha! Ha!

you want to know something funny, It just dawned on me, I am a search and rescue field medic, and the reason you are having this "contest" is for you to have a pack allowing you to be able to survive long enough for me or people like me to come and find you!!!! well that the Ironic part, here is the surprising part. appox. 90% of the SAR that are performed in the US is lead by the county sheriff, Well I don’t know about your county but the one I live in that is pretty scary, all the deputies, VFD, and police which have NO SAR training are the ones leading the searches. Now here you are lost and trying to survive on what ever it is that you packed and there is the sheriff of the county you are in trying to find you, a plastic pin in a massive round bail of hay and he is using a metal detector, that is about what it amounts to. Here is an interesting fact, I just joined another SAR team (Crawford county SAR team) here is a SAR team with national SAR training that is established within a county and we are trying to get funding to get the better training and better equipment and so on and so forth. we put together a proposal to get grant money for these things and guess who the first person is to oppose this proposal, THE SHERIFF!!!!!! He is so worried that if we are given the grant that it would take out of his "pubic services fund" (which is what the sheriffs office runs off of). here it is again the same sheriff that is using the Metal detector to find a plastic pin, is not wanting to spend money for a trained team to come in and find his pin for him in a professional and timely manner. Here is the other, I am in an organization (civil air patrol) and we are not assoc. with any county, most don’t even know we exist, so therefore we don’t get utilized yet we have the training, equipment and personnel to do an effective search, and yet the sheriff doesn’t utilize the resources he has, whether it is CAP which is free to him, or the county SAR that is also well trained and good at what we do.

True story, a county which will remain nameless had an 85 Y/O F, not show up at a family something or another and they reported here missing, well they found her truck still running, was stuck in the mud on the side of a dirt road, the sheriffs setup a command post and they searched for 7 day then said "it has been 7 day and there is no way she is alive now, we are closing off the search and hopefully her body will turn up" 2 months later a dog brings up a piece of a human, they followed the dog and it took them to where the body was. The lady was less the 1/2 mile from where her truck was about 10 ft from the side of the road under fallen tree limb that she was using as a shelter!!!!!

the moral of this story, If you are interested then get involved with your local county SAR team and learn the tricks and trade for searching (yes we do use ATVs and jeeps are real assets to these teams). Also if there is ever a bill/proposal for a county Emergency Management system please vote and make it happen. Because remember if you get lost you are depending on that sheriff that doesn’t want to spend money to find you and will be looking for that plastic pin in the hay stack with a metal detector!!!!!!
09-18-2007 08:15 PM
skeeter
Quote:
Originally Posted by Odhinn View Post
KA5IVR just outclassed most of our kits, I suspect. I know mine won't compete with it. Very nice, and well thought out kit.
Still have almost 2 weeks to upgrade.
09-18-2007 08:13 PM
skeeter
Quote:
Originally Posted by KA5IVR View Post
Vehicle Survival Kit:
***snip***
Wow, excellent presentation and well thought out kit.

Thank you.
09-18-2007 07:55 PM
KA5IVR Well even though I squeezed all of the air out of the bottles, I will replace them with new unopened ones. I don't have to worry about freezing now anyway. Better safe than sorry.

Because of this discussion, I'll going to ask the biologist at work about this. It happens to be at one of the large nationwide bottled water companies, so they should know. This should be an interesting answer. That guy is one of those egghead lab coat wearing strange types.
09-18-2007 06:03 PM
mswilder a very impressive pack I must say, the supplementation is a good idea, and I am sure alot of the is tried and true for you and that is great. As for the platic bottles bactieria it not a matter of light and dark but a matter of O2. First the bottles are sealed less likely to get bacteria in, but when you open them they are exposed and even when you close them the bacteria is still in there. As for the O2 some bacteria can grow in the absence of O2 and those can actully be the more deadly ones when introduced into the body. All aside your best bet would be to just take water with you each time you go out. that is what I do with my camelbak fill it each time I head out on a trip. this will take some weight out of the bag, but in this case it needs to be put somewhere else anyways. If you have any other question I might beable to help, either PM me or post on the thread I made for emergency kits and survial tips. (I am tring to get the next tip up there so all please be patient.lol.)
09-18-2007 05:12 PM
KA5IVR I believe it does not, if it is kept in the Dark. Which mine is.

I'm not a biologists, but isn't that how Water Cisterns and Water Towers work? Kept the water in the dark and the bacterial can not grow...

Good Point to look in to. I don't like the Plastic Bottles either because what they are made out of. I have some of the Nalgene bottles. They seem better, but take up too much room. They make a collapsible one, but I haven't tried one yet.
09-18-2007 11:14 AM
OdhinnsChick
Quote:
Originally Posted by JCS05Rubi View Post
One thing KA5IVR, once you crack the seal on bottle water, bacteria begins to grow. Lots of times, to a dangerous level in under 24hrs. You can get very sick doing it that way. No ones kit is perfect, please don't take it the wrong way, just an observation.
I was thinking the same thing. I just read that in warm to hot temps certain plastic bottles can leech toxins into the water. I know I've seen a few water bottles with replaceable filters in them. I would think that one of those and maybe some tabs would probably work best.
09-18-2007 11:02 AM
JCS05Rubi One thing KA5IVR, once you crack the seal on bottle water, bacteria begins to grow. Lots of times, to a dangerous level in under 24hrs. You can get very sick doing it that way. No ones kit is perfect, please don't take it the wrong way, just an observation.
09-18-2007 10:32 AM
Odhinn KA5IVR just outclassed most of our kits, I suspect. I know mine won't compete with it. Very nice, and well thought out kit.
09-17-2007 09:39 PM
KA5IVR Vehicle Survival Kit:
This Kit is intended for basic short term Survival, while waiting on help or rescue, in lieu of a Bug-Out type setup. Those type kits require a lot more items and space to carry them. I contoured this kit to meet my needs and activity, but your kit may vary some. The basics may be the same, but other items need to meet your environment and geographic location. For example, your need for shelter and water in the Desert Southwest are different from the Greater Northwest. Another example, the natural elements and wildlife dangers are different in Florida from what they are in Alaska. Seasonal changes may require changes in your kit too. Remember to replace batteries and rotate foods items when needed

My current Survival Kit is packed in a 12x8x9 Tool Bag with side pockets. Most items are stored in ziploc bags, grouped, and then stored in Eagle Creek travel gear zippered bags. This kit started out many years ago as a winter survival car kit housed in a coffee can, but updated and it expanded to serve other purposes. I normally keep this kit in my indoor aboveground tornado shelter, but I also use it while traveling and as part of my 72 hours RACES Go-Kit.

My First Aid kit is kept separate because I carry that at times without the survival kit. Like most of us do, I carry extra food and water in a cooler while traveling. This helps supplement what is included in the kit. I also carry weapons, rain gear, auto supplies, tools, safety, and recovery items. I include a sleeping bag and a wool blanket in the winter months and for mountain travel. The Survival Kit and this extra stuff, except the cooler, fits behind the rear seat of the Jeep in a medium sized (http://bigfootbag.com) Bigfoot Bag, strapped down with bungee cords. The Bigfoot Bag can also double for shelter and can provide shade. My vehicle is equipped with Ham Radio equipment, GPS, and I carry a cell phone. Below are some photos of my Kit and a list of most of the contents:











Food and Water:
· 3 Bottles of Water – sealed in a ziploc bag. Remove about 20% of the water from each bottle to allow for expansion, if freezing is possible. Supplemented by extra water in a cooler.
· Canned Soap – can to be used for candles or boiling water after contents are eaten
· Canned Tuna in spring water
· Can of Vienna Sausages
· Small Can of Bean Dip
· Several Snack Bars (Hi Energy types) – sealed in a ziploc bag
· Instant Oatmeal, Tea Bags, Bouillon Cubes, Sugar Packets, Salt & Pepper – sealed in a ziploc bag
· Water Purification Tablets

Heating and Cooking:
· Disposable Lighter
· Strike Anywhere Matches in Water Proof Container
· Strip Magnifier
· Candles
· Soap Can for Burning Candles – left over from above
· Sterno Canned Heat, 7oz
· Fire Starter
· 36” length of Aluminum Foil (folded small)
· Stainless Steel Camping Cup
· Camping style Fork/Knife/Spoon
· Combo Bottle & Can Opener/Cork Screw

Shelter and Utensils:
· 2 Space Blankets
· 3 Light Sticks – 12 hour each
· Mini Mag-Lite with LED Mod as well as extra batteries and bulb
· 50’ of Utility Cord
· Small Karabiner – to works with the cord
· 4 small plastic clamps – used to attach shelter edges to limbs or vehicle
· Pliers – use as a tool & pot lifter
· Buck 110 lock-blade Knife
· Small White Hand Towel
· TP & Moist Towelettes
· 2 Clear 55 Gal Plastic Trash Bags – for ground cover or to make Solar Still
· 2 Dark 40 Gal Plastic Trash Bags – for cover or rain poncho

Safety and Rescue:
· First Aid Kit – packed separate as noted
· Small Pencil & Paper
· Compass – helps to have a map too
· Whistle
· Signal Mirror
· Small Strobe Signal Light
· Red Bandanna
· Orange Safety Vest, mesh style – used to signal and to be seen by aircraft
· Gloves & Hat
· Sunscreen & Insert Repellent
09-17-2007 05:06 PM
hardy1531 Thanks for the advise on the vaccum packer. I will try and give that a shot. The med bag is my personal. I use it on calls with the Volunteer Fire Department. We don't run Medical calls, so we don't "have " to have it but I like having it b/c you never know how long it might before EMS shows up. Plus being a boyscout I go prepared. As far as communitcations, does anyone have a Sat phone? We have a couple at work, but we have not had to use them. Do you need a "plan" like a reg cell phone?
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