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Topic Review (Newest First)
08-22-2012 10:18 AM
1SAS
Thank you...

Dear Chris,

Thank you for serving our country for 24 years!! Thank you for your kind words. I wish you the best.

Take care,
08-22-2012 07:10 AM
warbird24
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1SAS View Post
At this conference, there was a Soviet SCUD Missile Launcher complete with missile. I am not sure if this was a privately owned vehicle or on loan from a military museum. It was painted in the same green that the Soviets painted all of their stuff in. To those of you who were "of age" during Desert Shield and Desert Storm, the SCUDs were newsworthy Soviet made equipment that was an important part in that war... not important as an accurate weapon, but important as a "weapon of propaganda" to instill fear in the surrounding populations outside of Iraq. They were said to carry chemical, biological and nuclear warheads.

I apologize for not having taking any photos of that vehicle. The lighting was very good in the arena, but my camera wasn't doing too well in there with such a big vehicle. The photos were too dark that you couldn't make it out.

Take care,

P.S. My friend Alan did notice something unusual about the SCUD missile launcher... on the tires were molded the ENGLISH words, "Made in the USSR".

Wow, didn't expect to see SCUD in any of these threads. I was called to Active Duty USAF back during that time period. The Airbase we were at was protected by a Patriot Missile Battery and did actively take out a few SCUD missiles that were in bound to our base.

Dang, that brings back some bad memories....

Thank you for posting what you have. It is a History lesson for most here. Some great period Photographs! Some of the Photographers took some great detail shots when they had the time. Looking at the sharpness and detail in some of those pictures....Just amazing.

I've been poking around looking for a later model Jeep from the 50's to restore as a SAC Flightline vehicle. I want to be different, but still have that military flavor to the restoration. I love the simplicity of the early Jeeps, the rawness and purposeful nature of the vehicle.

Again, Thank you for the History lesson Sir.

Chris,

Retired USAF First Sergeant, 24 years of proud service
08-21-2012 12:56 PM
1SAS
WWII Jeep ingenious engine lighting system...

The WWII jeep had its headlights mounted behind the grill. One of the reasons was this protected the light bulbs from damage. Brush tended to hit the grill and not the headlight.

What few jeepers today know is that these headlights were mounted on "hinged headlight assemblies" and could be pivoted to the rear, to shed light on the engine compartment at night. It was quite a simple and effective way to light up the engine compartment. Now remember, the WWII jeep used a six volt electrical system so it certainly wasn't the brightest light, but it was better than nothing AND BETTER THAN FLASHLIGHTS FOR MOST JOBS.

My friend Alan sent me these photos to show you guys the system and how it worked. I hope you like them.

This first photo is a close up of the headlight in the grill. The second photo is the "headlight assembly" being held down with a wing nut at the rear of the bracket. The third photo shows more detail of the wing nut. The fourth photo shows the headlights hinged backwards, pointing toward the engine compartment, or there abouts. The last photo shows another view of the headlights pointing to the engine compartment.

I have personally used this system to work on my WWII jeep at night and some others. The major drawback to this system is the weak light coming from the 6volt electrical system... but it was way better than nothing. It wasn't as powerful as a 150 watt "drop light" but it was pretty good. It was enough light to diagnose problems in the field and on the side of the road. I did both. Of course, one such mishap involved a "light show" which I was watching for some time before we turned the headlights around. The jeep owner I was helping didn't really maintain his vehicle well and all kinds of wires were "arcing". It was impressive! It was fun to watch, but once home, it took a while to fix. He had the original electrical system in his jeep and the insulation cracked all over the place. It was still fun to watch at night.

Take care,
07-31-2012 09:22 PM
Ruby Tuesday Very interesting thread.....thank you
07-01-2012 08:08 AM
1SAS
Scud Missle Launcher...

At this conference, there was a Soviet SCUD Missile Launcher complete with missile. I am not sure if this was a privately owned vehicle or on loan from a military museum. It was painted in the same green that the Soviets painted all of their stuff in. To those of you who were "of age" during Desert Shield and Desert Storm, the SCUDs were newsworthy Soviet made equipment that was an important part in that war... not important as an accurate weapon, but important as a "weapon of propaganda" to instill fear in the surrounding populations outside of Iraq. They were said to carry chemical, biological and nuclear warheads.

I apologize for not having taking any photos of that vehicle. The lighting was very good in the arena, but my camera wasn't doing too well in there with such a big vehicle. The photos were too dark that you couldn't make it out.

Take care,

P.S. My friend Alan did notice something unusual about the SCUD missile launcher... on the tires were molded the ENGLISH words, "Made in the USSR".
07-01-2012 07:56 AM
1SAS
WWII Weasel...

I know this vehicle wasn't a JEEP but it was at the show and it is very rare. This is the first time I have ever seen one in person. When I was a kid, I built a few Tamiya models of this vehicle but never actually saw one.

This is the WWII Weasel. It was an amphibious tracked vehicle. The military experimented with the idea of a "tracked jeep" but decided against it. This vehicle wasn't produced in large quantities, but I guess it "filled the bill" so they used this instead.

Take care,
07-01-2012 07:46 AM
1SAS
2012 Military Vehicle Preservation Association Conference

The MVPA Conference was in Huntsville, Alabama. It was in their "arena" and the conference was small compared to past years. The temperature was a whopping 106, so we were glad it wasn't in the parking lot outside. There were plenty of vendors on hand, so if you wanted anything for your military jeep, you could get it. The prices were quite reasonable, when you factored in shipping.

Anyway, here are some photos...
06-25-2012 06:57 AM
Mike Gardner Thank you very much. Maybe I'll make a thread here. I'm a member of so any willys/Jeep forums I forget where I have pics and where I should post them. My YouTube channel has some of the build. I'll get everything off disc and make a photo album. I had a online album but the web site closed.

Here is a thread on thecj2apage.com

7 Years of work.... A lifetime of fun! - The CJ2A Page Forums - Page 1

My YouTube name is mikeg576

Thanks again for the kind words.
06-24-2012 08:41 AM
1SAS Mike Gardner,

I wish you would post photos of your jeep build. I would love to see them. I would also like to see more current photos of your jeep in its present state... showing the interior, drivetrain, etc. You have a very nice jeep.

Take care,
06-23-2012 12:59 AM
Mike Gardner Great thread. I took 7 years to build my 1945 cj2a. I now use it as a daily driver and wheeler.

06-04-2012 02:32 PM
euroford this thread is awesome. i'd love to find a GPW to restore someday.
06-01-2012 08:11 PM
1SAS
Just a thought...

One of the things I truly loved about owning a WWII Jeep was it was "living history." It truly was. It was more than nostalgia. It was more than driving a curio. It was driving a piece of history. It was so fantastic driving an original jeep on the road or in the field. Sure, the current jeeps can go faster and carry more weight. Then can go over bigger obstacles, but there is a difference.

When I drove a WWII jeep, people turned their heads. They really looked. WWII veterans waved and at times, cried. That jeep brought back so many memories to the veterans AND their families. Their children would point and want us to stop... they just wanted to touch the jeep that their father talked so much about. There truly is something about those original jeeps.

Living history is bringing that jeep to a Veterans' Public Event and watching people swarm to the jeep just to see it. It has an American Iconic memory attached to it, more than anything else from WWII. The jeep is the symbol of what is good in America at a time America "saved the world" with its greatness!

I loved living history so much, almost 30 years ago, I began WWII reenacting. In this organization, men and women collect WWII uniforms, equipment and vehicles to put on "tacticals" and "public displays." These men and women "fight" with real weapons (that shoot "blanks") in the field. These battles are harmless but as close to fighting in WWII as you can get without being harmed. You experience what it was like in a "war game scenario" very similar to what our troops used today to prepare them for war. It can be very realistic, fun AND EYE OPENING! You start to realize how wrong Hollywood "has it" in many war movies. The hobby is more than collecting the gear, it is researching the period and "getting it right".

Many years ago, my father-in-law introduced me to a man who had converted his garage to a museum for the American Calvary. He had mannequines dressed in various US Calvary uniforms and equipment for different periods in their history. It was very nice and very elaborate. He had the mannequines in atmospheric controlled cases that really protected the original uniform and equipment. it was beautiful!

I commented on how nice it was and he commented on what he thought of "living history" and "WWII reenactment". He told me, "I really don't like it because you guys tear up the uniform by wearing it." Then I reminded him, "Doc, more people see my uniform and equipment in one event than will ever see your museum." You see, Doc, collected but no one saw his collection except on a personal invitation. When we did the many public events we supported, thousands (if not tens of thousands) of Americans saw our uniforms, equipment and vehicles. These people got to interact with us and ask us many questions about the uniform, gear and equipment AND VEHICLES. Each of us kind of became a little "museum curator" that you could interact with. It was a great service to the veterans and they kept inviting us back year after year. It really works well.

I have always loved jeeps. There is something special about them. I have always loved and respected out veterans, especially our WWII veterans. Driving that WWII jeep is living history.

Take care,
06-01-2012 01:20 PM
div4gold
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1SAS View Post
The following photos are of WWII Jeep "Convoys" in a forest. These guys dress up in WWII uniforms and take their vehicles out to go "camping." They use all WWII gear and have a great time.

The first photo contains five WWII jeeps, both Ford and Willys and on the very end, there is one CJ2A. You will note the two "tow bars" on two of the jeeps.

The second photo (in the first column) shows two of the jeeps hooked up by "tow bar." When these guys cross a river, they hook up their tow bars and they go at it "in line." They just plow through. Usually the lead jeeps gets the worst of it, while the last jeep gets the next worst of it. But they all manage to get through, in line and together. All kicking butt.

The third photo (in the second column) shows the jeeps on the side of the road. It was "lunch time"...

The last photo is cruising down the trail. These guys really enjoy these "outings" and the vehicles are so quiet. It is amazing how quiet these "Flat Head" four cylinders are!!! They are super quiet. If you ever hear a noisy one, it is "out of tune" or there is an exhaust problem. When they are going slow in the field, you can barely hear them.

Take care,
With the push/tow bars on some of those Jeeps you could make a choo-choo train and go just about anywhere. Pretty neat set up , I haven't seen those before.
06-01-2012 10:45 AM
Jsboening
Quote:
Originally Posted by 58-Willy

Yeah, I've managed to get all new brakes. They were coated in some anti rust stuff. My very front body mount that rests on wood on the frame just below the toe board rotted
Late respond, but I replaced my front rzeppa joints on both front axles. The box that the new ones came in was dated back to 45'. I honestly felt horrible just opening the box. The box was covered with a heavy wax and paper. Inside was another box with more wax and paper and the joints themselves were covered with the stuff. They really packaged them to last. When I got them all cleaned up they looks brand new.

This was the first time I also shed a tear opening a package. Lol
05-31-2012 08:16 PM
1SAS div4gold,

The next time I talk to my friend, I will ask him about the #19 set. Remember it was a British wireless set, not an American one.

Also, I was sent this photo from a jeeper in Germany. He sent a more intricate and detailed photo of the German Schwimwagen's water propulsion system. I thought you guys might like it. Remember this unit it "hinged up" and resting on the rear trunk/hood. When in use, it is "hinged down" and locked into the "PTO". Then it is "driven" off into the water. Its water speed was about 3-5mph. Not very fast but it worked.

Take care,
05-31-2012 02:05 PM
div4gold That's interesting , my first Jeep was a 1942 Ford Military. I was wondering about the '19' radio you said your friend had in your old Jeep. Was that a ANGRC 19 ?
05-31-2012 07:17 AM
1SAS
WWII photos of the unusual and modified jeep...

A buddy of mine sent me some more photos of WWII jeeps. These jeeps are different...

The first photo is of a "typical" armored jeep found at Bastogne (The Battle of the Bulge). It features frontal and side armored plate. This "plate" was just a little thicker than heavy sheet metal and would not stop the 7.92mm round the German MG42 fired (This was the German equivalent to the American 30 calibre round the Garand fired.) But this plate would stop any submachine gun round and it was better than nothing.

The second photo shows the rear of a modified jeep. This jeep has a storage rack mounted in the back to give the jeep more storage capacity. You will notice it is mounted high so the jeep can still go up high angled inclines. As I understand it, the Jeep's original carburetor was good for running at 45˚ in any direction. A pretty impressive feat for that day.

The third and fifth photos are from Bastogne again. Here we have a double mounted bazooka. Pretty impressive firepower and creativity. Of course, contrary to what hollywood tells us, bazookas couldn't penetrate the Tiger tanks, nor the King Tigers that the Germans were using at Bastogne. (Thank God those bad boys ran out of gas!) The bazooka could penetrate a German Panther tank from the rear, but it had difficulty penetrating the sides of the armor. It was truly designed to take out the smaller Panzer tanks and fortifications. FYI the Army originally didn't even want the weapon. They thought it was too bulky. The inventor than showed the Army brass (on a testing range with non-explosive warheads) that he could hit a moving tank all the time. The brass than had a change of heart and went with it. It is a shame the bazooka didn't go through any "upgrades" during the war that would have allowed our soldiers to take on the Tiger tanks and the King Tigers.

The fourth photo shows a loaded and packed jeep. You will notice how these guys "pack for safari"... they are "loaded for bear". These guys were recon troops and they lived out of their jeeps. I always find these photos interesting because they are very similar to how people pack their jeeps today when they go on long trips in the wilderness. We may be some 67 years later, but "jeepers" are still "jeepers" and they pack for the long haul, whatever the mission..

I hope you guys liked the new photos!


Take care,
01-14-2012 06:52 AM
58-Willy
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jsboening

I know what you mean. I'm restoring a 2a and it's killing me replacing a lot of the good old American iron with Taiwanese tin. The problem I have is all the used parts I find are in worse shape than the ones I already have.
Yeah, I've managed to get all new brakes. They were coated in some anti rust stuff. My very front body mount that rests on wood on the frame just below the toe board rotted
01-13-2012 05:08 AM
Jsboening
Quote:
Originally Posted by 58-Willy
I've got a 58 cj3b I want to restore to look like military jeep but parts are getting hard to find.
I know what you mean. I'm restoring a 2a and it's killing me replacing a lot of the good old American iron with Taiwanese tin. The problem I have is all the used parts I find are in worse shape than the ones I already have.
01-12-2012 06:48 PM
AmericaOverland Parts are getting hard to find? I guess you better get busy with a CNC machine and collect manufacturing tools.
01-12-2012 05:03 PM
58-Willy I've got a 58 cj3b I want to restore to look like military jeep but parts are getting hard to find.
01-12-2012 01:30 PM
Peepers
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1SAS View Post
These are the last photos from a German Jeeper who is doing a fabulous job of restoring his YJ. This is the VW Type 166 "Schwimmwagen". It is the amphibious version of the Kubelwagen. You will notice in the photos how smooth and rounded the body is compared to the Kubelwagen. You will also note the rail going around the entire body of the vehicle. This was to protect the body of the vehicle while in the water, at the water level. In many photos I have seen, many soldiers attached their kit to these rails.

In the second photo, you will see the oar attached to the side and the funny looking attachment attached to the rear. That attachment is the propeller assembly. It is hinged in the "upright" position to be out of the way while driving on land. This unit would be unlocked and put down where it engaged the "PTO". It was then locked in the "down" position. Now the propeller would turn with the drivetrain. It propelled the vehicle about 3-5 mph in the water.

Take care,
A Schwimmwagen!
01-12-2012 01:19 PM
Jsboening Very very cool. Looks HEAVY. Thanks for sharing.
01-12-2012 12:29 PM
kmanator Very neat photo's of the Vw's...I spied the US version of the amphibian Jeep at a local Military Vehicle collector show a while back...This is not my video though...kman

http://youtu.be/olNpFzRamkQ
01-12-2012 09:37 AM
1SAS
WWII German "Amphibious JEEP"...

These are the last photos from a German Jeeper who is doing a fabulous job of restoring his YJ. This is the VW Type 166 "Schwimmwagen". It is the amphibious version of the Kubelwagen. You will notice in the photos how smooth and rounded the body is compared to the Kubelwagen. You will also note the rail going around the entire body of the vehicle. This was to protect the body of the vehicle while in the water, at the water level. In many photos I have seen, many soldiers attached their kit to these rails.

In the second photo, you will see the oar attached to the side and the funny looking attachment attached to the rear. That attachment is the propeller assembly. It is hinged in the "upright" position to be out of the way while driving on land. This unit would be unlocked and put down where it engaged the "PTO". It was then locked in the "down" position. Now the propeller would turn with the drivetrain. It propelled the vehicle about 3-5 mph in the water.

Take care,
01-11-2012 05:51 PM
AmericaOverland Wait a minute... Didn't VW sell civilian versions of these for the US Market? I have a friend whose family had one in the 70s-80s.

Edit: I found it - http://www.carlustblog.com/2008/09/the-thing.html
01-11-2012 04:34 PM
1SAS
WWII German "JEEP"...

A fellow jeep restorer sent me these photos from Germany. He is doing a "frame up restoration" on his YJ and he came across my rebuild thread. He sent these to me this morning.

These photos are of the WWII German Volkswagen Type 42 "Kubelwagen". This was the German equivalent of the WWII Jeep. It was only two wheel drive but having the engine in the rear gave it a lot of added traction as compared to having the engine in the front. (However, it didn't have anywhere near the traction our American Willy's had!) It was an air cooled engine and you could see how that was a great benefit in desert fighting with little water. These vehicles were mostly destroyed after WWII so the few that survived are extremely rare and expensive.

As you can see, these photos show a pristine example of a restored Kubelwagen. It is immaculate and you can see the simplicity of its design and function. Now don't misunderstand me... the WWII Jeep "ruled" in WWII. I have seen many photos from WWII with the German Army driving as many American Jeeps as they could get their hands on... I often thought that was flattery for our Jeep and its ability. The fact is our jeep could go many places these Kubelwagens only hoped to go.

Take care,
12-24-2011 07:38 AM
1SAS
The 10th Mountain Division...

When I was at Ft. Benning, some of the soldiers I was with were part of and going to the 10th. They were great guys and really had great pride in being part of the 10th. I also trusted them to watch my back.

As far as the photos, I found them online.

Take care and have a great Christmas!!
12-23-2011 08:21 PM
Cj7otr Hooah! Great pics! I've worked with members of the 10th mountain, great group of guys. Did you find these pics online or do you have a connection to them?
12-23-2011 07:03 PM
1SAS
More WWII Jeep Photos #23...

These photos are "soldiers living out of their jeeps."

The first photo shows Japanese Americans of the 442nd taking a moment to eat. This unit was one of the most decorated of WWII. They fought hard for their new country and let everyone know, they weren't impressed with the enslavement of Asia by the Emperor of Japan. How? By kicking the Nazis butts in Europe. They were true warriors and earned their place in AMERICAN history. Notice we were fighting Japanese and these guys signed up to fight the Japanese for America. It was decided it would be a problem so they fought the Germans. They proved themselves "worthy" to those who didn't believe in them by fighting the Emperor's buddies in Europe.

The second photo shows soldiers of the 10th Mountain Division eating. The 10th was a hard, hitting unit that gave the Germans hell in WWII. Today the 10th Mountain Division is still keeping the proud tradition earned during WWII of being hard hitting warriors who destroy the enemy no matter where they hide. Be it a village, town or mountain high. Hooah 10th Mountain!!!

Take care, and have a great Christmas!!
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