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Topic Review (Newest First)
07-05-2013 01:32 PM
zmotorsports
Quote:
Originally Posted by misfit1981 View Post
I'm gonna jump in a year later...
'12 Rubi 2dr with BFG KM tires on stock 17x9 wheels. What is the lowest tire pressure I can get away with and not have to worry so much about the rubber flopping of the rim?
I'd be driving on sand dunes, and mild rock trails in the summer and unplowed roads and snow covered trails in the winter.
Hard to say what is the lowest you could run. A lot depends on how you drive, aggresive or conservative. Personally I air down to 15 psi for off-roading an it performs fantastic. I know of a couple of guys that will air down to around 6-8 psi but you will never see me airing that far down. One wrong bounce or slip sideways off a rock and the bead will pop right off the wheel.

Mike.
07-04-2013 04:58 PM
misfit1981 I'm gonna jump in a year later...
'12 Rubi 2dr with BFG KM tires on stock 17x9 wheels. What is the lowest tire pressure I can get away with and not have to worry so much about the rubber flopping of the rim?
I'd be driving on sand dunes, and mild rock trails in the summer and unplowed roads and snow covered trails in the winter.
04-03-2012 06:53 AM
daggo66
Quote:
Originally Posted by 12JKUR View Post
For some reason I thought you never change direction on any steel belted radial tire and didn't think any new car came w/anything but.
That was true in 1975. Back then the belts could shift. Tire manufacturing processes have improved a bit since then, yet the myth continues.
04-03-2012 06:51 AM
daggo66
Quote:
Originally Posted by RedBones View Post
OK, what psi for a 285/75-16 Duratrac???
The shop had 76psi in them they are 80psi Max.
I got 40psi in them now.
Thanks
Never go by the sidewall. It all depends on what vehicle the tires are on. Google "tire chalk test".
04-03-2012 05:56 AM
12JKUR For some reason I thought you never change direction on any steel belted radial tire and didn't think any new car came w/anything but.
04-02-2012 02:25 PM
RedBones OK, what psi for a 285/75-16 Duratrac???
The shop had 76psi in them they are 80psi Max.
I got 40psi in them now.
Thanks
04-02-2012 01:12 PM
3JKs1H1
Quote:
Originally Posted by C1ph3r View Post
Thanks Mike. No i dont have lockers or an LSD. Could a tire shop cut them down? Sorry for the thread jack.
Give that new Rubi tire to me and I'll give you a used one.
04-02-2012 12:52 PM
C1ph3r Thanks Mike. No i dont have lockers or an LSD. Could a tire shop cut them down? Sorry for the thread jack.
04-02-2012 10:42 AM
zmotorsports
Quote:
Originally Posted by C1ph3r View Post
great thread. found it when looking for tire pressure for stock Rubi tires. i just bought a set of Rubi wheels/tires used for my 08 JKU. the spare has never been used. the ones i put on the front look to have about 40% and the rear has about 50%+. Anyway i could start getting some use out of this spare. it has 100%. If i rotate them in this way what issues may i run in to since the spare has never been used?
You could possibly have some issues with it pulling to one side as the circumference is going to be different. If you are running LSDs in your axles I would not do it, otherwise it shouldn't hurt anything. Lockers can be effected but that would only come into play when wheeling.

When you wear them and get new make sure to do a 5-tire rotation from the get go and then no issues at all.

Mike.
04-02-2012 10:22 AM
C1ph3r great thread. found it when looking for tire pressure for stock Rubi tires. i just bought a set of Rubi wheels/tires used for my 08 JKU. the spare has never been used. the ones i put on the front look to have about 40% and the rear has about 50%+. Anyway i could start getting some use out of this spare. it has 100%. If i rotate them in this way what issues may i run in to since the spare has never been used?
03-31-2012 12:53 AM
jsalbre
Quote:
Originally Posted by OutlawJK View Post
prove it
I'd say they're wrong for any vehicle.

Say you follow that pattern and rotate the left front and rear back and forth, and the right front and rear and the spare rotate with each other.

If you rotate them every 5000 miles (or any other distance, as long as you do the same number of miles between each rotation), after 30000 miles of driving you have 2 tires with 30000 miles on them and 3 tires with 20000 mi on them; a difference of 10000 miles. That's going to cause a not-insignificant difference in tire diameter from one side to the other. This is going to cause the diffs to be constantly working, resulting in increased fluid temps and wear on the spider gears, especially if you do a lot of high-speed highway driving.

All of the tires (temp use spares excluded) on any vehicle should spend the same amount of time on the road.
03-30-2012 10:51 AM
OutlawJK
Quote:
Originally Posted by daggo66 View Post
Both shops are completely wrong for a Wrangler.

prove it
03-30-2012 08:18 AM
zmotorsports
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jurhip View Post
Just an FYI that doesn't apply to Jeeps - most cars now run directional tires, so the "forward cross" for front wheel drive vehicles is no longer recommended.

Directional tires can only be swapped front to back on the same side. This will be the recommendation for FWD, RWD or AWD/4WD with directional tires unless your car has larger rear tires (typical only on RWD or the high end "sporty" SUV's).
This is correct IF they are directional tires only. I definately wouldn't say "most cars" though. There are some but most are still coming from the OEM with non-directional tires until you get into higher end luxury and sport cars.

Quote:
Originally Posted by OutlawJK View Post
This is what I was told by two different tire shops
Rotate the spare in rotation on one side only
Left rear to left front left front to left rear
Right rear to right front, right front to spare
And spare to right rear. Every 6K miles
Both tires shops are incorrect. Non-directional tires should be rotated in a cross pattern front to rear depending on whether the vehicle is front wheel drive (FWD) or rear wheel drive (RWD). All wheel drive (AWD) and four wheel drive (4WD) vehicles fall under the category of RWD as far as pattern.

On a side note, in my opinion the fact that tires ARE rotated is more important to longevity and life of the tires than what pattern they are rotated in. It seems all tires if left too long in the front position on a vehicle will develop some form of irregular wear. The purpose of rotating the tire positions is to get those front tires onto the rear to "square" the surface back up and keep the irregular wear pattern from grabbing hold. Once an irregular pattern develops it is very difficult and takes much longer to correct than not letting it get too noticeable to begin with.

Personally I do a 5-tire rotation in the rear crossing pattern but if someone merely swapped front to rear it is better than not rotating at all.

Mike.
03-30-2012 07:28 AM
daggo66 Both shops are completely wrong for a Wrangler.
03-30-2012 07:15 AM
OutlawJK
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jurhip
Just an FYI that doesn't apply to Jeeps - most cars now run directional tires, so the "forward cross" for front wheel drive vehicles is no longer recommended.

Directional tires can only be swapped front to back on the same side. This will be the recommendation for FWD, RWD or AWD/4WD with directional tires unless your car has larger rear tires (typical only on RWD or the high end "sporty" SUV's).
This is what I was told by two different tire shops
Rotate the spare in rotation on one side only
Left rear to left front left front to left rear
Right rear to right front, right front to spare
And spare to right rear. Every 6K miles
03-30-2012 05:37 AM
krutj
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rooster76 View Post
Are you airing down in winter as a way to get better traction in crappy conditions. Or do they heat up and expand, and it is a matter of physics even with clear roads. I'm pretty new to all this stuff.
Yes, for better traction....
03-29-2012 10:45 PM
Rooster76
Thanks for the input

Quote:
Originally Posted by zmotorsports View Post
Again, size of tire and weight are going to be the determining factors. The OP should list what size and weight of rig and we can get him pretty close on pressures.

I also like to chalk my tires after setting pressure to get a final look at tire pattern.

Mike.
It's just a bone stock 2 Door JK Rubicon.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jurhip View Post
Just an FYI that doesn't apply to Jeeps - most cars now run directional tires, so the "forward cross" for front wheel drive vehicles is no longer recommended.

Directional tires can only be swapped front to back on the same side. This will be the recommendation for FWD, RWD or AWD/4WD with directional tires unless your car has larger rear tires (typical only on RWD or the high end "sporty" SUV's).
I actually just lifted the photo from another post. The Forward Cross "F" is not the way to go with these tires or any Jeep unless they start coming in FWD. (Maybe the 2WD Unlimited's are FWD? ) That Forward Cross picture just happens to be attached to the proper way in the second picture as noted. It probably was made by some tire company originally. The Reward Cross in the second picture "G" is the way you want to go with the stock Rubicon tires (as the thread ask about), or as you pointed out non-directional tires for 4WD. The reason stated for this configuration in that other post was that the rear right tire gets the most torque. So you want to use the freshest tire to that position.

Quote:
Originally Posted by krutj View Post
I've got 66k on my BFG KM's doing the 5 tire rotation every 5k (G). I run mine at 38psi in the summer and drop to 30psi (or less) in winter. I may get 85k or more from these mud tires doing the rotations, before I'm to the wear bars......
Anything over 40psi and you'll feel the harshness in the ride....and probably wear out the centers.
Are you airing down in winter as a way to get better traction in crappy conditions. Or do they heat up and expand, and it is a matter of physics even with clear roads. I'm pretty new to all this stuff.
03-29-2012 07:54 PM
Jurhip Just an FYI that doesn't apply to Jeeps - most cars now run directional tires, so the "forward cross" for front wheel drive vehicles is no longer recommended.

Directional tires can only be swapped front to back on the same side. This will be the recommendation for FWD, RWD or AWD/4WD with directional tires unless your car has larger rear tires (typical only on RWD or the high end "sporty" SUV's).
03-29-2012 06:20 PM
daggo66
Quote:
Originally Posted by zmotorsports View Post
Again, size of tire and weight are going to be the determining factors. The OP should list what size and weight of rig and we can get him pretty close on pressures.
OR, since he has a stock rig with stock tires, just look at the door sticker. Otherwise you are absolutely correct.
03-29-2012 05:22 PM
strider_mt2k
Quote:
Originally Posted by daggo66 View Post
Mine doesn't have that. It does have this, however:

Tires and the spare tire should be replaced after six
years, regardless of the remaining tread. Failure to
follow this warning can result in sudden tire failure.
You could lose control and have an accident resulting
in serious injury or death.
For a bad guy you are helpful and informative!

Kudos to you, sir.
03-29-2012 05:20 PM
kjeeper10
Quote:
Originally Posted by zmotorsports
"G" in the above diagram is the correct tire rotation for a 5-tire rotation.

The spare goes to Right Rear.
Left Front goes to Spare.
Right Front goes to Left Rear.
Left Rear goes straight forward to Left Front
Right Rear goes straight forward to Right Front.

Pressure depends on weight of the vehicle and tire size. For my 35" BFG KM2 tires I run them @ 28 psi on the street and air down to 15-16 psi off-road.

I rotate at every 5k mile LOF service.

Mike.
28 is where I have mine now. Its perfect!!
03-29-2012 04:54 PM
zmotorsports Again, size of tire and weight are going to be the determining factors. The OP should list what size and weight of rig and we can get him pretty close on pressures.

I also like to chalk my tires after setting pressure to get a final look at tire pattern.

Mike.
03-29-2012 03:59 PM
krutj I've got 66k on my BFG KM's doing the 5 tire rotation every 5k (G). I run mine at 38psi in the summer and drop to 30psi (or less) in winter. I may get 85k or more from these mud tires doing the rotations, before I'm to the wear bars......
Anything over 40psi and you'll feel the harshness in the ride....and probably wear out the centers.
03-29-2012 03:16 PM
zmotorsports "G" in the above diagram is the correct tire rotation for a 5-tire rotation.

The spare goes to Right Rear.
Left Front goes to Spare.
Right Front goes to Left Rear.
Left Rear goes straight forward to Left Front
Right Rear goes straight forward to Right Front.


Pressure depends on weight of the vehicle and tire size. For my 35" BFG KM2 tires I run them @ 28 psi on the street and air down to 15-16 psi off-road.

I rotate at every 5k mile LOF service.

Mike.
03-29-2012 03:10 PM
Rooster76
Thanks Daggo66 - Question Solved

Thanks for the quick response man, I totally respect your opinion
03-29-2012 10:27 AM
Wrong Way Hal What daggo66 says ....

The manufacturer of all of our vehicles don't spend millions in research and engineering just to randomly pick a PSI for tires and weight for GVWR.
03-29-2012 10:25 AM
daggo66
Quote:
Originally Posted by snikt View Post
I saw this in the owners manual though, but it seems like total BS to me --

Full Size Spare – If Equipped
The full size spare is for temporary emergency use only.
This tire may look like the original equipped tire on the
front or rear axle of your vehicle, but it is not.
Mine doesn't have that. It does have this, however:

Tires and the spare tire should be replaced after six
years, regardless of the remaining tread. Failure to
follow this warning can result in sudden tire failure.
You could lose control and have an accident resulting
in serious injury or death.
03-29-2012 10:12 AM
WatchThis! Well shoot in that case I guess Iv goten lucky becouse my spair probly has about 20k on it
03-29-2012 10:08 AM
snikt I saw this in the owners manual though, but it seems like total BS to me --

Full Size Spare – If Equipped
The full size spare is for temporary emergency use only.
This tire may look like the original equipped tire on the
front or rear axle of your vehicle, but it is not.
03-29-2012 09:27 AM
daggo66
Quote:
Originally Posted by snikt View Post
I've never seen a diagram that rotated the spare in, is that correct?
Really? Yes, that is correct. It should be right on the paperwork you received for your tire warranty. You should always rotate the spare in when you have a full size spare. You will gain 20% more tread life. Anyone planning on keeping the spare should remember that tires have a shelf life as well as a tread life. Use it or lose it.
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