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Topic Review (Newest First)
08-27-2013 09:11 AM
Ivoryring Here is a concrete question:

How do I get my photographs of a Jeep + rocks + dirt + close trees to get the same feel as the space did when I was in it?

I'm thinking I need to move toward telephoto end of things, because wide angles that make it practical to get more of the field of view into the frame cause enough distortion that the "road/trail" doesn't look at all like it felt either driving or walking through.
08-16-2013 10:48 AM
mmmanimalfat Attachment 286534 Attachment 286535

Attachment 286536 Attachment 286537 Attachment 286538 Attachment 286539

I have a new subject!
I am very much a beginner.
All shots were taken with a canon t3 and 50mm 1.8 with no real photo editing. ( I don't have any program besides windows)
I have tons more of the dog lol. But much more to come of the little one. Any and all criticism is more than welcome!
07-24-2012 09:57 AM
karencz I am a complete hobbyist, doing lots of kids sports photos and custom prints (love Photoshop!!) and trying to expand beyond that. Shooting with my Nikon and having lots of fun experimenting!











I like to try to look at things from different angles...and just have fun with it! www.kcsactionphotos.com
07-24-2012 09:46 AM
Six
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geoscene View Post
Read a book or take an intro course at a community college for the basics. Then look at lots of pictures and see if you can tell how they were taken AND why you liked them. Try to copy them. It's a great way to accelerate the learning curve. A lot of people post their exif data for a photograph on Flickr.
Understanding Exposure gets a ton of reveiws. Light, Science and Magic is a great book for teaching lighting theory. It gives you more of "this is why light works" rather than, "here's a lighting setup to copy and use."

Strobist is a great site to learn lighting off of and there's regional Strobist groups throughout the world. There was a pretty good one for the DC/Baltimore/NoVa region which also included events in Philly, WV, and MD. We even had people from NY drive down to participate but it's mostly dormant right now.

Workshops are a great place to learn as well. Even paid workshops depending on who the instructor is, what they're teaching, and what you want to learn. Don Giannatti of Lighting Essentials does a pretty amazing workshop and provides models and shooting locations.

Obligatory photo in the photo thread:
07-24-2012 09:07 AM
Irongrave there is little replacement for time behind the lens. I am by no means a great photographer but can constantly take good photos when ever I pick up the camera.

Shooting with a
Canon 5D MK1
Canon 17-40 L4
Canon 28-105 L4
Tamron 70-200 2.8
07-24-2012 08:20 AM
Geoscene Read a book or take an intro course at a community college for the basics. Then look at lots of pictures and see if you can tell how they were taken AND why you liked them. Try to copy them. It's a great way to accelerate the learning curve. A lot of people post their exif data for a photograph on Flickr.
07-22-2012 12:12 PM
JKU2012PA Great pics! Thanks for sharing.
07-22-2012 12:08 PM
chef21 Great pic TJ Girl.
07-18-2012 07:41 PM
TJ Girl So glad to see other photogs here! Rarely do I leave home without a Canon or two.....or my Wrangler....
Attachment 142176
07-15-2012 09:23 AM
chef21
Quote:
Originally Posted by shearpamela View Post
I have a Canon 40D
Canon 50mm 1:1.4
Canon 28-105mm USM
Sigma 17-35mm
Sigma 70-300mm
Sigma 105mm Macro
580 EXll Speedlite

Chef21 - WOW, great photography!

thanks for the comment.
07-11-2012 12:13 PM
LoneHowler Always have a camera handy even if its just your phone, and don't be afraid to stick you head in unusual places you may not know what may stare back at you


IMG_1515 by LoneHowler, on Flickr


251879_10151900687780603_1220207699_n by LoneHowler, on Flickr

the last one is a fireworks display taken with my iphone

07-11-2012 11:31 AM
lindel It also helps to be ready and willing to take advantage of opportunities as they arise. One of my favorite pictures I took was a matter of happenstance.



As I walked by the entrance of this particular exhibit, this little girl turned around and struck a pose.
07-11-2012 10:54 AM
Six Learn how to light, it'll be the best thing you've ever done for your photography.

07-05-2012 05:58 PM
shearpamela I have a Canon 40D
Canon 50mm 1:1.4
Canon 28-105mm USM
Sigma 17-35mm
Sigma 70-300mm
Sigma 105mm Macro
580 EXll Speedlite

Chef21 - WOW, great photography!
07-03-2012 04:34 PM
chef21 I am using the 5D mkii
24-105 L
70-200 2.8 IS L
50 1.8
17-40 L
this is my web site for anyone interested

Gary hillier photography | Wix.com
03-11-2012 11:58 AM
Coffeeman
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcbear View Post
there is a story passed around photographers...

A photographer has a show and as the show is ending a local chef comes up to him and complements him on the photography saying "you must have a very good camera to take such wonderful photographs". The photog smiled and said thank you.

Later the photographer and some friends were at the chef's restaurant when the chef came over and ask how everything was. The photographer said "it was great, you must have a very good stove".
:d
03-10-2012 11:00 PM
McBear
Quote:
Originally Posted by pprice72 View Post
As far as equipment goes, I am a Canon man so most of my knowledge is geared to them as far as equipment goes.
I can tell you this, your equipment is just a tool and will not give you the photo you are after if you do not understand the basics of photography
There is a story passed around photographers...

A photographer has a show and as the show is ending a local chef comes up to him and complements him on the photography saying "You must have a very good camera to take such wonderful photographs". The photog smiled and said thank you.

Later the photographer and some friends were at the chef's restaurant when the chef came over and ask how everything was. The photographer said "It was great, you must have a very good stove".
03-10-2012 12:49 AM
pprice72 I am also very into photography and would help anyone that needs it. As far as equipment goes, I am a Canon man so most of my knowledge is geared to them as far as equipment goes.
I can tell you this, your equipment is just a tool and will not give you the photo you are after if you do not understand the basics of photography. Lighting is EVERYTHING...Learn it, understand it, know it better than you know your own name!
It does not matter if you go out and buy a 1D MKIV with a 400 2.8IS if you dont know how to use it. I see people get hung up on buying this or that and then not knowing how to use it when they could have bought a point and shoot and got the same photo
I dont agree with Photoshop not being a great tool for photography. I agree that getting as much as you can right when you take the photo is the way to go, but I think PS is a very valuable tool and if you know it well, it will make your workflow much better and more easy.
03-07-2012 05:48 PM
McBear I have been shooting either professionally or as an advanced hobby since 1973. I started with Olympus OM1 and now shoot with Olympus E3 and E30.

I agree with most of what has been said above. Shoot as much as you can, different subjects, different modes. But, and this is important, don't go into paparazzi mode, where you just shoot a bunch of the same shot.

I took classes back in the early 70s from Ansel Adams (and his staff) [landscape] and Robin Perry [advertising]. Both taught me to use a tripod on most everything I shoot. That way your brain doesn't rush any shot. You have to think about every aspect of every shot. So, even today I haul around a 12 pound Bogen 3040 Tripod for my digital work and have the ISO [asa for us old farts] set at 100. I would set it at 25 [old Kodachrome ASA] if my camera would do it.

As for Photoshop...NO. Not while learning. You learn by fully framing and saturating the photo by the mechanics of the camera and lens. Only time you might use Photoshop is to take out crap that you could not avoid in the shot. But if you had camera on tripod and walked around enough, most likely you would avoid crap in the shot.

Only tool I play with on the computer is Lightroom. It is nothing more than the digital version of standing on a concrete floor in the previous darkroom huffing chemicals and burning up metric dollars worth of color paper looking for the correct saturation and contrast.

Shoot pics and ask questions and there are more than enough folks on this thread that look like they have the experience to help. But most of all have fun.

03-06-2012 11:27 AM
Coffeeman Subscribed. Does anyone else smell a book? ...The Art of Photographing Your Jeep in its Natural Environment" I would read that. 00' TJ and Nikon D40x ready to contribute.
02-19-2012 12:50 PM
fan of fanboys
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paulie
They're probably closer to $650. Other manufacturers, like Olympus' PEN series, are probably closer to that range.
Well if that's the case, other than size, wouldn't it make sense in my case to buy the Nikon D3000/3100? The size isn't huge problem for me and if I can get a higher quality picture?
02-19-2012 12:38 PM
Paulie They're probably closer to $650. Other manufacturers, like Olympus' PEN series, are probably closer to that range.
02-19-2012 11:36 AM
fan of fanboys
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paulie

Either the D3000 or D3100 would be good but the D3100 is newer with more mexapixels so I'd learn toward that. If you go the DSLR route, for what you plan to shoot I'd suggest getting a single zoom lens like an 18-200mm or similar lens that covers as much range as possible. If you get a kit like an 18-55/55-200 you'll probably find you're constantly changing lenses.

Unless you're really are set on getting a DSLR style camera you may even want to consider a mirrorless camera like Nikon's new 1 series. I have a Panasonic GF1 and it takes near DSLR quality photos but is a lot smaller and easier to pack away for vacations.
Thanks for the response.

I'm open to the mirror less option I guess. Honestly never heard of it. But will certainly look into it. Is it about the same $400-500 price range?
02-19-2012 11:06 AM
Paulie
Quote:
Originally Posted by fan of fanboys View Post
Just to get you guys opinion: I'm looking at getting a Nikon D3000 or D3100. When film was readily available I shot a Nikon N65. I'm not fancy nor will I ever be. Not even a hobby. Just pictures of vacations, family events, etc. I'll prolly keep it mostly auto. Is that a good camera for my needs? It fits my price range.
Either the D3000 or D3100 would be good but the D3100 is newer with more mexapixels so I'd learn toward that. If you go the DSLR route, for what you plan to shoot I'd suggest getting a single zoom lens like an 18-200mm or similar lens that covers as much range as possible. If you get a kit like an 18-55/55-200 you'll probably find you're constantly changing lenses.

Unless you're really are set on getting a DSLR style camera you may even want to consider a mirrorless camera like Nikon's new 1 series. I have a Panasonic GF1 and it takes near DSLR quality photos but is a lot smaller and easier to pack away for vacations.
02-19-2012 10:18 AM
Gliderjohn Outdoor lighting on a sunny day -

best time to shoot is before 10 a.m. and after 2 p.m.

The lighting and shadows are more dramatic at these times. The color of the light will vary and can produce very interesting results.

Shooting between 10 and 2 - landscapes can look flat and portraits can have bad shadows in your subject's faces.

The sun does NOT have to be behind you all the time. Try side lighting and back lighting. Results can be stunning!

Look at your subject from different angles. Most people take pictures only at eye level. Try shooting from a lower or higher angle.

Take lots and lots of pics. You may wind up discarding many or most of the shots you take, but there's more chances of getting that one shot that you'll love.

Experiment. Experiment. Experiment. Get creative. Have fun!
02-19-2012 09:53 AM
fan of fanboys Just to get you guys opinion: I'm looking at getting a Nikon D3000 or D3100. When film was readily available I shot a Nikon N65. I'm not fancy nor will I ever be. Not even a hobby. Just pictures of vacations, family events, etc. I'll prolly keep it mostly auto. Is that a good camera for my needs? It fits my price range.
02-19-2012 09:03 AM
Paulie ^ We have mostly the same stuff. Plus all the accessories.

Canon 5D mark ii
Canon 24-105 f/4L
Canon 70-200 f/2.8L IS II
Canon 85 f/1.8
Canon 50 f/1.4
Canon 17-40 f/4L

I've been using Alien Bees strobes and just picked up some Elinchroms.
02-19-2012 07:59 AM
jspeer1130 Nice to know that there are other keepers out here who love photography too!

Canon 5D mark ii
Canon 24-105 f4L
Canon 70-200 f2.8L
Canon 85 f1.8
Canon 70-300 (cheaper tele)
Canon rebel 1000D (currently has error 99 but I'm able to make it work well enough as a backup camera)
200 GB of compact flash and SD cards for use in both cameras

For studio lighting I'm currently using a set from britek with 4 lamps 2 umbrellas 2 soft boxes and a boom stand

Did I mention that I will take photos for food?
02-19-2012 07:11 AM
Gate53 The nice thing about owning a Jeep is you won't have a huge amount of money left to squander on photography items so choose wisely.
02-19-2012 06:59 AM
lindel
Quote:
Originally Posted by denisbaldwin View Post
Paulie - That's exactly what happened to me. Thankfully, I started in film with Canon cameras like 15 years ago so I had a lot of EF mount lenses that I could make work on the new digital bodies. I've since phased out all of my film stuff (and old lenses) but not before spending about 5 times what my Jeep has cost me over the years.

Definitely not a cheap hobby, but neither are my other hobbies (Jeeps, guns, working on my house, etc.)

That's in large part the beauty of Pentax. The lenses I bought for my ME, I can still use on my K-7. And they are forward compatible as well. Makes collecting lenses not quite as expensive when you buy a new body.
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