Jeep Wrangler Forum - Reply to Topic
Jeep Wrangler Forum

Go Back   Jeep Wrangler Forum > General Discussion Forums > Off-Topic > completely useless facts

Join Wrangler Forum Today


Thread: completely useless facts Reply to Thread
Title:
  
Message:
Post Icons
You may choose an icon for your message from the following list:
 

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Jeep Wrangler Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Additional Options
Miscellaneous Options

Topic Review (Newest First)
03-04-2014 03:09 PM
BlueRidgeYJ
Quote:
Originally Posted by krisbman View Post

Not bad, not bad. You just lurking or hanging around for a while???
Already gone.

Be good, bro. See ya 'round.
03-04-2014 02:33 PM
krisbman
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlueRidgeYJ View Post
Just living the dream... and patiently waiting for hiking season to show up. How goes on the other coast, dude?
Not bad, not bad. You just lurking or hanging around for a while???
03-04-2014 12:43 PM
BlueRidgeYJ
Quote:
Originally Posted by krisbman View Post

Clay, wassup my man!!!
Just living the dream... and patiently waiting for hiking season to show up.

How goes on the other coast, dude?
03-04-2014 11:03 AM
krisbman
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlueRidgeYJ View Post
There is 43,650 sq ft in an acre. This can be easily remembered as '7-11'. The larger number goes first and they are both sequential... 4+3 & 6+5+0 = 7 & 11. The above is an example of a mnemonic device. The word mnemonic is ancient Greek in origin, coming from mneme, the word for remembrance or memory. Also taken from mneme is Mnemosyne, the Greek Goddess of memory. Another Greek Goddess is Demeter, the Goddess of fertility, agriculture, nature, and seasons. Her Roman counterpart is Ceres, from whom the largest asteroid in the asteroid belt is named. It is roughly 1/3 of all the material in the asteroid belt, and has enough mass to form a round surface by gravity - earning it title as a dwarf planet. Speaking of 1/3... 1/3 of Earth is dry land, but the rest can be split as well. Somewhere between 35 and 50% of Earths surface is the abyssal plains - flat, smooth plains - running thousands of miles on the ocean floor, typically around 3000-6000M in depth. We know little about the plains, as they remain one of the least explored places on Earth, though we do know vast biodiversity exists there. Mt Everest, Earths tallest mountain, is 8850M for reference. Mt Mitchell is the tallest mountain in the Appalachian Range and Eastern US. It stands at 6,684ft, or ~2037M. It stands in NC (Burnsville), and would be considerably underwater anywhere on the abyssal plains. Appalachia is one of the first European named areas in America - the fourth place named. It was a Spanish explorer in the 1500s that first named us Appalachia, after the Apalachen (or more likely the Apalachee {Tallahassee area tribe}, from the Apalachee word 'abalachi' {' other side of the river'} or Muskogean word 'apalwahči' {'dwelling on the other side'}). His name was Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca, and he was also part of the Narváez Expedition. Many people, including Edgar Allan Poe, wanted the US named Appalachia. He opined... "It is a thousand pities that the puny witticisms of a few professional objectors should have the power to prevent, even for a year, the adoption of a name for our country. At present we have, clearly, none. There should be no hesitation about "Appalachia." In the first place, it is distinctive. "America" is not, and can never be made so. We may legislate as much as we please, and assume for our country whatever name we think right — but to use it will be no name, to any purpose for which a name is needed, unless we can take it away from the regions which employ it at present. South America is "America," and will insist upon remaining so." Poe, 1846 Panfilo de Narváez was a Spanish conquistador, official, and explorer. He was one of the first Jamacian settlers, and served in the conquest of Cuba. In 1520 he was charged with removing the treasonous Hernán Cortés as ruler of Mexico, gaining the command mainly due to his conduct during the Cuban campaign. He took 900 men and a fleet, but was quickly defeated and imprisoned. A later demand from Spain to Cortés gained his release back to Cuba. He later returned to Spain and on June 17 1527 embarked on a new voyage to counquor Florida and lands western, taking 600 soldiers, colonists, and sailors on five ships (The Narváez Expedition). In present day Santo Domingo, 140 crew deserted. In Cuba, a hurricane sank 2 ships killing 50 more crew and some livestock. They stayed in Cuba until spring 1528, then sailed with 5 ships (2 replacements) and 400 crew to the Tampa Bay area. Narváez began an overland campaign in May with about 300 men, making slow progress through the dense brush and constantly conflicting with local tribes. By the end of July they had made it to present day St Marks (near Tallahassee), some 230 miles, to what is now the Apalachee Bay. The original ships and 100 men never showed up to provide support, so the remaining crew, about 245 men, built 5 new ships and sailed west in September with hopes of reaching Mexico. The Expedition continued along the Gulf Coast, passing the mighty Mississippi River Delta, losing ships one by one. In early November, Narváez' ship was suddenly blown out to sea. By the time the group reached Galvaston Tx, they numbered only 80 and had lost their leader. They abandoned sea travel and decided to again set out on foot. In 1536, some 8 years later, Álvar Nuńēz Cabeza de Vaca, Alonso del Castillo Maldonado, Andrés Dorantes de Carranza, and de Carranzas enslaved Moor, Estevanico, walked into (present day) Mexico City, the only 4 men, of 600, to survive the expedition. And such was born the Appalachian name - through the recounting of Señor Cabeza de Vaca. Some 5 years later, around 1540, Hernando DeSoto himself took the name away from the general region and applied it specifically to the mountains that still hold the name today. Not useless - It is pronounced similar to "apple-at-cha", not "apple-a-sha" (no long A and 'ch' consonant blend instead of 'sh'). Cheers, and happy wheeling.

Clay, wassup my man!!!
03-04-2014 10:17 AM
BlueRidgeYJ There is 43,650 sq ft in an acre. This can be easily remembered as '7-11'. The larger number goes first and they are both sequential... 4+3 & 6+5+0 = 7 & 11.

The above is an example of a mnemonic device. The word mnemonic is ancient Greek in origin, coming from mneme, the word for remembrance or memory. Also taken from mneme is Mnemosyne, the Greek Goddess of memory.

Another Greek Goddess is Demeter, the Goddess of fertility, agriculture, nature, and seasons. Her Roman counterpart is Ceres, from whom the largest asteroid in the asteroid belt is named. It is roughly 1/3 of all the material in the asteroid belt, and has enough mass to form a round surface by gravity - earning it title as a dwarf planet.

Speaking of 1/3... 1/3 of Earth is dry land, but the rest can be split as well. Somewhere between 35 and 50% of Earths surface is the abyssal plains - flat, smooth plains - running thousands of miles on the ocean floor, typically around 3000-6000M in depth. We know little about the plains, as they remain one of the least explored places on Earth, though we do know vast biodiversity exists there. Mt Everest, Earths tallest mountain, is 8850M for reference. Mt Mitchell is the tallest mountain in the Appalachian Range and Eastern US. It stands at 6,684ft, or ~2037M. It stands in NC (Burnsville), and would be considerably underwater anywhere on the abyssal plains.

Appalachia is one of the first European named areas in America - the fourth place named. It was a Spanish explorer in the 1500s that first named us Appalachia, after the Apalachen (or more likely the Apalachee {Tallahassee area tribe}, from the Apalachee word 'abalachi' {' other side of the river'} or Muskogean word 'apalwahči' {'dwelling on the other side'}). His name was Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca, and he was also part of the Narváez Expedition. Many people, including Edgar Allan Poe, wanted the US named Appalachia. He opined...
"It is a thousand pities that the puny witticisms of a few professional objectors should have the power to prevent, even for a year, the adoption of a name for our country. At present we have, clearly, none. There should be no hesitation about "Appalachia." In the first place, it is distinctive. "America" is not, and can never be made so. We may legislate as much as we please, and assume for our country whatever name we think right — but to use it will be no name, to any purpose for which a name is needed, unless we can take it away from the regions which employ it at present. South America is "America," and will insist upon remaining so." Poe, 1846

Panfilo de Narváez was a Spanish conquistador, official, and explorer. He was one of the first Jamacian settlers, and served in the conquest of Cuba. In 1520 he was charged with removing the treasonous Hernán Cortés as ruler of Mexico, gaining the command mainly due to his conduct during the Cuban campaign. He took 900 men and a fleet, but was quickly defeated and imprisoned. A later demand from Spain to Cortés gained his release back to Cuba. He later returned to Spain and on June 17 1527 embarked on a new voyage to counquor Florida and lands western, taking 600 soldiers, colonists, and sailors on five ships (The Narváez Expedition). In present day Santo Domingo, 140 crew deserted. In Cuba, a hurricane sank 2 ships killing 50 more crew and some livestock. They stayed in Cuba until spring 1528, then sailed with 5 ships (2 replacements) and 400 crew to the Tampa Bay area. Narváez began an overland campaign in May with about 300 men, making slow progress through the dense brush and constantly conflicting with local tribes. By the end of July they had made it to present day St Marks (near Tallahassee), some 230 miles, to what is now the Apalachee Bay. The original ships and 100 men never showed up to provide support, so the remaining crew, about 245 men, built 5 new ships and sailed west in September with hopes of reaching Mexico. The Expedition continued along the Gulf Coast, passing the mighty Mississippi River Delta, losing ships one by one. In early November, Narváez' ship was suddenly blown out to sea. By the time the group reached Galvaston Tx, they numbered only 80 and had lost their leader. They abandoned sea travel and decided to again set out on foot. In 1536, some 8 years later, Álvar Nuńēz Cabeza de Vaca, Alonso del Castillo Maldonado, Andrés Dorantes de Carranza, and de Carranzas enslaved Moor, Estevanico, walked into (present day) Mexico City, the only 4 men, of 600, to survive the expedition. And such was born the Appalachian name - through the recounting of Señor Cabeza de Vaca.

Some 5 years later, around 1540, Hernando DeSoto himself took the name away from the general region and applied it specifically to the mountains that still hold the name today.

Not useless - It is pronounced similar to "apple-at-cha", not "apple-a-sha" (no long A and 'ch' consonant blend instead of 'sh').

Cheers, and happy wheeling.
03-02-2014 08:34 PM
chucky cheese Readers Digest was originally published as an edible magazine. Originally it was called Readers Digestive Tract. It was made to gives seniors more fiber.
03-02-2014 07:24 AM
Frankie IV_Play Yes they are haha
03-02-2014 06:11 AM
Wesboy All Gondolas in Venice are black.
02-07-2014 09:00 PM
jasonegla In Ecuador, and other places along the equator, the sun comes up at 6:30 AM and sets at 6:30 PC every day, 365 days a year.
02-05-2014 04:42 PM
Kthulhu
Quote:
Originally Posted by SeniorJeeper View Post
Wow Kthulhu, so your the other conservative in the Bay State!
The other? I thought I was the "only"!
02-04-2014 05:51 PM
SeniorJeeper Wow Kthulhu, so your the other conservative in the Bay State!
02-04-2014 05:31 PM
Kthulhu The United States of America was founded as a constitutional republic, not a democracy. The founders were opposed to pure democracy, referring to it as a "mobocracy" ...they were right.
02-04-2014 05:22 PM
Kthulhu
Quote:
Originally Posted by sparky View Post
All 50 states are listed across the top of the Lincoln Memorial on the back of the $5 bill.
Not to be a know it all BUT: when the Lincoln Memorial was built there were only 48 states in the Union. There are 26 states listed at the top of the Lincoln Memorial on the back of the $5 bill. Those are the 26 that can actually be seen on the front of the memorial because the memorial is a three dimensional structure with the 48 states listed around its entirety.
01-28-2014 04:04 PM
Old Dogger This evenings State of the Union Address.........
01-28-2014 12:26 PM
RoadGlide
Quote:
Originally Posted by _3m View Post
I don't know of a drilling fluid that would be able to keep up with those temps, evap would occur faster than it could reach the bottom of the hole. Impressive none the less
sounds like they were refrigerating the drilling mud, and the other wild thing i read is that the mud was used to drive the the drilling head...vs. turning the whole shaft...

it is interesting reading!
01-28-2014 12:20 PM
sparky Maine is the only state whose name is just one syllable.
01-28-2014 12:19 PM
sparky There are 118 ridges around the edge of a Roosevelt dime, 119 ridges around the edge of a quarter, and 150 ridges around the edge of a Kennedy half dollar.

All 50 states are listed across the top of the Lincoln Memorial on the back of the $5 bill.
01-21-2014 12:12 AM
goin camping The theme song for the TV show Dragnet is. "Danger Ahead."
01-13-2014 06:22 PM
NorthwoodsJeeper "Mingalaba" means hello in burmese
01-13-2014 02:15 PM
sparky The first testicular guard, the "Cup," was used in Hockey in 1874 and the first helmet was used in 1974. That means it only took 100 years for men to realize that their brain is also important.
01-11-2014 09:48 PM
_3m
Quote:
Originally Posted by RoadGlide View Post
The Kola Superdeep Borehole in the Pechengsky District, Kola Peninsula, Russia, the result of a Soviet scientific drilling project between 1970 and 2005. The deepest borehole, named SG-3, reached in 1989 is 40,230 ft (12,262 metres) deep...thinkin that's about high mileage for an H2... The drilling was stopped in 1992 due to higher-than-expected temperatures (180 °C/356 °F instead of 100 °C/212 °F). The project was closed in 2005 because of lack of funding. All of the equipment was scrapped and the site is abandoned since 2008. Yup...that's the hole with the cap on it...8 miles deep under that cap...guess it's too small to shove Hummers into uh? There are all kinds of internet hoaxes out there about microphones that recorded screams from millions of voices...
I don't know of a drilling fluid that would be able to keep up with those temps, evap would occur faster than it could reach the bottom of the hole. Impressive none the less
01-11-2014 04:29 PM
RoadGlide The Kola Superdeep Borehole in the Pechengsky District, Kola Peninsula, Russia, the result of a Soviet scientific drilling project between 1970 and 2005. The deepest borehole, named SG-3, reached in 1989 is 40,230 ft (12,262 metres) deep...thinkin that's about high mileage for an H2...





The drilling was stopped in 1992 due to higher-than-expected temperatures (180 °C/356 °F instead of 100 °C/212 °F). The project was closed in 2005 because of lack of funding. All of the equipment was scrapped and the site is abandoned since 2008.





Yup...that's the hole with the cap on it...8 miles deep under that cap...guess it's too small to shove Hummers into uh?

There are all kinds of internet hoaxes out there about microphones that recorded screams from millions of voices...
01-08-2014 01:10 AM
THE COYOTE
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nashorn101 View Post
Toilets in the northern hemisphere drain counterclockwise. While toilets in the Souther hemisphere drain clockwise.
False.

http://science.howstuffworks.com/sci...-baseball2.htm
01-08-2014 01:03 AM
Powrjunkey Odors are particles that contact nerves on the surface of your brain.

Odors have mass.

Think about that whenever you smell feces, vomit, rotten garbage, and farts! You can taste it, right?! Lol Nice thought, right? Rofl
01-02-2014 08:44 AM
sparky
Quote:
Originally Posted by krisbman View Post
Was a springfield 03A3 30.06 if im not mistaken.
No, it was an Italian 6.5 mm Carcano Model 91/38 carbine.
01-01-2014 05:06 PM
backwards Macy's Day parade was original started by Gimbels
01-01-2014 03:43 PM
Nashorn101 Toilets in the northern hemisphere drain counterclockwise. While toilets in the Souther hemisphere drain clockwise.
01-01-2014 03:17 PM
RJL1 ^^^^^^^^

Kinda scary since the Boston marathon atrocity.
01-01-2014 11:55 AM
jgmann "The Rose Parade now draws a live audience along the parade route of 700,000 people, 39 million Americans watching on television and hundreds of millions more watching in 220 countries around the world."
01-01-2014 09:29 AM
Bear Wrangler Chihuahuas have been known to run away from home after their owner passes away. Its also been known for them to wander about looking for them, and a lot of times ending up in cemeteries.
This thread has more than 30 replies. Click here to review the whole thread.

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:39 PM.



Jeep®, Wrangler, Liberty, Wagoneer, Cherokee, and Grand Cherokee are copyrighted and trademarked to Chrysler Motors LLC.
Wranglerforum.com is not in any way associated with the Chrysler Motors LLC