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Topic Review (Newest First)
02-28-2013 07:55 PM
BlueRidgeYJ
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeep21
Have any of you guys rigged something that shuts off with the ignition or can guide me towards something that will show me how to? New at this electrical stuff
http://www.amazon.com/80-AMP-RELAY-1...12v+100A+relay

Run 8 ga from the battery to post 30 on that, then from post 87 to your new fuse box. Run an ignition feed (18 or 20ga) from your original fuse box to post 86, then ground post 85.

I bet eboven could tell ya which slot in the fuse box to use, you'll want an empty one if possible, and be sure to place it on the fused side.

You can get higher amperage relays, 200A and beyond, but your fuse box will probably be ~100A. Don't exceed it or you'll melt it, and may start a fire.
02-28-2013 05:03 PM
Jeep21 Have any of you guys rigged something that shuts off with the ignition or can guide me towards something that will show me how to? New at this electrical stuff
02-28-2013 07:13 AM
eboven
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeep21 View Post
Wow! Extremely helpful! I was thinking on wiring it directly to the battery and incorporating a shutoff sensor where if the battery voltage drops too low it will disconnect power. Any tips on that?
We use these on police and emergency vehicles... they usually want their laptop to keep charging after the key is turned off. We set it for a 2 hour delay, so that 2 hours after the ignition is turned off the power drops. I agree with BlueRidgeYJ, though, why not just wire all of your lighting to ignition power so that it shuts off with the key? There doesn't seem to be any benefit from shutting lights down after an hour or two of inactivity...
02-27-2013 09:50 PM
BlueRidgeYJ
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeep21
I would want to incorporate such circuit for the lights. I tend to leave my lights on often and wouldn't want to have all sets of lights running and forget to turn them off when the engine isn't running.
So why not have them controlled off of an ignition trigger? Key off, no lights.
02-27-2013 08:58 PM
Jeep21 I plan on making a fitchbox for it. Just ordered the relays off Amazon for cheap.
02-25-2013 12:01 AM
Jeep21 I would want to incorporate such circuit for the lights. I tend to leave my lights on often and wouldn't want to have all sets of lights running and forget to turn them off when the engine isn't running.
02-24-2013 03:48 PM
Jerry Bransford
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeep21 View Post
Wow! Extremely helpful! I was thinking on wiring it directly to the battery and incorporating a shutoff sensor where if the battery voltage drops too low it will disconnect power. Any tips on that?
You're over-worrying about all this. In 15 years of using electric winches, I've never drained the single battery I use. Common sense battery management about winching is all you need to use. Similar to knowing not to leave your headlights on when the engine isn't running, just know you can't winch heavy loads all day without giving the battery a chance to charge back up again. That said, you won't even have to worry about that for 99.999% of the winching tasks we use our winches for. Heck I have had to winch my Jeep off the trail several times just off the battery when I couldn't start the engine. Even after that my battery still had enough power left to easily start my engine again once I fixed the engine problem... I didn't need a jump start for even those situations. Not to mention we can run our engines during most winching situations which helps provide power. Most winching jobs are over in a few minutes and that's not even close to putting you into a situation where you'd have to worry about the battery. The only time you'd have to worry about a winch draining your battery is if you were at the top of a hill and took on the job of continuously/non-stop winching an entire line of vehicles up an obstacle.
02-24-2013 08:27 AM
BlueRidgeYJ I am not familiar with disconnects, though they do exist. Do you mean for the lights or winch? You should really be winching with the engine running.

There are also audible battery voltage alarms that go off at 10.8-11.2 usually, which is about when you want them to. They don't stop anything but sound like a firealarm when low voltage is detected.

Note to my above post, the power leg from the relay to the light/fan/load connects to terminal (87) of the relay. And every (2) 100W lights is 17A, every (2) 55W lights is 10A (as far as actual steady consumption).
02-23-2013 11:57 PM
Jeep21 Wow! Extremely helpful! I was thinking on wiring it directly to the battery and incorporating a shutoff sensor where if the battery voltage drops too low it will disconnect power. Any tips on that?
02-23-2013 08:05 PM
BlueRidgeYJ
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeep21
I'll be installing a 12000 lbs winch an aux fan and a few sets of lights. About 5 total applications. Would it be bad to do an overkill on the relays lets say use 80 amp relays?
What I would do (did, actually):

Get a fuse box, a fan relay and (2) 30A relays (40A are fine, whatever the part store has):

Blue Sea Systems has pretty awesome fuse boxes, like this http://www.amazon.com/Blue-Sea-Syste...ef=pd_sbs_sg_4 , or you can get a cheapy exposed one for 8$ at the parts store.
The fan relay is dependent on your fan. They pull anywhere from 15A to 50A, depending on make/model.
Light relays are 5$ and all over the part store, 30 or 40A.
You will also need at least 14ga wire for 55W, 12ga for 100W, for best light output, and smaller control wire.
They sell relay harnesses if you keep a tidy house, not required though. Spade connectors work just as well.

Run an 8ga wire to the fuse box input post straight from the battery (keep it close or it needs a fuse, too). Don't hook it up to the pos post until all other wiring is complete.
Run an appropriate wire from a fuse box output slot to the 'power in' terminal (30) on one of your light relays.
Run an 18ga wire from a fuse box output slot to your switch (note: you may want bigger wire to run a control panel for multiple switches instead of a wire for each switch - mine is 14ga, allowing all the switches I want). Connect the other lead on the switch to the 'control input' terminal (86) on the relay.
Run the same size wire used to terminal (86) to ground terminal (85), the ground terminal.
Run the same size wire used to terminal (30) to run a power line to the first light. You can buy 3 way connectors, or do what i did. Slice open the pos line, "skin" about an inch of the insulation off, and splice in an equal gauge wire by soldering the connection. I am sure youtube can elaborate. Connect the splice to light one and run the original wire to light two.
Repeat as needed for light pairs. If you are after all lights on one switch we can do that, too, but it gets a little trickier depending on how many/how bright.

Do the same thing for the fan, through the fuse box, assuming it a lower amperage (<30A) fan, hooking into the relays the same way. If it is higher amperage fan it and (4) 100W lights may exceed the fuse box ampacity.

You can trigger the entire fuse box off an ignition source with a relay, or leave it wired to work without the key - or do one of each.

As for the winch, it depends on the type of solenoid(s) you have as to how to wire it, but in cab switches are very possible and - as Jerry said - require no relays.

(2) 55W lights = 15A fuse
(2) 100W lights = 20A fuse
Switch control = 5A fuse
I run 3 relay controlled switches and 5 low watt interior lights off my interior leg, all on a 10A fuse, which any 18ga will handle and I can have it all on at once. I ran 14ga though. What can I say, I had more of it laying around, lol.

You can always upgrade your headlights to relay controlled higher gauge wiring while youre in there, best mod I've done so far.

You can find some 5 post relays, that simplifies it a bit, but this way I found to be simlplest with common parts.
02-23-2013 06:18 PM
Jerry Bransford
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeep21 View Post
How would I wire the winch then?
Yep, a winch needs to have both of its power leads connected directly to the battery posts. Don't try to take a shortcut by just grounding the winch's black lead to the chassis, doing that would fry/pop most of the Jeep's internal ground connections the first time your winch was pulling a heavy load.

You can wire in an in-out winch control switch for the winch inside the cab but that is a low-current circuit so it won't need a relay.
02-23-2013 05:37 PM
Jeep21 In cab would be ideal!
02-23-2013 05:27 PM
BlueRidgeYJ Straight from the battery. The solenoid acts as a relay of sorts. Are you trying to wire an incab switch or just regular style?
02-23-2013 03:02 PM
Jeep21 How would I wire the winch then?
02-23-2013 02:31 PM
Jerry Bransford Don't even think about connecting a winch to a relay, winches can easily draw in excess of 400 amps during a full load. Not to mention a 12,000 lb. capacity winch is excessive and will most are heavier so they just add unnecessary weight. Winch-wise, I'd go with nothing higher than a 9,000 to 9,500 lb. capacity winch.
02-23-2013 01:40 PM
Jeep21 I'll be installing a 12000 lbs winch an aux fan and a few sets of lights. About 5 total applications. Would it be bad to do an overkill on the relays lets say use 80 amp relays?
02-22-2013 03:20 PM
Jerry Bransford SPST = single pole single throw, which is basically a simple on-off switch.

SPDT = single pole double throw, which means it is used to connect something to either of two possible connections. A SPDT switch or relay would not typically be used for lights, though most of the relays we use for driving lights are indeed SPDT... but you only use the two on-off (SPST) connections with the other possible connector (that makes it a SPDT) lug simply being left unused.
02-22-2013 02:28 PM
Jeep21 Is an SPST the same thing as an SPDT relay? And would it matter if the relay can handle way more than what the electronics will pull?
02-22-2013 06:43 AM
BlueRidgeYJ Watts over volts equals amps, so...

200W / 12V = 16.67A

That's all the amperage (2) 100W lights will pull. Do the same math on your fan, a 30 may do the trick.
02-21-2013 10:51 PM
Jeep21
Relays

Are all relays the same? I'm looking to buy some relays to withstand a pair of 100W lights and an aux fan for the radiator. Will 60A SPDT relays work for these things? Thanks in advanced.

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