Jeep Wrangler Forum - Reply to Topic
Jeep Wrangler Forum

Go Back   Jeep Wrangler Forum > TJ Jeep Wrangler Forum > TJ Tech Forum > Electric Fan Conversion

Join Wrangler Forum Today


Thread: Electric Fan Conversion Reply to Thread
Title:
  
Message:
Post Icons
You may choose an icon for your message from the following list:
 

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Jeep Wrangler Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Additional Options
Miscellaneous Options

Topic Review (Newest First)
03-26-2013 07:30 PM
UnlimitedLJ04 a good electric fan may pull more air at idle than your stock fan, with the fan clutch disengaged, but you get the engine up in the RPMs a little with that fan clutch engaged and the mechanical fan wins by a landslide.
03-26-2013 07:27 PM
freeskier
Quote:
Originally Posted by qball73 View Post
That constant stream of water is cool going in, so yes the temp. would stay lower. Circulating the same water over and over through a hot engine makes the water....wait for it.....hot. That's where the fan helps.
You made an oversimplified comment that you need a fan to control temperature, I made an oversimplified example where you don't need a fan. Neither really make sense.

And yes, I have very long hose.
03-26-2013 07:24 PM
qball73 ...and yes, i replied to the wrong quote....GO ME!
03-26-2013 07:23 PM
freeskier
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sinister6 View Post
Gonna have to disagree with you and well agree with you. I disagree with regards "temperature of the engine is completely controlled the thermostat." If that is the case why the fan at all? It does mean a cooler engine because the air pulled through the radiator is cooled quicker when the fan is running at 100% regardless of engine speed and when the thermostat opens that cooler coolent goes through the engine...cooling it.

I do agree with you with regards to engine temp being controlled by thermostat, not completely though, the fan plays an important role... the amount of air flow through the radiator when the thermostat is open determines how cool that coolent will be re-entering the engine. HOT coolent going back into the engine doesn't cool the engine...

And yes my engine was hot when I did the test with the fan clutch... and it simply shows the amount of air the fan is pulling through the radiator at an idle. When the fan has to PULL all the air because nothing is being PUSHED through it. I personally don't run my rpms really high in 4lo so I wanted to make sure I had good air flow through the radiator and across my engine.

If the clutch fan works for you that's great...I prefer the electric option.
This is where smart engineering comes in. The engineers at Jeep did lots and lots of math to relate air temperature the coolant temperature and decided what is acceptable for regular use. It's obviously inefficient to have either mechanical or electric spinning all the time. If your pushing the system hard your going to reach the "maximum capacity" of the system. At that point a fan can only do so much and your probably better off with a larger radiator. Again, more complicated math to figure out the diminishing return of more air vs. larger radiator.

Really my point is most people grossly oversimplify the cooling system. The Jeep engineers smartly designed the system and it works for me and have yet to be able to push it beyond what they originally designed. If I get to that point I'll look into modifying the system.
03-26-2013 07:23 PM
qball73
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sinister6 View Post

You must have one very long hose...
That constant stream of water is cool going in, so yes the temp. would stay lower. Circulating the same water over and over through a hot engine makes the water....wait for it.....hot. That's where the fan helps.
03-26-2013 07:15 PM
Sinister6
Quote:
Originally Posted by freeskier View Post
No, you don't need a fan at all. Pull the upper radiator hose, keep a constant stream of water into the radiator (a garden hose for example), let the engine run, what happens?

You must have one very long hose...
03-26-2013 07:13 PM
Sinister6
Quote:
Originally Posted by freeskier View Post
It does NOT mean a cooler engine, the temperature of the engine is completely controlled the thermostat. At idle you simply don't need much air going through the radiator. Your pulling more air, simple as that and unnecessarily at that.

That's not a very good comparison either. Likely when you did that test the clutch wasn't fully engaged, because it doesn't need to be. Now yes, most electric fans can probably pull more air through at idle, but if you compared it to the fan clutch fully engaged I doubt you'd see much of a difference when performing that same test.

Also, in 4lo, my engine RPMs are pretty darn high. High enough to pull way more air through the radiator than some electric fan.
Gonna have to disagree with you and well agree with you. I disagree with regards "temperature of the engine is completely controlled the thermostat." If that is the case why the fan at all? It does mean a cooler engine because the air pulled through the radiator is cooled quicker when the fan is running at 100% regardless of engine speed and when the thermostat opens that cooler coolent goes through the engine...cooling it.

I do agree with you with regards to engine temp being controlled by thermostat, not completely though, the fan plays an important role... the amount of air flow through the radiator when the thermostat is open determines how cool that coolent will be re-entering the engine. HOT coolent going back into the engine doesn't cool the engine...

And yes my engine was hot when I did the test with the fan clutch... and it simply shows the amount of air the fan is pulling through the radiator at an idle. When the fan has to PULL all the air because nothing is being PUSHED through it. I personally don't run my rpms really high in 4lo so I wanted to make sure I had good air flow through the radiator and across my engine.

If the clutch fan works for you that's great...I prefer the electric option.
03-26-2013 07:09 PM
freeskier No, you don't need a fan at all. Pull the upper radiator hose, keep a constant stream of water into the radiator (a garden hose for example), let the engine run, what happens?
03-26-2013 07:03 PM
qball73
Quote:
Originally Posted by freeskier View Post

It does NOT mean a cooler engine, the temperature of the engine is completely controlled the thermostat. At idle you simply don't need much air going through the radiator. Your pulling more air, simple as that and unnecessarily at that.

That's not a very good comparison either. Likely when you did that test the clutch wasn't fully engaged, because it doesn't need to be. Now yes, most electric fans can probably pull more air through at idle, but if you compared it to the fan clutch fully engaged I doubt you'd see much of a difference when performing that same test.

Also, in 4lo, my engine RPMs are pretty darn high. High enough to pull way more air through the radiator than some electric fan.
I installed an electric fan on a truck i used to own and i immediately noticed 1) increased power, 2) my engine ran MUCH cooler. No it wasn't a signuficant power increase, but it was noticeable. Also, if the temp. was totally controlled by thermostat then you wouldn't need a fan.

I recommend them, but that's just my 2 cents.
03-26-2013 06:46 PM
freeskier
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sinister6 View Post
I recently switched to an electric fan for several reasons. Less strain on the engine and more efficent air flow. My electric fan is rated at 3300 CFM at 100% capacity. When you're wheeling, crawling, your engine rpm's are low, less air being PULLED through radiator, less air being PUSHED through radiator by driving forward so the clutch driven fan is also pulling less air through the radiator even as the thermostate on the fan opens up it's not pulling the same amount of air it would be at say 50 mph.
My electric fan is set up based coolent temp...probe in top radiator hose. It runs at 60% when it first turns on, then with a 10 degree engine temp increase the fan increases the speed to 100% of it's capacity. I also have a manual ON override wired in...meaning I can turn the fan on with a switch and it will run at 100% regardless of thermostat. So when I'm rock crawling the fan is pulling max air through radiator and keeping engine cool, regardless of my RPM's or speed.

Before I installed it, I held up 3 full sheets of paper toweling in front of radiator at 30" away. The paper towel fell to the floor with clutch driven fan. When I did the same thing with the electric fan they were pulled into the radiator! That's increased air flow, a cooler running engine...

The arguement about water crossings...how often do you realistically cross water that deep? And if you are in water that deep you have bigger issues than your fan running. My fan, sure I can pull the fuse and shut it off if in water that deep...that would be going through water 34" deep! How often do you go through water that deep?

I should add that I intially ran the probe that pushes through the radiator, I was not getting good heat transfer to probe so fan did not work as it should. So I switched to the Varible speed sensor that operates through the screw in sensor in top radiator hose.

Hope this helps. There are some that would put a snorkel on and others that say it's a waste, the same arguement with the electric fan could be made. In the end, YOU have to make the decision for your rig...
It does NOT mean a cooler engine, the temperature of the engine is completely controlled the thermostat. At idle you simply don't need much air going through the radiator. Your pulling more air, simple as that and unnecessarily at that.

That's not a very good comparison either. Likely when you did that test the clutch wasn't fully engaged, because it doesn't need to be. Now yes, most electric fans can probably pull more air through at idle, but if you compared it to the fan clutch fully engaged I doubt you'd see much of a difference when performing that same test.

Also, in 4lo, my engine RPMs are pretty darn high. High enough to pull way more air through the radiator than some electric fan.
03-26-2013 06:37 PM
Sinister6 I recently switched to an electric fan for several reasons. Less strain on the engine and more efficent air flow. My electric fan is rated at 3300 CFM at 100% capacity. When you're wheeling, crawling, your engine rpm's are low, less air being PULLED through radiator, less air being PUSHED through radiator by driving forward so the clutch driven fan is also pulling less air through the radiator even as the thermostate on the fan opens up it's not pulling the same amount of air it would be at say 50 mph.
My electric fan is set up based coolent temp...probe in top radiator hose. It runs at 60% when it first turns on, then with a 10 degree engine temp increase the fan increases the speed to 100% of it's capacity. I also have a manual ON override wired in...meaning I can turn the fan on with a switch and it will run at 100% regardless of thermostat. So when I'm rock crawling the fan is pulling max air through radiator and keeping engine cool, regardless of my RPM's or speed.

Before I installed it, I held up 3 full sheets of paper toweling in front of radiator at 30" away. The paper towel fell to the floor with clutch driven fan. When I did the same thing with the electric fan they were pulled into the radiator! That's increased air flow, a cooler running engine...

The arguement about water crossings...how often do you realistically cross water that deep? And if you are in water that deep you have bigger issues than your fan running. My fan, sure I can pull the fuse and shut it off if in water that deep...that would be going through water 34" deep! How often do you go through water that deep?

I should add that I intially ran the probe that pushes through the radiator, I was not getting good heat transfer to probe so fan did not work as it should. So I switched to the Varible speed sensor that operates through the screw in sensor in top radiator hose.

Hope this helps. There are some that would put a snorkel on and others that say it's a waste, the same arguement with the electric fan could be made. In the end, YOU have to make the decision for your rig...
03-26-2013 05:07 PM
thecrookedknot
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cons_Table View Post
The only real benefit to an electric fan is if you are going to be doing a lot of deep water crossings. Other than that, stick with the stock fan.
Thanks
03-26-2013 05:04 PM
Cons_Table The only real benefit to an electric fan is if you are going to be doing a lot of deep water crossings. Other than that, stick with the stock fan.
03-26-2013 05:02 PM
thecrookedknot
Quote:
Originally Posted by freeskier View Post
The most cost effective way is to not do the conversion and keep what works.
So just keep my clutch driven fan and bag the electric fan?
03-26-2013 04:57 PM
freeskier The most cost effective way is to not do the conversion and keep what works.
03-26-2013 04:55 PM
thecrookedknot
Electric Fan Conversion

What is the most cost effective way to do a electric fan conversion for my 2000 Jeep Wrangler? I currently have a stock radiator, but it is leaaking. So I have ordered a 3 core Champion Radiator.

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:28 AM.



Jeep®, Wrangler, Liberty, Wagoneer, Cherokee, and Grand Cherokee are copyrighted and trademarked to Chrysler Motors LLC.
Wranglerforum.com is not in any way associated with the Chrysler Motors LLC