Jeep Wrangler Forum - Reply to Topic
Jeep Wrangler Forum

Go Back   Jeep Wrangler Forum > JK Jeep Wrangler Forum > JK General Discussion Forum > Latest IIHS "Small Overlap" Crash Test

Join Wrangler Forum Today


Thread: Latest IIHS "Small Overlap" Crash Test Reply to Thread
Title:
  
Message:
Post Icons
You may choose an icon for your message from the following list:
 

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Jeep Wrangler Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Additional Options
Miscellaneous Options

Topic Review (Newest First)
05-17-2013 05:55 AM
dieselgiant Remember though its trail rated.......
05-16-2013 08:14 PM
JKWrangler2012 I hope I'm wearing eye protection if I ever get tboned. Sheech that's a lot of glass!
05-16-2013 03:09 PM
BacaraJKU Side impact is way better than I had expected. Good to see since I normally have the kids in the car.
05-16-2013 02:40 PM
jkmohican
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivoryring View Post

"All the energy" is only true if the metal bumper doesn't deform at all. The goal of crumple/crush zones is to shed as much energy in the crush/crumple action as possible so that a lower portion makes it to the occupants. In a crash "paper thin" and "rock solid" are both bad ends of the spectrum... a happy middle in between is what is needed.
This is true. The metal bumper will "crush" and "crumple" but only so much. I, for example, have a Full width 85lb steel bumper with a short stinger. The design of the bumper is pretty easy to figure out. It has weak spots all along certain areas that are most likely prone to an accident (sides) and can crush, leaving less energy for me (driver) to absorb. But with some bumpers, at least from a physics stand point, they are just blocks of steel, in which case, "all the energy" goes to YOU and the body of the jeep. But I agree, a well sculpted metal bumper will be the best bet, because the plastic bumper will crush too much, and a big metal block bumper won't crush at all.
05-16-2013 01:50 PM
Ivoryring
Quote:
Originally Posted by jkmohican View Post
I think that with a full size metal bumper, the jeep itself will be better "looking" but their will be more damage, due to the lack of Cushioning that the stock bumper provides. All the energy that the metal bumper will see will get transferred to the body and people inside the jeep due to the metal not "crushing" so the energy isn't absorbed, causing more integral damage to the jeep, as opposed to the soft stock bumper that will absorb more of the force, so it may look worse, but you as a person will be better off.
"All the energy" is only true if the metal bumper doesn't deform at all. The goal of crumple/crush zones is to shed as much energy in the crush/crumple action as possible so that a lower portion makes it to the occupants. In a crash "paper thin" and "rock solid" are both bad ends of the spectrum... a happy middle in between is what is needed.

Obviously IIHS performs these tests to get controlled samples rather than relying on real world varying crashes.

I would be interested in seeing shots of full offroad bumpers after actual crashes and/or animal impacts - I'm sure that the ends, hanging out past the frame rails do get crushed.
05-16-2013 01:47 PM
NFRs2000NYC
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivoryring View Post
Watch the video of the small overlap - the bumper contact looks like it is in the 'all plastic' portion, so nearly entire impact looks to be borne by the driver side tire/axle/control arms. The impact point on this test looks like it is intended to be '25% of the front cross section'... and since most of that 25% is just the fender flare, which hardly counts as 'crumple zone'... the impact edge is just a few inches into the grill, and by my eye it looks like the hood and side act don't crumple so much as they act as a wedge creating a passenger-wards force overall.

Looking at this really makes me think a full width steel bumper would make a big difference in this type of crash. The energy it takes to destroy the bumper should mean there is less available to make it into the occupant space.
The minor offset test looks like it is completely outside the driver's side frame rail, meaning, there is zero crumple protection there.
05-16-2013 01:46 PM
NFRs2000NYC
Quote:
Originally Posted by jkmohican View Post
I think that with a full size metal bumper, the jeep itself will be better "looking" but their will be more damage, due to the lack of Cushioning that the stock bumper provides. All the energy that the metal bumper will see will get transferred to the body and people inside the jeep due to the metal not "crushing" so the energy isn't absorbed, causing more integral damage to the jeep, as opposed to the soft stock bumper that will absorb more of the force, so it may look worse, but you as a person will be better off.
This would be true if the Jeep struck a solid object like a giant rock. I'd say 90% of things hit (the entire point of the offset test if for oncoming traffic accidents) are "crushable" like other vehicles...in which case, the crushing forces will be multiplied and transferred to the other object like the other car.
05-16-2013 01:43 PM
Ivoryring Watch the video of the small overlap - the bumper contact looks like it is in the 'all plastic' portion, so nearly entire impact looks to be borne by the driver side tire/axle/control arms. The impact point on this test looks like it is intended to be '25% of the front cross section'... and since most of that 25% is just the fender flare, which hardly counts as 'crumple zone'... the impact edge is just a few inches into the grill, and by my eye it looks like the hood and side act don't crumple so much as they act as a wedge creating a passenger-wards force overall.

Looking at this really makes me think a full width steel bumper would make a big difference in this type of crash. The energy it takes to destroy the bumper should mean there is less available to make it into the occupant space.
05-16-2013 01:40 PM
jkmohican I think that with a full size metal bumper, the jeep itself will be better "looking" but their will be more damage, due to the lack of Cushioning that the stock bumper provides. All the energy that the metal bumper will see will get transferred to the body and people inside the jeep due to the metal not "crushing" so the energy isn't absorbed, causing more integral damage to the jeep, as opposed to the soft stock bumper that will absorb more of the force, so it may look worse, but you as a person will be better off.
05-16-2013 01:28 PM
NFRs2000NYC Would love to see them test a COD model or something like it, and see how different the results are with a steel bumper.
05-16-2013 01:25 PM
RaiderRUBICON A Rubicon would of scored higher.





lol
05-16-2013 12:45 PM
aypanthony I would think that metal flares would be ripped off in the same manner.

However, a heavy duty full width winch bumper may help deflect some of the impact.
05-16-2013 12:40 PM
hayoCT So would aftermarket fender flares take the brunt of the force shown in the small overlap test any better than the Mopars?
05-16-2013 12:02 PM
aypanthony
Quote:
Originally Posted by cosmos View Post
so if you think you might hit something, don't clip it, ram it. Noted.
Yes. The small overlap test is difficult for vehicles to do well on because the barrier impact bypass's many of the crash hardened areas of a vehicle. Vehicles that historically received 5 star ratings, are failing this test.
05-16-2013 11:51 AM
Lynskey Ah I didin't catch the 2 different test types. I thought they were the same and questioned the padding difference.
05-16-2013 11:40 AM
aypanthony
Quote:
Originally Posted by panthermark View Post
I don't think it is padded, but no matter what, they are different tests. One is a small overlay (2 door, almost glances), the other is a moderate overlay (4 door, about half of the front end impacts).
Yes, different tests. IIHS hasn't released the small overlap results for the JKU yet. It should perform similarly, I would guess.
05-16-2013 11:37 AM
cosmos so if you think you might hit something, don't clip it, ram it. Noted.
05-16-2013 11:05 AM
panthermark
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lynskey View Post
Why is the 2-door hitting a virtual steel corner and the 4-door hitting a padded corner? Totally different materials?
I don't think it is padded, but no matter what, they are different tests. One is a small overlay (2 door, almost glances), the other is a moderate overlay (4 door, about half of the front end impacts).
05-16-2013 11:01 AM
legitposter
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lynskey View Post
Why is the 2-door hitting a virtual steel corner and the 4-door hitting a padded corner? Totally different materials?
Because drivers of 2 doors tend to drive in areas with steel beside the roadway while drivers of 4 doors tend to drive in areas with padding along the roadway.
05-16-2013 10:57 AM
Lynskey Why is the 2-door hitting a virtual steel corner and the 4-door hitting a padded corner? Totally different materials?
05-16-2013 10:52 AM
David M Here are the videos...

2013 Jeep Wrangler 2-door 40 mph small overlap front test

Overall evaluation: Marginal

2013 Jeep Wrangler 2-door small overlap test - YouTube


2008 Jeep Wrangler 4-door 40 mph moderate overlap front test

Overall evaluation: Good

2008 Jeep Wrangler 4-door moderate overlap test - YouTube
05-16-2013 10:09 AM
panthermark Wow, the 4 door did pretty good in the moderate catagory.

IIHS-HLDI: Jeep Wrangler 4-door

I'd like to see the side impact numbers with airbags.
05-16-2013 09:55 AM
legitposter So what they're saying is dont get into a massive accident in any vehicle. Thanks IIHS, got it!
05-16-2013 09:37 AM
aypanthony
Latest IIHS "Small Overlap" Crash Test

Just wanted to post this, since many people are concerned with safety. I thought the JK did fairly well considering the extreme nature of the test. I assume they didn't use the hardtop, since this would represent the worst case scenario.

IIHS-HLDI: Jeep Wrangler 2-door

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:05 PM.



Jeep®, Wrangler, Liberty, Wagoneer, Cherokee, and Grand Cherokee are copyrighted and trademarked to Chrysler Motors LLC.
Wranglerforum.com is not in any way associated with the Chrysler Motors LLC