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Topic Review (Newest First)
05-23-2013 03:50 AM
Brasco20
Quote:
Originally Posted by n00g7 View Post
Stop trolling. You know cantaloupes are wrong. Honeydew is right.

If you weren't so daft you'd know that:

Cantaloupes: Originally, cantaloupe referred only to the non-netted, orange-fleshed melons of Europe. However, in more recent usage, it has come to mean any orange-fleshed melon (C. melo). Cantaloupe is the most popular variety of melon in the United States.[2]

Honeydew:
A honeydew has a round to slightly oval shape, typically 15–22 cm (5.9–8.7 in) long. It generally ranges in weight from 1.8 to 3.6 kg (4.0 to 7.9 lb). The flesh is usually pale green in color, while the smooth peel ranges from greenish to yellow. Like most fruit, honeydew has seeds. Honeydew's thick, juicy, sweet flesh is often eaten for dessert, and is commonly found in supermarkets across the world. This fruit grows best in semiarid climates and is harvested based on maturity, not size. Maturity can be hard to judge, but is based upon ground color ranging from greenish white (immature) to creamy yellow (mature).[1] Quality is also determined by the honeydew having a nearly spherical shape with a surface free of scars or defects. Also, a honeydew should feel heavy for its size and have a waxy (not fuzzy) surface.

Hence, after observing the above definitions, you should know that honeydew is the better melon and correct answer. Ergo, I am right and you are wrong.
Awesome!!! Too funny Man!!
05-22-2013 07:30 PM
Dusthol This thread is still alive?
05-22-2013 12:43 PM
ChopperCopper I thought we were talking about melons?
05-22-2013 09:51 AM
JandS
Quote:
Originally Posted by michiganadam View Post
That looks like a JK. Have you ever noticed the jk lacks a throttle cable? Theres a motor on the throttle air valve (on electronic fuel injection, throttle is only for air....fuel is injected electronically by throttle position sensor and oxygen sensor readings). And a sensor on the pedal.

If the throttle on a jk did mechanically jam open, there would be no way to unstick it. You would have to turn the key Off. Brakes are also more powerful than the engine, but all this requires you to have a presence of mind. The oh crap!! Factor keeps you from thinking.

I did have the throttle stick on an old f250. I smacked it wide open on a city street being a jackass and next thing you know, that 351 came to life and wouldnt back down...... it took me about a block to get it stopped...i had to shut the ignition off and then reach my foot under the pedal to close the carburetor...
Actually, when your throttle is open you have very little brake pressure because the engine isn't producing enough vacuum. You need to be a gorilla at that point to stop the vehicle.

Your master cylinder will save some vacuum to allow one good braking maneuver, expecting the rpms to drop and vacuum to increase. But if you tap the brakes, you're going to lose that stored energy and bad things can happen.



Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenSahara00 View Post
Some of you make me sick, not just with your sheer ignorance, but your complete lack of logic, and the resulting garbage you are spewing out as your opinion. You can play the blame game all you want, but some of the things being said in this thread are just plain stupid. We are surrounded by "risk" at all times. Every moment of our lives. If something is not done with intention, it is an accident.
Exactly.
05-22-2013 01:51 AM
dragginwagon406 How about another? Not saying it's the cause but from the casual bystanders perspective, it does make me think.

ETC Electrinic Throttle Control Problem - JKowners.com : Jeep Wrangler JK Forum
05-21-2013 09:41 PM
brighton No, damn you! Honeydew has seeds and is pale green in color. There is a reason cantaloupe are the most popular variety of melon in the United States. Cantaloupes are the best. You are wrong and I am right!
05-21-2013 08:09 PM
n00g7 Stop trolling. You know cantaloupes are wrong. Honeydew is right.

If you weren't so daft you'd know that:

Cantaloupes: Originally, cantaloupe referred only to the non-netted, orange-fleshed melons of Europe. However, in more recent usage, it has come to mean any orange-fleshed melon (C. melo). Cantaloupe is the most popular variety of melon in the United States.[2]

Honeydew:
A honeydew has a round to slightly oval shape, typically 15–22 cm (5.9–8.7 in) long. It generally ranges in weight from 1.8 to 3.6 kg (4.0 to 7.9 lb). The flesh is usually pale green in color, while the smooth peel ranges from greenish to yellow. Like most fruit, honeydew has seeds. Honeydew's thick, juicy, sweet flesh is often eaten for dessert, and is commonly found in supermarkets across the world. This fruit grows best in semiarid climates and is harvested based on maturity, not size. Maturity can be hard to judge, but is based upon ground color ranging from greenish white (immature) to creamy yellow (mature).[1] Quality is also determined by the honeydew having a nearly spherical shape with a surface free of scars or defects. Also, a honeydew should feel heavy for its size and have a waxy (not fuzzy) surface.

Hence, after observing the above definitions, you should know that honeydew is the better melon and correct answer. Ergo, I am right and you are wrong.
05-21-2013 07:20 PM
Dusthol Mmmm cantaloupes.
05-21-2013 07:36 AM
m998dna
Quote:
Originally Posted by DJL2 View Post
M998 - a guy with HMMWV nomenclature in his "handle" cannot be taken seriously on a Jeep forum...just sayin'.
I look at it from a different perspective, anyone that doesn't know Jeep's history can't be taken seriously on a Jeep forum... just sayin'.



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AM_General

Quote:
AM General traces its roots to the Standard Wheel Company of Terre Haute, Indiana, which expanded in 1903 to include the Overland Automotive Division. In 1908, John North Willys purchased the Overland company, then based in Indianapolis, Indiana, and renamed it Willys-Overland Motors, Inc. In the 1940s, Willys-Overland developed a vehicle to U.S. Army's requirements and later mass-produced "America's first four-wheel drive one-fourth-ton tactical utility truck" - the Jeep of World War II fame. In 1953, Kaiser Motors purchased Willys-Overland, and changed the name to Willys Motor Company. In 1963 the company's name changed again to Kaiser-Jeep Corporation. In 1964, Kaiser-Jeep purchased the Studebaker facilities in South Bend, Indiana, and formed the Defense and Government Products Division in 1967, which after American Motors purchased Kaiser-Jeep became what is now AM General.

1975 AM General RHD postal delivery van AM General's roots (and its location in South Bend) also lie with the "General Products Division" of Studebaker, which, along with its substantial defense contracts, was acquired by Kaiser Industries in early 1964 after Studebaker closed its U.S. auto manufacturing operations. At the time, Kaiser had been awarded a US$87 million Army truck contract, and under government pressure agreed to perform the work at the South Bend plant it had recently acquired from Studebaker. Subsequently, American Motors Corporation (AMC) purchased the Jeep Corporation from Kaiser in 1970 when Kaiser itself decided to leave the auto business. In 1971, AMC made the General Products Division of Jeep (producing military trucks, as well as contract and non-commercial vehicles) a wholly owned subsidiary and renamed it AM General Corporation.
.
05-21-2013 06:00 AM
ChopperCopper
Quote:
Originally Posted by n00g7 View Post
I like melons, especially the green ones.
I like cantaloup.
05-21-2013 05:47 AM
DJL2 M998 - a guy with HMMWV nomenclature in his "handle" cannot be taken seriously on a Jeep forum...just sayin'.
05-21-2013 01:13 AM
JayDubya
Quote:
Originally Posted by jpedmundson View Post

Trying to make up for the "C" you got in Torts I, or a case you lost once? JK, lol.
LOL!!!! Man, I'll be straight up and tell you civil law bores me to tears! Hahaha!!! I've been stressed with moving and really needed this laugh--thanks!! I was a B student in Torts, but I still don't like it. I'm a full time prosecutor and wouldn't have it any other way.
05-21-2013 12:24 AM
n00g7 I like melons, especially the green ones.
05-21-2013 12:14 AM
David M
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenSahara00 View Post
Some of you make me sick, not just with your sheer ignorance, but your complete lack of logic, and the resulting garbage you are spewing out as your opinion. You can play the blame game all you want, but some of the things being said in this thread are just plain stupid. We are surrounded by "risk" at all times. Every moment of our lives. If something is not done with intention, it is an accident.
Golden Sahara, you've written 'you' and 'your' a half dozen times in this one post alone. Who exactly are you talking about, "or targeting" to use your words from another post. None of what you're writing makes much sense, unless we the readers can put what your trying to say into the complete context of the thread. If you're going to point fingers, try pointing them in the right direction.
05-20-2013 11:50 PM
jpedmundson
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayDubya View Post
This is how: While intent is a required element for crimes other than strict-liability crimes, a drunk driver that kills another motorist is acting "recklessly"...acting in reckless and wanton behavior that shows disregard or indifference to the safety and value of human life or serious bodily injury. Another "buzz word" would be acting in "gross negligence" such that the culpable actions rise to the level of criminal liability. Recklessness/gross negligence satisfies the intent element for non strict liability crimes. That's just an fyi...not insinuating criminal liability in this tragic occurrence. An example of a strict liability crime would be running a stop sign or statutory rape.

There are undoubtedly liability issues here, joint and several, premises liability, failure to warn (depending on spectators' status as licensee, invitee, etc),which varies the duties owed to the spectators to be warned even about open and obvious dangers (think wet spot on grocery store floor) vs dangers that are or should be legally foreseeable, not to mention whether this jurisdiction follows comparative-negligence theory, contributory negligence theory, or a modified comparative negligence theory. Way too many unknown factors to argue about. :-)

J
Trying to make up for the "C" you got in Torts I, or a case you lost once? JK, lol.
05-20-2013 11:17 PM
michiganadam
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenSahara00 View Post
I never said anything along those lines. People keep saying this wasn't an accident. It most definitely was an accident. Blaming everyone and everything thinkable for something that no one could ever foresee happening is ridiculous. The people making these speculations are obviously grossly uneducated and inexperienced in these types of situations.




I wasn't targeting you. at all. I agree with what you just said. If the vehicle malfunctioned the driver shouldn't be responsible at all. No one should be. From what I have gathered this event was as safe as was practically possible. I have done this many times. I can't see how the vehicle could have hit the girl and ended up on it's side by simply slipping off the other tire, even if it were in gear and running! Either the driver made a grave mistake, or there was a major mechanical failure. I'm not trying to defend anyone, but I don't believe in trying to shift blame where it doesn't belong. It also disgusts me how people are so much more passionate about blaming someone and punishing them, then mourning the loss of a young life... What's really more important? It's not as if this act was committed in cold blood.
I know you werent targeting me. Infact i assumed you hadnt even seen my post.
05-20-2013 09:10 PM
MichaelEdwardsDO The court of public opinion is now adjourned. Y'all have been at this way too long
05-20-2013 08:43 PM
ChopperCopper I'm bored already.
05-20-2013 08:13 PM
ChopperCopper I've already admitted to the semantics. And I've already stated that just because this was an "accident" in your terms, doesn't mean that the driver is not responsible.

My whole point is that the driver is responsible regardless if he didn't mean it.
05-20-2013 07:35 PM
m998dna
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChopperCopper View Post
My only disagreement is that every says "accident" to excuse or diminish the responsibility of the driver.

I have said many times, an accident is something caused by nature, i.e., a falling tree or even a stuck throttle.

Let's try this: Preventable vs. Non-Preventable.

Was this crash preventable?

Well? What say you?

Let's see what Thesaurus.com and God has to say about the definition of an accident...

Quote:
Main Entry: accident

Part of Speech: noun

Definition: unexpected, undesirable event; often physically injurious

Synonyms: blow, calamity, casualty, collision, crack-up, disaster, fender-bender, fluke, hazard, misadventure, misfortune, mishap, pileup, rear-ender, setback, smash, smashup, stack-up, total, wrack-up.
Quote:
MainEntry: act of God

Part of Speech: noun

Definition: divine act

Synonyms: accident, circumstances beyond one's control, earthquake, force of nature, freak accident, hurricane, inevitable accident, natural disaster, phenomenon, supernatural event, tornado, unavoidable casualty, unforeseen event.
05-20-2013 07:26 PM
dragginwagon406
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChopperCopper View Post
My only disagreement is that every says "accident" to excuse or diminish the responsibility of the driver.

I have said many times, an accident is something caused by nature, i.e., a falling tree or even a stuck throttle.

Let's try this: Preventable vs. Non-Preventable.

Was this crash preventable?

Well? What say you?
I say this Monday morning quarter back don't have the answers to these questions as they pertain to this situation.

With hindsight being 20/20, everything is preventable. Hell, I could prevent traffic crashes, car maintenance, fuel consumption and a healthy part of my carbon footprint...if I wanted to live in a bubble and telecommute.

Might as well prevent all accidental drownings while were at it - outlaw large bodies of water or at least make sure they are covered, guarded and have signs letting you know that ingesting large amounts of water while breathing may cause death.

How far do you want to go? The list of things we can prevent is endless...of course liberty and unencumbered freedom will also make the list.
05-20-2013 06:46 PM
Breezygirl Her name was Melinda Green, thoughts and prayers for all involved

http://www.edmontonjournal.com/mobil...tml?id=8410218
05-20-2013 06:41 PM
ChopperCopper My only disagreement is that every says "accident" to excuse or diminish the responsibility of the driver.

I have said many times, an accident is something caused by nature, i.e., a falling tree or even a stuck throttle.

Let's try this: Preventable vs. Non-Preventable.

Was this crash preventable?

Well? What say you?
05-20-2013 06:28 PM
dragginwagon406 Not to muddy the waters too much...

Full throttle
05-20-2013 04:49 PM
dragginwagon406
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChopperCopper View Post
I am not convinced that this is a "freak accident". Driver error is a reasonable assumption. 40,000 people a year die in traffic crashes because of someone's driver error.

Very rarely do cars crash themselves.
I agree, very rarely do cars crash themselves. Occasionally, you will have a rear end lock up, a ball joint/tie rod fail, someone forget to put the outer axle shaft and nut back on after pulling the inner shaft and cause an accident but this is not the norm. Seems reasonable.

While I (or most anyone else) can understand someone accidentally running a red light, missing a stop sign or getting off the edge of road on a soft shoulder and causing an accident, I can't understand how you end up with a runaway Jeep while dismounting from a climbed tire - it defies logic.

No one could have expected to have a runaway Jeep headed their direction from a tire climb - it doesn't happen. No one could have thought to say, hey "watch out for runaway vehicles during the car show" any more than someone at a convenience store would say "watch out for old people parking that may drive through the front of our building".

Any root cause is possible right now but either way, it's not reasonable to expect a warning from any possible "freak accident".
05-20-2013 02:46 PM
JayDubya This is how: While intent is a required element for crimes other than strict-liability crimes, a drunk driver that kills another motorist is acting "recklessly"...acting in reckless and wanton behavior that shows disregard or indifference to the safety and value of human life or serious bodily injury. Another "buzz word" would be acting in "gross negligence" such that the culpable actions rise to the level of criminal liability. Recklessness/gross negligence satisfies the intent element for non strict liability crimes. That's just an fyi...not insinuating criminal liability in this tragic occurrence. An example of a strict liability crime would be running a stop sign or statutory rape.

There are undoubtedly liability issues here, joint and several, premises liability, failure to warn (depending on spectators' status as licensee, invitee, etc),which varies the duties owed to the spectators to be warned even about open and obvious dangers (think wet spot on grocery store floor) vs dangers that are or should be legally foreseeable, not to mention whether this jurisdiction follows comparative-negligence theory, contributory negligence theory, or a modified comparative negligence theory. Way too many unknown factors to argue about. :-)

J
05-20-2013 02:29 PM
DJL2 Since we seem to be splitting hairs, lets talk about lexicon - specifically, accident versus negligent. To me, the breakdown is simple:

Accident - the individual involved did not contribute to the act in a meaningful way and there was no reasonable expectation for them to identify the hazard and mitigate it. In this instance, I can see how a narrow interpretation from the perspective of the victim might be used to categorize this as an accident.

Negligent - the individual involved contributed meaningfully to the event through their actions and either caused or exacerbated the event/risk factors that directly or indirectly caused the observed result. In this instance, when the entire event is considered, it is clear that there is certainly the potential that the actions of one or more people contributed directly to the end result.

This all goes towards composite risk management - ID Hazards, Develop Controls/Make Decisions, Implement Controls, Assess - rinse and repeat. BeyondYourFrontDoor touched on this earlier - the question becomes, to what extent was this accomplished and how well. What hazards did the event assess? What controls did they implement? Lots of questions - and, of course, how the heck did this happen?

I'll be honest - I have not the first idea what happened here. If it were my Jeep, it'd be in 1st gear, 4-Lo. If "Maximum Overdrive" occured, my Jeep would roar forward...at approximately 4-5 mph. It'd look like that scene from Austin Powers with the steam roller. So, without definitive data, all I can really say is this appears to be poor risk management at a minimum...and possibly criminal negligence (because intent doesn't mean a thing once you've killed someone, though it may be a mitigating factor).
05-20-2013 02:24 PM
jkjeeper06
Quote:
Originally Posted by WatchThis! View Post

Smells like piss in here don't it. And the fact that I am the one saying this says something.
I smell it too
05-20-2013 02:19 PM
WatchThis!
Quote:
Originally Posted by kjeeper10 View Post
Omg this is still going on ?
Smells like piss in here don't it. And the fact that I am the one saying this says something.
05-20-2013 02:00 PM
kjeeper10 Omg this is still going on ?
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