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Topic Review (Newest First)
08-30-2013 12:58 PM
DFW6ER
Quote:
Originally Posted by vonulm View Post
No, I was thinking about Ardeca. It's a pure synthetic made in Belgium. Check the ardecausa web site. I've had it tested and it comes out with great reviews. There's a spec for Chrysler but most of my buds are running the Mercedes spec 5w30. It's awesome stuff. It doesn't seem to burn off or evaporate like so many other synthetics and everyone says the same thing to me......it makes their engines run much quieter. Weird. I've noticed it too. No more valve clatter.
Thanks. I'll check it out this weekend and see if anyone's run it in the Pentastar engine over on BITOG
08-30-2013 09:30 AM
bdrake i winterize everything from mowers to motorcycles seafoam works great on small engines and small carbs that that been sitting for a long time and wont start. my personal preference on my trucks is lucas products
08-30-2013 09:01 AM
BurlySoldier I've used SeaFoam several times in my 4.0 TJ. It was part of routine tune up maintenance which included plugs, wires etc. My jeep ran well afterwards but honestly it was most likely the plugs etc that made the difference.

However, the wife drives a 96 Infinity J30. It sat for several years and was driven only a couple times during that period. The engine I would say has tighter tolerances than the rugged 4.0L we all love. Wife had issues with rice mobile stalling at redlights. I poured sea foam in the tank, drove it 20 minutes on the highway and the stalling issue stopped and did not come back.

The arguments for and against it go both ways. My opinion is that ethanol gas is nasty shit. Older vehicles (like her J30)may be more problematic running it. Many people I talk to who are experienced hot rodders/car enthusiasts have nothing good to say about ethanol and what it does to engines.
08-29-2013 11:04 PM
vonulm No, I was thinking about Ardeca. It's a pure synthetic made in Belgium. Check the ardecausa web site. I've had it tested and it comes out with great reviews. There's a spec for Chrysler but most of my buds are running the Mercedes spec 5w30. It's awesome stuff. It doesn't seem to burn off or evaporate like so many other synthetics and everyone says the same thing to me......it makes their engines run much quieter. Weird. I've noticed it too. No more valve clatter.
08-29-2013 09:04 PM
DFW6ER You talking about German Castrol? Right now I'm running PP Ultra and am interested to see how it does on the UOA.
My avatar is actually Triumph the insult comic dog from the Conan O'Brian show.
08-29-2013 06:05 PM
vonulm
Quote:
Originally Posted by DFW6ER View Post
Ya, Blackstone was telling me my TBN values were getting a too low to prolong my OCIs any further, it wasn't an issue with high silicate or lead values. That was mostly using Mobil-1 oil. I've seen guys with the same engine go 12,000 miles using Shaffer Supreme 7000 and still have good results...but it's uber expensive and I'm not so sure the ROI is there with that stuff.

Heck, I can get you a true European spec full synthetic that blows Mobil1 away for $5.75 a liter. Amsoil is pretty much acknowledged as amongst the best but it's $8.50/Qt. plus shipping. I've run Amsoil since about 1978 and run it for 25K a bunch of times. I've always had it tested during and after and it fairs pretty well. The modern Euro stuff is awesome and a bunch cheaper. I'm guessin' that you have a Rottweiler based on your photo. Mine is about to be 6 yrs old.
08-28-2013 02:45 PM
DFW6ER Ya, Blackstone was telling me my TBN values were getting a too low to prolong my OCIs any further, it wasn't an issue with high silicate or lead values. That was mostly using Mobil-1 oil. I've seen guys with the same engine go 12,000 miles using Shaffer Supreme 7000 and still have good results...but it's uber expensive and I'm not so sure the ROI is there with that stuff.
08-28-2013 11:52 AM
vonulm I have my oil tested regularly. I have done so for almost 40 years. I have both a primary and a secondary bypass filter on my '02 Wrangler. I use high end synthetics (there IS a difference from brand to brand) and pull samples at regular intervals. I've worked with Blackstone Labs as well as several other oil analysis companies. With proper filtration the oil stays clean. What we should be concerned about other than filtration is the Total Base Number of the oil at any given interval. Using a higher quality synthetic with a higher base number to begin with is a good place to start. With good oil and better filtration, attaining longer drain intervals is not only acceptable but recommended by the oil analysis companies. Other than that the other consideration is chemical contaminants. If your engine or gearbox or gas turbine is running properly and there are no mechanical issues that would cause chemical contamination e.g. a bad head gasket leading to coolant intrusion or something similar your oil should be fine.
08-28-2013 08:29 AM
louczar My dad bought a 2005 Honda Aquatrax wave runner that is up on table rock lake in Missouri. We go up every summer for a couple of weeks. It is only used during the time we are there. My dad uses seafoam to winterize it. He drains all the gas, sprays the actual foam version into the designated tubes/ cylinders and gas tank. Puts the cover back on it and stores it under his carport. The beginning of each summer, he plugs the battery back in, puts in fresh gas and fires it up. smokes like hell for 20-30 secs, but works great and never had an issue
08-28-2013 08:17 AM
yoopone
Quote:
Originally Posted by ford-willy View Post
Don't agree that Sta-bil works at all & definitely not great like Seafoam does in small engines.

I live in a Ski Resort on over an acre. I have 3 generators, log splitter, push weed wacker, hand held weed wacker, lawn mower, snow blower, 2 chain saws. ---- I keep 20 gallons of fuel on hand and put in lots of Seafoam before filling the 4 containers at the gas pump. Since I started using Seafoam I have had NO repair bills for clogged fuel systems & carbs after fuel has set for long periods in all these tools. --- When I used Stabil years ago the exact same way, I could count on having $300 worth of repair work each year at the chain saw/small engine shop cleaning out various fuel system components.--- SEAFOAM Rocks, I love it.
I have had the exact same experience with Sea Foam at my Northern cabin. Golf carts, chain saw, weed wacker, outboard, carburated 89 YJ, log splitter, all have been terrific since winter treatments with Sea Foam. Much better that Stabil.
08-27-2013 05:42 PM
ford-willy [QUOTE=Jerry Bransford;
If you have a lawn more or similar engine where the gasoline regularly turns to varnish from sitting too long, use a more suitable product like Gumout or Sta-bil to clean things up.... they were specifically designed for such problems and cost 1/3 as much as Seafoam.[/QUOTE]

Don't agree that Sta-bil works at all & definitely not great like Seafoam does in small engines.

I live in a Ski Resort on over an acre. I have 3 generators, log splitter, push weed wacker, hand held weed wacker, lawn mower, snow blower, 2 chain saws. ---- I keep 20 gallons of fuel on hand and put in lots of Seafoam before filling the 4 containers at the gas pump. Since I started using Seafoam I have had NO repair bills for clogged fuel systems & carbs after fuel has set for long periods in all these tools. --- When I used Stabil years ago the exact same way, I could count on having $300 worth of repair work each year at the chain saw/small engine shop cleaning out various fuel system components.--- SEAFOAM Rocks, I love it.
08-27-2013 04:52 PM
Mithsan I haven't used it in my Jeep, but I had a chainsaw that would heat up and vapor lock. Adding a couple cap fulls of sea foam to the gas tank seemed to make a difference and it doesn't vapor lock.
08-27-2013 04:01 PM
DFW6ER I'm a fan of Seafoam, but there's no way in hell I'd run a 25,000 mile OCI. The best I've gotten in my cars was about 8,500 miles before the guys at Blackstone Labs were telling me to stop trying to extend the OCI. Also you'd have to wonder if the filter was doing any good or just in bypass mode at that many miles.
08-27-2013 03:27 PM
vonulm
SeaFoam De-coded

Hey bud,

I do this for a living. For almost forty years now. I work for an oil company that manufactures high end synthetics. In answer to your question, yes it's a good product. It's been around since the late 1940's. It was primarily used in marine applications hence the name. As I'm sure you're aware there's about a million of these fuel system additives on the market. Some work better than others. Price doesn't seem to be indicative of quality or performance.
As far as why it works I'll try to explain.
There are three basic ingredients in the stuff, IPA, Naptha, and Pale Oil.
The IPA distils at about 200-250 degrees, the Naptha at around 400, and the Pale Oil at about 800. For some reason, in combination, it distils at about 850 degrees.
It is an all petroleum based product with no added detergents therefore no added deposits from burned detergent.
It also has a "sheening" affect, meaning that it stays in suspension and on the cylinder walls and other engine components aiding in lubrication and constant prevention of any varnish build up from high temperatures and pressures, and fuel combustion. All gasoline brands despite their advertising leave a varnish behind as a result of combustion. The pale oil acts as a petroleum solvent to keep it constantly clean and lubricated.
The vast majority of similar products do little or nothing in comparison.
This is an old but very good product. It works well, it won't harm anything, it can be used as often as you like with no deleterious effects on the engine or the oil in the crank case.
I've run synthetic oil for as much as 25,000 miles between changes while using Seafoam in almost every tank fill up over the course of two years and had the oil analyzed upon draining. There were no unusual signs of oil deterioration.

I hope this helps to explain what's going on with this stuff.
Feel free to email me at vonulm@msn.com if you have any further questions.
Tim
08-27-2013 11:25 AM
dustymc YES!

As others have said, it's about bad gas. If you're driving back and forth to the mall, you can save some money by not buying shitty gas in the first place. If you're running around out in the boondocks, seafoam is the stuff to have. I carry 3 or 4 cans as part of my toolkit, and use it anytime the Jeep decides it would like to idle rough/slow/fast/otherwise wonky.

(This guy actually sold me great gas, but I was glad to have my seafoam along anyway!)

08-27-2013 11:21 AM
Fullback40 Ive used it in 3 different vehicles now. Works great to me. My Jeep was running sluggish when I got it. I ran a can through the tank and 1/3 in the oil, another 1/3 through the vacuums lines and then drove the piss out of it for a half hour. No problems since then.
08-27-2013 10:45 AM
1979WagoneerLTD
Quote:
Originally Posted by WideTire View Post
Does anybody use "Seafoam" fuel additive to clean the fuel system in the jeep ?
Is it okay to use it in the jeep fuel system ?

I use it in my car and my motorcycle and its great.

Thanks in advance.
If the fuel delivery, supply, and base engine are in good condition not much is likely to change. SeaFoam, Berryman B12, Casite, acetone/xylene, nail polish remover, are solvents.

It used to be known as the "million dollar miracle" because it was priced higher than Casite. GM Top Engine cleaner is another similar product, and was used for many years to correct "depressed vacuum syndrome" on early speed density fuel injected engines.

I forgot to mention it emulsifies water in fuel. This is not necessarily a good thing, especially in a diesel. Even on small engines that have varnished, there is no substitute for draining the bad fuel out of the tank, lines, carb. Replace filters and rebuild carb or replace other fuel system components if they won't clean up.

I've used solvents as an intake enema to correct depressed vacuum. But the last time that was on a 91 Caprice 305 the old lady never got above 45. It was a coked-up mess.
08-27-2013 10:42 AM
louczar I have used Sea foam (not the liquid, the actual foam spray) in the past in my ZX9R that sat for a year when I hurt my back and had surgery. It cleaned everything out nice and the bike ran great.

I have some friends who are not well educated with taking care of their lawn mowers / weed eaters and let them sit for long periods of time with old gas. I have used Sea foam to fill the carbs and in the cylinder. Let them sit for a couple of hours and then they fire right up. Then the discussion about stabil and why they need to use it so they dont have to bring me their non running mowers and such.

I dont pour it in my gas tank or crank case. I have helped my dad back in the day use kerosine If there is too much sludge in the engine from lack of oil changes. These were older vehicles decades ago. The amount of sludge that would come out when we drained the oil was crazy after doing this. It never caused problems if done right.
08-27-2013 10:14 AM
JCharlet I haven't used Seafoam myself, but reading the stories about pulling it into the intake manifold / carbs / fuel injectors, and the subsequent amount of smoke produced upon startup sure sounded familiar.

For quite a few years I owned a first gen RX-7. With the rotary engine it was quite common for there to be gum and buildup in the apex seals, which then wouldn't seal against the rotor housing, causing poor compression and therefore rough running.

For those of you not familiar with rotary engines, the apex seal basically performs the same function as piston rings.

A VERY common fix for this was to put no more than a capful (if even that much) of ATF into each barrel of the 4 Barrel Nikki carb. Then disconnect the ignition coil, and turn it over to coat the rotors (and therefore the seals) good with the ATF.

Let that sit 24-48 hours. Then, alert the neighbors (unless you want the FD at your place), fire her up, then proceed to get completely enveloped in a sea of white smoke.

Once done I could definitely tell a difference in power and smoothness.

While I'm not attempting to turn this into a thread on rotaries, I guess my point is that if ATF is such a common fix for gum and varnish, it may be possible that Seafoam is a glorified solution that the ATF can handle just fine and much more cheaply.

I really have no idea for sure, but just thought I'd share from my perspective as a former rotary engine owner.

Josh
'99 TJ
08-27-2013 10:12 AM
Tomssw With todays garbage gasoline its a must at my house especially in small engines.
08-02-2013 10:41 PM
tbensor
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ljcrawler05 View Post

So you are supposed to change the oil after putting it in the crankcase? Ive gathered that from seeing where others have chamged it immediately
Yes. After a few hundred miles I believe
08-02-2013 12:13 PM
ninjaturtle0
Quote:
Originally Posted by DFW6ER View Post
Seafoam is considerably thinner than motor oil. if you add it to the crank case, don't exceed the amount recommended on the bottle (1/3 can IIRC). Try to avoid high RPM driving and change the oil about 50-100 miles afterwards. This will decrease the chances of damage from too thin an oil viscosity. I've read of a couple of folks who spun bearings on another auto forum I belong to. The common denominator was they both had Seafoam in the cranks, had both exceeded the recommended amounts in the CC, and had driven for hundreds of miles. In fact, one actually had his car on a dyno when it threw a CEL and started running like poo.
X2

change after 50 to 100 miles of driving.
08-02-2013 11:56 AM
tj steve I also bought an old cbr 600 one time that would not run good. It stumbled on take off and would not rev quickly like it should. I am sure it sat and the gas turned bad in it. Anyhow I mixed some seafoam with the gas and ran a tank through it. Sure enough it smoothed out the carb problems. I will add I do not think the seafoam would have helped if the carbs were to clogged up. Once it gets so bad the only thing to do is take them apart and clean them.
08-02-2013 11:40 AM
DFW6ER
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ljcrawler05 View Post
So you are supposed to change the oil after putting it in the crankcase? Ive gathered that from seeing where others have chamged it immediately
Seafoam is considerably thinner than motor oil. if you add it to the crank case, don't exceed the amount recommended on the bottle (1/3 can IIRC). Try to avoid high RPM driving and change the oil about 50-100 miles afterwards. This will decrease the chances of damage from too thin an oil viscosity. I've read of a couple of folks who spun bearings on another auto forum I belong to. The common denominator was they both had Seafoam in the cranks, had both exceeded the recommended amounts in the CC, and had driven for hundreds of miles. In fact, one actually had his car on a dyno when it threw a CEL and started running like poo.
08-02-2013 11:01 AM
Ljcrawler05
Quote:
Originally Posted by ninjaturtle0 View Post
I had a tick my engine before, put some seafoam in the crank, then changed the oil and put some in my gas tank

no more ticks
So you are supposed to change the oil after putting it in the crankcase? Ive gathered that from seeing where others have chamged it immediately
08-02-2013 10:44 AM
ninjaturtle0 I had a tick my engine before, put some seafoam in the crank, then changed the oil and put some in my gas tank

no more ticks
08-02-2013 05:57 AM
ChaddG I forgot to mention, I have poured a can of sea foam in my gas tank too. didn't harm anything, actually cleaned out the intake a bit. some smoke blew out the back and all was fine. Didn't trip any codes, I am going to take a can and suck some right into the intake manifold via a vacuum line next.
I did that with my volvo. <make sure you do it in an area that nobody will complain about the smoke> My volvo smoked so much it was embarrasing!

08-02-2013 12:36 AM
WideTire Well I use seafoam in my motorcycle and I do see that the engine idling smoothens out.

From all the above discussions looks like the tj will take it. Lets see how it goes.
08-01-2013 07:07 AM
t84a I use Seafoam in everything: cars, motorcycles, lawnmowers, trimmers, blowers. I swear by it.
08-01-2013 06:31 AM
ChaddG Now, I saw this video where a guy had 2 of the exact same year make and model trucks.
One truck he ran regular unleaded through.
The other truck, he ran straight corn gas through.th
Neither truck was a flex fuel vehicle.
The truck that ran the straight gas, was carboned, gunked and cruddy.
the truck that ran the corn gas, All the parts looked new.
Each truck had 200,000 miles on them.
I wish I could find the video for all the non believers.
I was shocked.
I say, "Give me a gasoline without any additives"
"Give me a fuel for my vehicle that doesn't cost 4.00/Gal." or more...
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