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Topic Review (Newest First)
09-03-2009 07:58 PM
buckshot500
Quote:
Originally Posted by flattietj View Post
my answer to that is........when a weld cracks and he starts trying to build pressure and cant......oh crap it was that huge rock i just tried to climb and only rammed my bumper into.......if he/she is a competent/confident welder then its fine.......i just have never been a fan of the bumper air tanks....i have seen them crack before......they are just not worth it when you have plenty of space elswhere.......like i said i have a 2.5 gallont tank that fits under my hood......jeeps leave alot of room
I have welded many schedule 120 pipe joints for a hydraulic system that reaches pressures up to 4000 psi, with two passes of E-7018. One in & one over.

Those joints were holding for more than ten years last time I saw them.

My bumper welds were laid in the same way, & I'm not too worried about them failing.

I am however worried that in the event of a rear end collision, the square tube's seam weld might split if it's pressurized. This is why I drain it before hitting the road.

On the trail, I can't imagine that scuffing it on some rocks would cause that to happen, but I might just drain it for rock crawling as well. It only takes a minute or two to drain it from 130 psi.

I thought about mounting it up underneath the bed, but decided to kill two birds with one stone. I was growing tired of the bumperettes.
09-03-2009 06:19 AM
morphious yeah i suppose i see what u mean
09-02-2009 11:52 PM
flattietj
Quote:
Originally Posted by morphious View Post
yeah but buckshot even said he only uses it when he needs it and never runs around with it under pressure
my answer to that is........when a weld cracks and he starts trying to build pressure and cant......oh crap it was that huge rock i just tried to climb and only rammed my bumper into.......if he/she is a competent/confident welder then its fine.......i just have never been a fan of the bumper air tanks....i have seen them crack before......they are just not worth it when you have plenty of space elswhere.......like i said i have a 2.5 gallont tank that fits under my hood......jeeps leave alot of room
09-02-2009 11:37 PM
morphious yeah but buckshot even said he only uses it when he needs it and never runs around with it under pressure
09-02-2009 11:11 PM
flattietj i put a 2 gallon air tank under my hood and run air tools as long as i want off of just my a/c compressor.....u oughta be able to fill a 1 gallon tank and that york will keep up....ther is plenty of space on that jeep to put a tank....under the hood.....in the trunk...up inside the frame.......just think about how many parts you are planning on breaking and then decide on how much volume u need.....im not a big fan of the bumper air tanks b/c mine regularly get beat on rocks and i would hate to see waht happened if it was still under pressure.
09-01-2009 09:16 PM
buckshot500 Brad Kilby's site has a decoder for the York tag. IIRC you would want the 210 model.
It puts out the most volume due to it's greater displacement. The other ones will work well too though.

You will be pleased with it once it's done, I use mine all the time. Nice to fill up tires for six bicycles, without loosing the use of my arms for three days!
09-01-2009 06:39 PM
ygohome I just bought a york compressor today on my lunch break for $35. I'm not sure which model number it is though. It came with the clutch/pulley but its for the wrong belt (vbelt). I need to buy a replacement clutch/pulley that will work on my serpentine belt with 6 grooves. The only place I've seen those for sale on on kilby's website for $145. Anyway, I'm looking forward to this little project. I'm going to see if my friend can make a bracket. I'll still have to buy fittings and all the other stuff though.

I'll be using a becool radiator with electrical fan for cooling so I should be okay I think.
07-25-2009 11:07 AM
Jerry Bransford I just want to add one comment about the size of air fittings recommended for a high-volume compressor like the York F210. Stick with 3/8" fittings throughout and you'll be able to take advantage of its high CFM capacity, using 1/4" fittings just bottlenecks its full potential. That's how I made my York OBA system nine years ago and I'm glad I decided to use the bigger fittings and hoses throughout.
07-22-2009 05:54 PM
buckshot500
Quote:
Originally Posted by morphious View Post
yeah but its still going to get hot peaty quick but not so fast that its not going to get the job done u just have to keep it in the back of ur mind to keep an eye on it
This^^^^^^

Yes a Hayden or even cheaper ford Taurus E fan will help. The taurus has a two speed feature.

I grabbed a Sable fan last time I was at the junkyard, but it's too deep & wont fit between the water pump & radiator, so i may try to get the actual Taurus fan.
07-22-2009 09:21 AM
morphious yeah but its still going to get hot peaty quick but not so fast that its not going to get the job done u just have to keep it in the back of ur mind to keep an eye on it
07-21-2009 03:19 PM
RednekYJ
Quote:
Originally Posted by YjMopower View Post
ohhhhh o kay iam guessing those hayden electrical fans wont be able to help you out here?
E-fans would help you. Anything that takes drag off the motor will help.
07-21-2009 12:54 PM
YjMopower ohhhhh o kay iam guessing those hayden electrical fans wont be able to help you out here?
07-20-2009 09:44 PM
buckshot500
Quote:
Originally Posted by YjMopower View Post
how would i adjust my idle so it could stay on at that rpm its fuel injected 4.0 .
Quote:
Originally Posted by RednekYJ View Post
With a hand throttle.
This^^^^^^^^^^^

Quote:
Originally Posted by YjMopower View Post
know the bigger the tank the higher the rpm has to be?
No, the tank is for storage of air volume. You can run at a lower rpm with a tank, & the compressor will refill as needed. If the tank drains out too fast, then increase the rpm's.

With no tank, you run it at whatever rpm the tool requires to function at peak capacity.

In other words, if you have an impact gun that will loosen your lugs at it's #4 setting & it's not loosening them you need to increase engine rpm's so the York can "keep up".

Quote:
Originally Posted by YjMopower View Post
wow 1500 seems like a lot.
You'll want to keep an eye on the temp gauge, but I run mine higher than that sometimes when welding. It'll warm you engine up quickly though so don't run it too long like that. I'd say 10-15 minutes & let it cool down a while.
07-20-2009 08:45 PM
RednekYJ
Quote:
Originally Posted by YjMopower View Post
wow 1500 seems like a lot, how would i adjust my idle so it could stay on at that rpm its fuel injected 4.0 .know the bigger the tank the higher the rpm has to be?
With a hand throttle.
07-19-2009 09:54 PM
YjMopower wow 1500 seems like a lot, how would i adjust my idle so it could stay on at that rpm its fuel injected 4.0 .know the bigger the tank the higher the rpm has to be?
07-19-2009 09:41 PM
buckshot500 catsknr all of my airtools have 1/4" airline fittings, & run just fine with them. The York can be throttled up to run my bluepoint 1/2" impact gun with no airtank. It'll do it at 1600 or 1700 engine RPM's.
The only reason I could think to use more airflow is to re-seat a tire bead.

I ended up welding 1/4" bungs into my bumper tank, & haven't tried re-seating a bead yet.

I will say that I have tried re-seating a bead with a ratchet strap around the circumference of the tire. It works like a charm!

I appreciate your advice & concern, but my setup is working pretty good like it is.

You setup looks pretty sweet, with all that yellow hose. I have a very limited budget, & went with mostly stuff I already had. That's not to say & wouldn't spend the $$$ if it made a huge difference though.
07-19-2009 09:33 PM
catsknr
Quote:
Originally Posted by YjMopower View Post
wow thats just amazing now my question is do you eventually run out of air even if you have a big tank?like does the compressor acuatlly make air or just compress it. is there anyway you can get a constant air so you dont run out of air nomatter how many times you use it?
My pressure switch shuts the compressor off when it reaches 145 psi and turns it on at 95 psi, so that means the compressor is cycling on and off to keep my 2.5 gal. tank full. It will put out at least 150 psi at 8+ cfm, depending on the speed of the engine. I run mine around 1500 rpm and my estimate of cfm is probably around 9cfm.
07-19-2009 08:19 PM
YjMopower wow thats just amazing now my question is do you eventually run out of air even if you have a big tank?like does the compressor acuatlly make air or just compress it. is there anyway you can get a constant air so you dont run out of air nomatter how many times you use it?
07-19-2009 11:30 AM
catsknr
Quote:
Originally Posted by buckshot500 View Post
That's where this thing comes into play. It can fill all four tires from flat in about 8-10 minutes.
:
My OBA can fill a 35" from flat to 30lbs in under a minute, but, I am running a 210 at 1200-1500 rpm and I am also running a 1/2" line off the compressor, to my manifold and from there it goes 3/8 the rest of the way.
Buckshot, looking at your pics, might I suggest you go to 1/2 inch line from your compressor to your tanks in order to get the full output of it, as the 1/4" out is only going to choke it down and when you do install a tank, your air tools will still run out of air faster than you would like and take twice as long to refill the tank.
As for using copper for cooling the air, that does work but I use a hydrolic line rated for 500psi ( I know, overkill) but it is also oil resistant, and run it to the other side of the engine bay. ( see pics) As for using an A/C condensor, that works good, except out here in the 100-120 degree heat, and you are sitting still, it blocks more airflow to the engine, and in my opinion, it will heat the airflow even more to the radiator.
Edit: The only Kilby parts I used are the bracket, and the fittings on the compressor. ( could of fabbed a bracket but would of taken to long for trial and error, and the fittings just give it a "professional" look.)
07-16-2009 06:41 PM
buckshot500 http://www.wranglerforum.com/showpos...9&postcount=15
05-25-2009 09:00 PM
buckshot500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lancem View Post
Sorry but I think there's a lot of sense going bigger


Just wanted you to see where I'm coming from, I want to install mine just once and have the full capability that is possible from the system.
I'll check those links, when I have some time. I see what your getting at though.

I was thinking of putting a 3/4" air hose on the rear tank, to help seat tire beads.
The stored air would flow to the tire faster.

So now, I will connect both tanks with 1/2" lines as well as a 1/2" line to the rear air chuck. I think they will be OK with 1/4" supply, as the amount stored between them should be enough for my needs. If not, I can turn up the hand throttle a little more.

The 1/4" copper line, & it's flare nut fittings were cheap enough.

Thanks for the advice! I have many years of experience with this stuff, but am too old to remember it all at once. I appreciate the memory jog.
05-25-2009 12:08 PM
Lancem
Quote:
Originally Posted by buckshot500 View Post
I'm using 1/4" everywhere else, so no sense in going bigger to plumb the tanks.
Sorry but I think there's a lot of sense going bigger

"Air pressure loss in standard power tool hoses"
http://www.itwfinishing.com.mx/pdf/TIPS.pdf

If you're planning to really use your 1/2" air impact you're wanting at least 8 CFM at 90 psi to let it really work, figuring about 10' of tank plumbing or more, then 10-20' of hose or more and you could be loosing 30psi by time you fire up the tool. Going to 1/2" id plastic and you have no loss for the most part. Just something to think about if you want your OBA to really rock. The second link is about spray guns but the info works for any air tool, quick disconnects can cost allot for their convince and their example lets you see how the losses add up.

Just wanted you to see where I'm coming from, I want to install mine just once and have the full capability that is possible from the system.
05-25-2009 11:22 AM
dooder another cool thread. better than hoodscoops.
05-25-2009 09:55 AM
buckshot500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lancem View Post
No problem, I was just thinking of the vibration that coil in the engine compartment is going to see anytime the engine is running, it will last a while, but you know it will break when you can least afford it too. Something I was thinking about for my OBA design as far as cooling out of the compressor is using an air condishioning evaporator coil from a car, they are fairly compact and should handle the pressure no problem.

I would either go with plastic or steel back to the tank, I would think either one would be cheaper and longer lasting than copper. Go with the largest size you can so that you don't impead your flow rate for using the tools, they live on CFM. I don't know if you can get steel tubing larger than 3/8" OD, plastic is easy to get in 1/2" ID, check Mcmaster. com.
I'm using 1/4" everywhere else, so no sense in going bigger to plumb the tanks.

I have a couple of those plastic tube connectors, where you shove the end in the fitting, & it automatically locks into place. If I can just remember where I put 'em!
05-25-2009 09:00 AM
Lancem No problem, I was just thinking of the vibration that coil in the engine compartment is going to see anytime the engine is running, it will last a while, but you know it will break when you can least afford it too. Something I was thinking about for my OBA design as far as cooling out of the compressor is using an air condishioning evaporator coil from a car, they are fairly compact and should handle the pressure no problem.

I would either go with plastic or steel back to the tank, I would think either one would be cheaper and longer lasting than copper. Go with the largest size you can so that you don't impead your flow rate for using the tools, they live on CFM. I don't know if you can get steel tubing larger than 3/8" OD, plastic is easy to get in 1/2" ID, check Mcmaster. com.
05-25-2009 08:05 AM
buckshot500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lancem View Post
Get rid of the copper tubing and go to steel, the copper will work harden from vibration and crack, better yet go to a short length of hydralic hose, 3500 psi burst strenght, flexable and inexpencive, available at TSC in the tractor section.
The idea with the copper, is that it allows the air to cool a bit after exiting the compressor.

If it does let go, I'll switch to steel.

I was gonna run a copper line to the rear tank, when I get it built.

I think I'll go with your suggestion for that, now that you mention "work hardening". I knew about this phenomenon, but didn't think about the effects of pressure/no-pressure cycling. It will surely fail at some point, though prolly not real soon.

I bet if I replaced the copper once a year, it would be OK.

Thanks for the heads-up!
05-25-2009 07:41 AM
Lancem Get rid of the copper tubing and go to steel, the copper will work harden from vibration and crack, better yet go to a short length of hydralic hose, 3500 psi burst strenght, flexable and inexpencive, available at TSC in the tractor section.
05-24-2009 06:27 AM
buckshot500
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikes05unlimited View Post
how much do you think that cost you to build?
Well that's gonna be a little more than I thought, because I ended up buying a spare York with the brackets.

I also bought another steering pump to get the dual pulley for my on-board welder.

Another thing to consider, is I still haven't acquired any air storage tanks & plan to have two. One from a big truck's air brake system, & a rectangular tube rear bumper (I'll build) will be the other.

The York I'm using, was the first one I got from the junkyard, off a Mercedes-Benz. It was $30.00

The other one, with extra steering box & all the brackets from a 1981 Cherokee was $75.00 + $40.00 shipping.

150 psi. safety valve was $20.00.

Although I already had a Square-D adjustable pressure switch, they cost about$50.00.

New gauge was $5.00

Both copper lines, the 5' one pictured, & the 10' one I bought for the rear tank (s) along with their flare nut fittings were about $30.00

Tee's, elbows, nipples, bushings, & couplings prolly ad up to another $30.00

New belt $10.00 I already had a check valve, but they cost about$20.00.

All the figures I listed add up to $260.00. This was my cost (so far), less the stuff I already had.
Yours may be more or less.

Either way, it's way less than the system you can buy that is already complete. That's a $1000.00 plus deal.

If you have the coin, & just hate walking around junkyards with a heavy toolbox, or figuring things out yourself then Brad Kilby offers such a kit.

It's a great kit, & works just as good, if not better (100% new components) than mine.

::Kilby Enterprises::

Good luck, you wont be disappointed when you have it finished!
05-23-2009 10:47 PM
mikes05unlimited how much do you think that cost you to build?
05-23-2009 08:16 PM
buckshot500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Levinoss View Post
I'm not That noobish but I get your point.


Going to have a garage under your hood I like it.
I drove a tow truck, back in the mid 1980's. My favorite calls were recoveries.

Drunk folks, tend to drive their vehicles into the strangest places!

My heep is well on it's way, to becoming an excellent recovery vehicle!

If I can winch it there, I can get you back in action real quick!

I foresee cases of free beer in my future!!!
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