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Topic Review (Newest First)
12-18-2013 10:36 AM
THE COYOTE I have a strong suspicion that there are other readers out there
12-18-2013 10:21 AM
sparky I think Bob's got this figured out now, he should have three years under his belt.
12-18-2013 08:31 AM
THE COYOTE Oh and check out land's end online store, i just picked up a $150 5-15F waterproof and windproof jacket for $32
12-18-2013 08:29 AM
THE COYOTE I did not read replies so i apologize for any repeats:

Smartwool
Quick dry underwear (ex oficio)
Fleece or wool sweater
Down jacket (some are treated with water resistant chemicals)
Windbreaker
Wool beanie
Neck buff
Gloves (i usually get by with snowboard glove liners but i also own fleece lined wool mittens for when temps get below 32F)

If you get really cold, heat up some water and put it in a tightly closing water bottle. Put this between your base layer and your fleece or wool sweater and youll be nice and toasty

-The Coyote
12-18-2013 08:20 AM
RoadGlide
Quote:
Originally Posted by MattieTaylor View Post
Leather jacket is the best option for winter. It gives more warmth than any of the fabric.
...um...no...

...and i own about 6 cows worth of leather...

...great for road rash...not much else...
11-10-2010 03:51 PM
Schwheelz
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobjenkins
Still alot of good advice in here! As I said im just getting into snow camping eventually Ill be backpacking but not for atleast until next year hehe/ the magic there is you can bring whatever the jeep can carry !
Ya know now that i see where your coming from on this issue and well, your not going to in general be dealing with issues of "if i forget my glove i WILL lose my hand" just stick with the cheap things, i am very experianced with snow, ice, mountaineering, as well as extreme and backcountry skiing.

In all honesty, for what your doing just buy long underwear bring a couple pairs of jeans something plastic that you can sit on, a heavy fleece and a waterproof jacket, you wanna keep your torso warm and in the temperatures your gonna be in it doesnt matter if you get a LITTLE wet, also bring hand warmers just to put in your boot.. That'll help keep your feet from getting frostbite, stay cheap, just wear jeans in that situation,, i wouldnt risk my very expensive equipment that is lighter than a bloody feather when the cars two miles away and theres a tent with a warm sleeping bag even closer plus your NEW TO THIS use trial and error and ease into the sport with progression, i started as a little cub scout at a campfire in the summer, now i do winter ascents up to 14,000 ft in blizzard conditions, the most important part is knowing when to turn around dont try something your uncomfortable with, trust your instinct and start basic as you find desires in your equipment cache add to it, dont just copy everyone else and listen to opinions blindly
11-10-2010 12:01 PM
Mr. Sinister Old Navy makes some really warm and inexpensive winter jackets. I have a black wool coat from them with a hood and a zip up front with snaps to keep the wind out. I have yet to feel a cold that gets through it.
11-09-2010 09:50 PM
bobjenkins Still alot of good advice in here! As I said im just getting into snow camping eventually Ill be backpacking but not for atleast until next year hehe/ the magic there is you can bring whatever the jeep can carry !
11-09-2010 09:29 PM
s3nt3nc3d
Quote:
Originally Posted by jdhallissey View Post
Nobody asked him what he is going to be doing. This is a major let down since how do you give a solution to a problem you don't know.

Layers works the best- From working in the cold just about every night in the IL winters and also days. Then golfing in cold weather, I need to know what you plan on doing in the cold. Like walking from your car to the grocery store, or being outside in it for hours.
"Looking for low activity gear like sitting around in a camp or some light hiking."

And in another post, he asked more about winter camping...so sounds like just light activity camping during the winter with snow on the ground. No extreme survival needs...just comfort needs so he isn't shaking all night or wimping out and sleeping in the car. lol

I also recommend Carhartt jackets...I actually just went out and blew $80 on a new one last week. My old one I used to wear four-wheeling during the winter...wore it the night I went four-wheeling when it was below 0*F and I ended up jumping into water nearly neck deep to help my buddy pull his quad out of the pool when it fell through the ice. My feet felt like they were going to fall off by the time we got back to the barns, but I stayed warm in my coat...although I had to literally crawl out of it. It was a frozen shell that sat upright perfectly with nobody inside of it.

I'm hoping to do some winter camping this year as well...never done it before, but hope to learn something from it all.
11-09-2010 08:53 PM
adkjoe
Quote:
Originally Posted by Schwheelz View Post
Also if your backpacking, cotton is heavy and i always try to follow the boyscout model on that issue, BE PREPARED, and well... Cotton is very unprepared (if not simply foolish) in a backcountry situation

Absolutely agree, cotton is heavy and terrible for a packing trip but for out at deer camp or just hanging by a bonfire it's warm as hell.
11-09-2010 08:50 PM
jdhallissey Nobody asked him what he is going to be doing. This is a major let down since how do you give a solution to a problem you don't know.

Layers works the best- From working in the cold just about every night in the IL winters and also days. Then golfing in cold weather, I need to know what you plan on doing in the cold. Like walking from your car to the grocery store, or being outside in it for hours.
11-09-2010 08:39 PM
1SAS One more "tid bit"... I am glad someone brought up the "old school" technology. Wool and down, they work great but you have to prepare to wear down. Meaning you need to keep it dry or it is of no use whatsoever.

The point I would like to make is the issue of "naturals" vs. "synthetics." I already stated my preference so I will not repeat. BUT DO NOT MIX AND MATCH between both groups. The only exception being the outer, waterproof layer. You can use GORETEX with both groups. The problem is if you use COTTON, you will sweat in it and the cotton will retain the water. This will further drop your body temperature and suck it out like a sponge. At some point, you will be constantly cold and will not be able to stop shivering.

WOOL is great in most conditions. It is the old standby and it works, but you have to layer properly underneath it. SYNTHETICS are the best because of how they work. If you put military "poly" long underwear next to your naked body (leave the cotton underwear at home) and put on polar fleece over than, and then your GORETEX/THINSULATE parka on top of that, you should be good to go in almost any weather that is actually habitable by humans. The drawback is the costs but you have to remember, these synthetics are engineered materials designed to be the best cold/wet weather gear in the world. Expense was not spared in creating them. They just had to work...and they do.

It was nice hearing somebody talking about wool. I haven't heard that in a long time, and it brought back a lot of memories. Why? Because it worked back then but it didn't work as well as synthetics.

Remember: Don't wear cotton or anything like cotton in cold weather where survival matters. If you are trapped, ditch it and drive on. That means no underwear, bras, T-shirts, etc. Also, don't mix "naturals" with "synthetics" EXCEPT Goretex. Goretex allows perspiration and moisture that your body produces to literally flow outside of the jacket. You know even an inexpensive Goretex rain coat ($ 80) will do wonders and increase your survival ability tremendously over a Carhatt jacket.

Take care,
11-09-2010 08:11 PM
Schwheelz
Quote:
Originally Posted by adkjoe

If your going to be active cotton is not a good choice, you never want to let yourself sweat in the cold. Cotton is a great choice for sitting around in the cold in a dry place like I said in my previous posts. Cotton is a great insulator just not when you sweat or are going to get wet.
Also if your backpacking, cotton is heavy and i always try to follow the boyscout model on that issue, BE PREPARED, and well... Cotton is very unprepared (if not simply foolish) in a backcountry situation
11-09-2010 02:07 PM
kg4kpg What I learned from my guides on my back-country trip to the Rockies last winter was have a base layer, insulating layer and shell. Absolutely no cotton. I was amazed when skiing at 11000 ft and was sweating and using their clothing advice I never got cold...well, it was as cold as a witches....you get the idea.
11-09-2010 01:55 PM
adkjoe
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobjenkins View Post
Yeah Im definately going to stay away from cotton. in the past ive thrown on 6 cotton layers to go play in the snow and the day always ends badly.

what im tihnking now is a base layer of under armour or cheap knock off, some kind of fleece sweater and an insulated jacket with outer rain shell
If your going to be active cotton is not a good choice, you never want to let yourself sweat in the cold. Cotton is a great choice for sitting around in the cold in a dry place like I said in my previous posts. Cotton is a great insulator just not when you sweat or are going to get wet.
11-09-2010 01:32 PM
bobjenkins
Quote:
Originally Posted by jeepjones View Post
Goretex is great if your moving around, if your just sitting in camp you'll end up being cold. Of all the years I've worked & played outside all winter I have a little advice. Base layers are very important & should be worn as close to your skin as possible (UnderArmour, lightweight fleece,polypropylene,polyester) never wear anything made of COTTON. Cotton absorbs and holds moisture which is your enemy in the cold, even socks. I've had friends get hypothermia while sitting around a campfire in the winter because they wore cotton layers. Even with all the new fancy fabrics and technology I have found that WOOL and DOWN are far superior cold weather materials. Wool will insulate even when it's soaking wet and Down just can't be beat for cold weather insulation. As for Carhart, it also has it's place, I've worn Carhart Arctic insulated bib pants for each of my 8yrs working outdoors in as low as -50 celsius, and as long as you have your base layers you should be good to go. Just remember they have a cotton canvas outer material that will get wet and stay wet/frozen but the inner layers are polyester so like wool it will retain it's insulating properties, the same goes for their jackets, the only drawback to Carhart is the weight and bulkiness of their products which are designed for work. Canadian Army Surplus has some of the Best ARCTIC survival gear in the world (I would hope so), so if you have access to it you can't better for your buck. So stay away from cotton, fleece and most synthetic fabric's are your friends, wool is very warm even when wet and a water repellant jacket insulated with down is your warmest and best insulator (it's what the wear when they climb MT Everest). Sorry for the long post but it could save your life.
Yeah Im definately going to stay away from cotton. in the past ive thrown on 6 cotton layers to go play in the snow and the day always ends badly.

what im tihnking now is a base layer of under armour or cheap knock off, some kind of fleece sweater and an insulated jacket with outer rain shell
11-09-2010 01:27 PM
bobjenkins lots of good info in here! esp the tent foot print! I had a cheapo tent I used and woke up in 3 inches of water one time lol. Next day I bought a tarp and put it under the tent. Next night I woke up in water still! Dont forget to cut the tarp a tad smaller then your tent base or water will pool on it.

I bought a 4 season tent and I love it one of the bst things Ive ever bought. Its heavy as hell at 8 lbs but I dont mind because I dont hike hehe. cant wait to test it in the snow!

How you guys camping in snow deal with fires? I figure Ill use my shovel to shovel a pit then bring some dry wood with me. any quick tips┐
11-09-2010 01:27 PM
jeepjones Goretex is great if your moving around, if your just sitting in camp you'll end up being cold. Of all the years I've worked & played outside all winter I have a little advice. Base layers are very important & should be worn as close to your skin as possible (UnderArmour, lightweight fleece,polypropylene,polyester) never wear anything made of COTTON. Cotton absorbs and holds moisture which is your enemy in the cold, even socks. I've had friends get hypothermia while sitting around a campfire in the winter because they wore cotton layers. Even with all the new fancy fabrics and technology I have found that WOOL and DOWN are far superior cold weather materials. Wool will insulate even when it's soaking wet and Down just can't be beat for cold weather insulation. As for Carhart, it also has it's place, I've worn Carhart Arctic insulated bib pants for each of my 8yrs working outdoors in as low as -50 celsius, and as long as you have your base layers you should be good to go. Just remember they have a cotton canvas outer material that will get wet and stay wet/frozen but the inner layers are polyester so like wool it will retain it's insulating properties, the same goes for their jackets, the only drawback to Carhart is the weight and bulkiness of their products which are designed for work. Canadian Army Surplus has some of the Best ARCTIC survival gear in the world (I would hope so), so if you have access to it you can't better for your buck. So stay away from cotton, fleece and most synthetic fabric's are your friends, wool is very warm even when wet and a water repellant jacket insulated with down is your warmest and best insulator (it's what the wear when they climb MT Everest). Sorry for the long post but it could save your life.
11-09-2010 12:53 PM
Peepers Cabelas, carhartt, LL bean, duluth trading company. these are all good companies to look into.
11-09-2010 12:47 PM
adkjoe I do a lot of long distance hiking and just like everything else it depends what your doing and where your going, I'm anal about every ounce I pack. The last trip I took was 180 mile hike over 11 days and my pack was around 17 pounds +/- a pound While cotton/down is warmer than synthetic materials it's useless when it gets wet unlike synthetic/fleece material. In a place like AZ I would stay with a good down jacket and some cotton layers. Up here I use a down sleeping bag but I have to be very careful to keep it dry in wet new England because it looses all insulating properties when it's wet. Like I said above it's all about creating dead air space between layer for your body to heat up, you can buy a 100$ jacket and be just as warm as you would have with a $500 jacket if you dress properly.
11-09-2010 12:39 PM
schnutzy
Quote:
Originally Posted by Schwheelz View Post
I have one of those ground fly's for my big agnes 2person, im pretty sure its 2lb 8 ounces overall
i just use a 6x8 tarp for my two person, and it may be a couple ounces heavier then that. the only time i like those over a normal tarp is when im hammock camping. cause those special ground flys let a bit more light through them. for some reason i prefer that to cover my hammock over a normal, opaque tarp.
11-09-2010 12:37 PM
adkjoe If your not getting wet layer cotton and wool. It's all about dead air space man. The more pockets of air you create in the clothes you layer the warmer your body stays. You don't want things that are to tight and you don't want to loose either because then you have more space to heat. as long as you layer properly you can stay warm enough with a sweatshirt.

Trust me I know cold up here Single digits and below zero are pretty normal from late December to February in the mountains here. I've got a Marmot "never summer" sleeping bag that's rated to -20 degrees and I still layer in that, that's how cold it gets sometimes but I love it. I camp all winter long.
11-09-2010 12:36 PM
Schwheelz
Quote:
Originally Posted by schnutzy

i like the synthetic socks over the wool, i got mine cheaper then my wool socks, and they work just as well, and sty a little more dry when playing outside.

with the tarp, a lot of the times you dont even need to cut it up, just get one that is the same size as your tent, and having the little holes at the ends makes it nice cause you can stake it down with your tent.there are specialty ground flys you can get for tents, but those normally are not worth it unless you are really trying to cut weight down. but thats at the extreme level that very few people actually need.
I have one of those ground fly's for my big agnes 2person, im pretty sure its 2lb 8 ounces overall
11-09-2010 12:34 PM
schnutzy
Quote:
Originally Posted by Schwheelz View Post
Oh yeah and forget the mousepad thats just useless weight, it will soak up water and add a couple of ounces when your packing up (not helpful in the long run) just set your stove on top of a rock its cheaper and less things to carry
X2
in all the years of snow camping i have done. i have never had a stove melt threw the snow. i have even used snow to make a base to kinda craddle a stove.
11-09-2010 12:32 PM
schnutzy
Quote:
Originally Posted by Schwheelz View Post
Jeans are the absolute WORST thing to wear, buy a pair of rain pants from walmart and get wool leggings, when weight is not as much of an issue i usually just wear my polyester zipoffs, but make sure to wear gaitors and bring extra WOOL socks haha, a helpful pointer.. Cut out a small piece of plastic tarp to match your tent, and put it underneath the tent, you will wake up to a very wet sleeping bag in the middle of the night if you dont. I realize tents are supposedly waterproof, but ive experianced it firsthand
i like the synthetic socks over the wool, i got mine cheaper then my wool socks, and they work just as well, and sty a little more dry when playing outside.

with the tarp, a lot of the times you dont even need to cut it up, just get one that is the same size as your tent, and having the little holes at the ends makes it nice cause you can stake it down with your tent.there are specialty ground flys you can get for tents, but those normally are not worth it unless you are really trying to cut weight down. but thats at the extreme level that very few people actually need.
11-09-2010 12:27 PM
Schwheelz
Quote:
Originally Posted by Schwheelz

Jeans are the absolute WORST thing to wear, buy a pair of rain pants from walmart and get wool leggings, when weight is not as much of an issue i usually just wear my polyester zipoffs, but make sure to wear gaitors and bring extra WOOL socks haha, a helpful pointer.. Cut out a small piece of plastic tarp to match your tent, and put it underneath the tent, you will wake up to a very wet sleeping bag in the middle of the night if you dont. I realize tents are supposedly waterproof, but ive experianced it firsthand
Oh yeah and forget the mousepad thats just useless weight, it will soak up water and add a couple of ounces when your packing up (not helpful in the long run) just set your stove on top of a rock its cheaper and less things to carry
11-09-2010 12:25 PM
Schwheelz
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobjenkins

Hey thanks for the info. you got any quick tips for winter camping? Ivenever camped in snow before and theres alot of little useful tips that would be a great help if I know before going. like bring a mousepad to keep your camp stove from melting into the snow. Ive camped at low temps in the low teens but there wasnt any snow on the ground. that changes everythgin. and makes it funner! because of course you can get naked and roll around in the snow!!

BTW im planning on taking jeans and some cheap gaiters from the store. I hear jeans are a bad pick for cold. any other cheap solution in place of buying water resistant pants_?
Jeans are the absolute WORST thing to wear, buy a pair of rain pants from walmart and get wool leggings, when weight is not as much of an issue i usually just wear my polyester zipoffs, but make sure to wear gaitors and bring extra WOOL socks haha, a helpful pointer.. Cut out a small piece of plastic tarp to match your tent, and put it underneath the tent, you will wake up to a very wet sleeping bag in the middle of the night if you dont. I realize tents are supposedly waterproof, but ive experianced it firsthand
11-09-2010 12:10 PM
Se7endust1 I just bought all new snowboarding gear...which may or may not be what you are looking for. It's definitely warm stuff though. Most of the big name brands have (or a type of) gortex or thinsulate that everyone here is ranting about. You can run water from a faucet over my Burton jacket and the water rolls right off. dogfunk.com is where I got my stuff... sort by price or % off and you're bound to find some good deals.
11-09-2010 12:07 PM
schnutzy this is the carhartt jacket i have
Carhartt - Product - Men’s Duck Active Jac/Thermal Lined
11-09-2010 12:06 PM
bobjenkins
Quote:
Originally Posted by Schwheelz View Post
Ive climbed over 15 mountains over 14,000 feet, i have my own ice equipment and a plathura of jackets for a variety of tempatures, i usually base it from which jackets are good around zero then what jackets are good in the cold weather below -15

Best jacket ive ever had is my mountain hardware down jacket then a waterproof shell

Layering is the most important, dont get anything under armour unless its the long underwear, if you need help making decisions with what to pack then send me a pm with questions more than happy to help
Hey thanks for the info. you got any quick tips for winter camping? Ivenever camped in snow before and theres alot of little useful tips that would be a great help if I know before going. like bring a mousepad to keep your camp stove from melting into the snow. Ive camped at low temps in the low teens but there wasnt any snow on the ground. that changes everythgin. and makes it funner! because of course you can get naked and roll around in the snow!!


BTW im planning on taking jeans and some cheap gaiters from the store. I hear jeans are a bad pick for cold. any other cheap solution in place of buying water resistant pants_?
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