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Topic Review (Newest First)
11-26-2010 08:52 AM
Neil F. If you are going to do a BB soon, I would not bother changing shocks now. You will need different lengths. The BL has no impact on shock length. For the steering stabilizer, you can pick up a Monroe stabilizer from your local parts store for around 30.00 and it does just as good a job as the big names. That's what I have per recommendations.
11-26-2010 04:14 AM
Hostile JEEP T.J Umm ok I love how everyone gets into detail about stuff but come on!! All this he said she said stuff is confusing, LOL... I seen this thread and thought hey I was just gonna ask about some good shocks but now I'm confused!! I want to know whats the best shock to get on a jeep that's stock height right now but will be doing a 2.5" BB kit soon with probably a 1" to 1.25" BL that is driven on the road only on the weekends sometimes and does see trails alot? Also what is a great steering stabilizer to help out in that area too? Oh and please no debate just the honest truth! Thanks in advance...
11-24-2010 06:37 PM
rrich Magnums are "heavy duty" shocks. Of course they ride harder.
11-24-2010 06:25 PM
Ggg Neil, read post #7. But thanks to everyone for all the input I do appreciate it.
11-24-2010 05:46 PM
Neil F. You already got just such a recommendation with the Skyjackers. Do some research yourself and you will find that provide a soft ride. Skyjacker Softride Hydro Reviews, Ratings, Specs & Prices
11-24-2010 02:18 PM
Ggg rrich What you describe is how I understand shocks to operate and what the differences are. Thanks for the input.
I recommended gas shocks to my friend and asked for info on them here not for any perceived lift the gas would offer but rather that I think gas shocks would ride better than straight hydro shocks.
I do respectfully disagree with your recommendation of using run of the mill or Monroe shocks for a soft ride. The Jeep in question has Monroe magnums now and they are extremely harsh riding. I had Monroe magnums on my 1 ton pick up and it too was more harsh riding than the stock shocks were when the truck is unloaded. I eventually switched to some Bilstein's and they ride very nice regardless of load. They are pricey but I got what I paid for.
Guys, I really did not want to start an argument over terminology, just looking for some good first hand recommendations on some soft riding shocks.
11-24-2010 01:08 PM
doclouie Very well said.
11-24-2010 12:41 PM
rrich Funny how so many people fall for advertising hype.

Gas shocks are simply regular old shocks that have a low pressure charge of nitrogen instead of air. They all use oil as the dampener. Nitrogen is used to help prevent foaming of the oil. It's under slight pressure to keep the seals expanded - after a few thousand miles most gas shocks the gas has leaked out anyway.

The type of gas used has nothing to do the the ride quality under normal circumstances. If going down a bumpy road and the shock is constantly working, the oil tends to foam. Foam does not flow through the orifice properly, no more dampening. Removing the oxygen and other gasses helps stop the foaming, resisting temporary shock failure. The oil foam eventually brakes up anyway.

Simply look at a car where the shocks gave up the ghost and leaked. You can see the oil stains on the outside - whether they were gas charged or not.

Air shocks are still just regular shocks with a bladder that expands with air pressure to give that lift. They still have oil in them as the dampener.

Oil is used because it flows slowly through an orifice. To control how much dampening effect the mfgrs simply change the size of the orifice hole and the viscosity of the oil. The smaller the hole, or the thicker the oil, the more dampening effect. Gas or air would go through that hole way too fast to be effective.

Cut open any of those types to see how they work. Adjustable shocks like Rancho 9000's have a plunger behind the adjuster wheel that pushes a rod into the orifice for more or less restriction. 2 screws and you can see the little plunger.

Monotube, single tube, triple tube etc - much ado about nothing! They all have the same purpose - dampening!

The exotic shocks with the remote reservoir stores the oil in the can, rather than the shock body itself, allowing more travel on the shock. Some even have a fitting where you can add your own gas (not Taco Bell gas.)

Even very old cars used oil as a dampener - they were lever type, most had a filler cap to refill the oil! Many were adjustable - you simply changed the lever ratio. Many race cars. like Formula and Indy cars, still use a variation of that design - all oil filled.

Most all shocks are designed to control the rebound more than compression. (Try it - they collapse easy, but don't pull apart near as easy.) They are not 50/50 unless specifically ordered. Most are more like 40/60.

'Some specialty shocks are just the opposite - drag racers often use shocks in the front - 80/20 or so. The idea is let the front end come up then hold it up for the rest of the run - transferring more weight to the rear traction wheels.


For soft shocks simply order standard run of the mill shocks, Monroe or equivalent.

More than likely the OP wanted gas shocks thinking they'd give the rig a little more height. Wrong. The gas pressure in gas shocks is so slight they won't push the body up significantly.
Notice how gas shocks come from the factory - they are collapsed with a plastic strap holding them. When you put them on you hook the top on the mount, then cut the strap, as the shock slowly expands as it passes the lower mount - you quick shove it on the mount. If you miss, the shock expands all the way - but you can push it back up with your hand - it's not difficult, just a PITA. If it had anything more than slight pressure when you cut the strap it would fly open so fast you'd get hurt. You'd never be able to push it up enough to get it on the lower mount.

How much can you lift the body with your hand? Not much!

We probably installed several thousand shocks. Pep Boys used to have the best prices - they sold Monroes much cheaper than I paid wholesale - I only bought by the truckloads, they bought by the trainloads!
11-24-2010 11:45 AM
jgorm
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jerry Bransford View Post
Gas shocks are not the same as hydraulic shocks and Skyjacker Hydros are hydraulic, they are not gas charged.

Gas charged shocks are generally, however, typically much stiffer riding than hydraulic shocks are. So if you want softer riding shocks, there are not many soft riding gas-charged shocks so I'd concentrate on hydraulic shocks, not gas.
Its funny when you are 100% wrong, but can't admit it.

If you want a soft cushy ride, get gas charged shocks, or even better gas charged shocks with dynamic valving. If you want a dump truck ride, then get non gas charged shocks (they are always cheaper too!)
11-23-2010 03:47 PM
jgorm
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jerry Bransford View Post
Again, show me a purely hydraulic monotube shock that we use on our jeeps.
Quote:
5100 Series Shock Absorbers

The 5100 Series offers traditional Bilstein technology with applications for lifted trucks, Jeeps and prerunners. 5100 Series shocks feature Bilstein's superior single tube high gas pressure design for the upmost in consistent fade-free performance and long life.
The product benefits at a glance:

* Monotube gas pressure construction
* Self-Adjusting Deflecting Disc Valving
* High-Flow Piston Reduces Harshness
* Independent Rebound & Compression Tuning
* Larger Working Piston Area for Exact Damping
* Superior Control for Large Diameter Tires
* Designed for specific manufacturer lift kits utilizing the stock O.E.M. mounting configuration.

Now the question you have avoided again and again.
Quote:
Originally Posted by jgorm View Post
Maybe you can clarify this post on how non gas charged hydraulic shocks ride smoother than the air charged versions. (generally, however, typically)
11-23-2010 03:31 PM
Jerry Bransford Again, show me a purely hydraulic monotube shock that we use on our jeeps.
11-23-2010 03:23 PM
jgorm
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jerry Bransford View Post
All twin tube shocks are hydraulic. 99% of monotube shocks are nitrogen gas, not air or hydraulic, charged. Show me a hydraulic monotube shock that is commonly used on or recommended for our Jeeps.
monotube shocks use oil and are therefore hydraulic. The nitrogen gas is used to keep the oil from foaming.

Maybe you can clarify this post on how non gas charged hydraulic shocks ride smoother than the air charged versions. (generally, however, typically)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jerry Bransford View Post
Gas shocks are not the same as hydraulic shocks and Skyjacker Hydros are hydraulic, they are not gas charged.

Gas charged shocks are generally, however, typically much stiffer riding than hydraulic shocks are. So if you want softer riding shocks, there are not many soft riding gas-charged shocks so I'd concentrate on hydraulic shocks, not gas.
11-23-2010 02:49 PM
Jerry Bransford All twin tube shocks are hydraulic. 99% of monotube shocks are nitrogen gas, not air or hydraulic, charged. Show me a hydraulic monotube shock that is commonly used on or recommended for our Jeeps.
11-23-2010 01:48 PM
jgorm All shocks are hydraulic except for the not so common air shocks. When people say "hydraulic shock" they typically mean a non- gas charged monotube design. If you follow what you say in your last post, then the post I quoted makes no sense at all.
11-23-2010 10:46 AM
Jerry Bransford Twin-tube shocks are all, to the best of my knowledge anyway, hydraulic. Rancho's R5000 is a twin tube hydraulic, ProComp's ES-3000 is too, so is Rubicon Express's twin-tube... all are hydraulic. Rancho tries to imply their R5000 is "gas" but it is truly a hydraulic shock. The gas they refer to only refers to some gas-blown neopreme seals used inside.
11-23-2010 10:40 AM
jgorm
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jerry Bransford View Post
Gas shocks are not the same as hydraulic shocks and Skyjacker Hydros are hydraulic, they are not gas charged.

Gas charged shocks are generally, however, typically much stiffer riding than hydraulic shocks are. So if you want softer riding shocks, there are not many soft riding gas-charged shocks so I'd concentrate on hydraulic shocks, not gas.
My experience is the exact opposite. Maybe you are thinking about air shocks, not gas charged shocks?

Twin tube gas charged shocks are by far the most common shock on passenger vehicles where people are concerned about ride quality. If you get shocks with acceleration sensitive dampening (like bilsteins) then you get the best of both worlds. Soft dampening for the little bumps, and then firm dampening when you get into body roll and bigger hits. This is a pretty good article that covers the different shock types.
Monroe Technical Support - What is a Shock Absorber?
11-23-2010 10:39 AM
doclouie Jerry may be able to answer the difference between the shocks as he has had Ranchos, but I am not sure about the Skyjackers. Let me just say that the soft setting on these shocks is softer than my Dodge Caravan that I must drive when all the family needs to go somewhere. When I put them on the highest setting it literally will be so stiff that it will give me a headache if I drive any amount of distance. It drives even worse than my Rancho 5000s. This is my first set of adjustable Ranchos and I must be honest they are great. I use the softest setting for in town driving, a medium setting for highway driving and the hardest setting for when I make it to Moab. I do not believe it has taken me so long to purchase these shocks and I will never go to a normal shock. Don't get me wrong there are great standard shocks out there and I cannot knock something that I have not owned. Rancho 5000s are garbage though for a Jeep and yes I have owned them. When you purchase a standard shock you receive the valving or the ride that the manufacturer thought was best. This may or may not be to your liking. When you purchase Rancho 9000 adjustables that come with a lifetime warranty you decide the softness or the hardness of the ride and what is best for you. You can have the exact ride of other shocks by just adjusting them to that setting or you can change it to the setting you like best. I just love my 9000s and with the warranty I will have them forever, like my Jeep. Let me know if you have any other questions.
11-23-2010 10:35 AM
Ggg
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ggg View Post
Good point Jerry I suppose I can talk him into some hydros since his first priority is a soft ride. But do you have any suggestions?
I have done some research and have three so far that look good:
Bilstein 5100
OME Nitrocharger
Skyjacker Softride Hydros
I was not able to finish my post at the time, nor edit it later for content so I will here.
On the gas v/s hydro shocks it is my understanding that gas shocks ride smoother than hydraulic shocks. The gas helps keep the oil from foaming so it allows the use of oil and valving that would otherwise cause the oil to foam in hydraulic shocks. Therefore the tuning options are much greater with gas shocks than what can be done with hydro shocks.
I'm no shock expert but thats how I understand the subject, for which I may be wrong.
Jerry thanks for the info on the specific part numbers. I agree the adjustable shock for this person is money not well spent
11-23-2010 10:28 AM
Jerry Bransford
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ggg View Post
Good point Jerry I suppose I can talk him into some hydros since his first priority is a soft ride. But do you have any suggestions?
I have done some research and have three so far that look good:
Bilstein 5100
OME Nitrocharger
Skyjacker Softride Hydros
Unless you get the specific model of the Bistein 5100 that is specificaly valved for the Wrangler, it will be too stiff. Some dealers don't know it exists or are too lazy to look it up so just be wary of that. The OME Nitrocharger, as I have on my Rubicon, is has a good ride but in no way could it be considered cushy. My wife thinks my Rubicon rides tooo stiffly. Of those three, only the Skyjackers will really have that soft ride it sounds like he wants. The 9-way adjustable Rancho R9000x shocks ride pretty soft down at their 1 or 2 settings but that's a pretty expensive shock to be buying if he won't ever be adjusting it to the stiffer settings for some trail conditions.
11-23-2010 09:19 AM
Katalst The Rancho seem like a good idea. Does the "soft" setting get to a comfort range of the Skyjacker? I know this is subjective, but what I am really asking is if the "soft" is soft for a truck, or more in the range of an auto. Hope that makes sense.
11-22-2010 08:59 PM
Ggg Good point Jerry I suppose I can talk him into some hydros since his first priority is a soft ride. But do you have any suggestions?
I have done some research and have three so far that look good:
Bilstein 5100
OME Nitrocharger
Skyjacker Softride Hydros
11-22-2010 08:54 PM
doclouie Take a look at Rancho 9000 adjustables as you can adjust them as soft or as hard as you like. I enjoy the the car like ride in the city, but change the settings when I go off roading. They are a little pricey, but they carry a lifetime warranty so you will only purchase them once.
11-22-2010 08:54 PM
Jp90Talon In my opinion go OME and dont look back
11-22-2010 08:38 PM
Jerry Bransford Gas shocks are not the same as hydraulic shocks and Skyjacker Hydros are hydraulic, they are not gas charged.

Gas charged shocks are generally, however, typically much stiffer riding than hydraulic shocks are. So if you want softer riding shocks, there are not many soft riding gas-charged shocks so I'd concentrate on hydraulic shocks, not gas.
11-22-2010 07:56 PM
25172021k Yes. I am very happy with my skyjacker hydros.
11-22-2010 07:48 PM
Neil F. Skyjacker Hydros are known to have a good ride and are sized for a 2" lift so they will work fine.
11-22-2010 05:26 PM
Ggg
soft gas shocks

I am looking for some soft gas shocks for a stock to 1.75"bb TJ. A friend has a 1.75"bb, but the shocks he bought (Monroe) are way too stiff. All the shocks I know are soft start at a 3" lift. The guy is looking for a "car like ride".
Any recommendations based on first hand experience?

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