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-   -   Best tire deflators? (http://www.wranglerforum.com/f282/best-tire-deflators-100851.html)

necromancer_tat 07-03-2011 12:05 AM

Best tire deflators?
 
Which tire deflators do you use? Out of these 3 are their any recomendations?

Smittybilt Part 2723 - Tire Deflators by Smittybilt

Staun Automatic Tire Deflators - 6-30psi

Trailhead 5-20 PSI Automatic Tire Deflators - Trail Gear & Tools

Thanks!

eugenesonrisa 07-03-2011 01:54 AM

I use a key... It was free.

s3nt3nc3d 07-03-2011 03:09 AM

I've heard good things about the Stauns

H2_recoveryteam 07-03-2011 03:18 AM

I use smittys. Got em cheap on ebay and i like being able to walk away and come back and there all deflated like magic.

necromancer_tat 07-03-2011 06:15 AM

Which ones are the most accurate? Does anyone know which ones would be best for sand? If I where to screw these on just as I entered the beach, and drove on them for a while as they deflated which ones would I be able to do that with and still have them work like they're supposed to?

Jerry Bransford 07-03-2011 10:39 AM

This one sold by Currie... it's fast. I can have all four of my tires deflated and be ready to go before my friends get their first tire deflated. ARB sells the same product with their name on it.

http://cn1.kaboodle.com/hi/img/b/0/0...=1305975007000

It's so fast because it has a cool way of completely removing the valve stem so the air gets out fast. Your fingers never touch the valve stem, it stays inside the brass holder that is screwed onto the tire. Plus you don't have to screw with resetting it for different conditions, you simply air the tire down to whatever pressure is appropriate for the particular trail you're on. Automatic deflators always take the tire down to the same air pressure which isn't the correct tire pressure for every possible trail you'll go on. Some trails I go down below 8 psi, easy trails I run at 12-13 psi. Easily done with this type of deflator.

Mine always ends up getting used by several Jeepers after I'm done using it, they're always amazed how well it works and how fast it gets the tire aired down. Seconds vs. minutes.

The key method is ok if you offroad only once a year and you don't mind making your better equipped friends wait on you. ;)

Rogerg 07-03-2011 10:55 AM

I use the Smitty brand and got it set for 8 psi.Put the buggers on while i watch guys who uses nails,sticks,keys etc and keeps checking to see what pressure they have.

Im all about easy.

Scoob 07-03-2011 10:57 AM

I run the trailhead ones only because I got a great deal on them from a fleabay auction.
I had the stauns before that but somebody stole them on the trail. To me they are both pretty close to the same. The Stauns seemed like a little higher quality but I have never had a problem with either.

Smittybilt, I wouldn't buy any of their crap. Every product they make is nothing but junk.

Jerry Bransford 07-03-2011 11:00 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Scoob (Post 1349796)
Smittybilt, I wouldn't buy any of their crap. Every product they make is nothing but junk.

X2, they are made in China.

Provelogear 07-03-2011 02:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jerry Bransford (Post 1349770)
This one sold by Currie... it's fast. I can have all four of my tires deflated and be ready to go before my friends get their first tire deflated. ARB sells the same product with their name on it.

http://cn1.kaboodle.com/hi/img/b/0/0...=1305975007000

It's so fast because it has a cool way of completely removing the valve stem so the air gets out fast. Your fingers never touch the valve stem, it stays inside the brass holder that is screwed onto the tire. Plus you don't have to screw with resetting it for different conditions, you simply air the tire down to whatever pressure is appropriate for the particular trail you're on. Automatic deflators always take the tire down to the same air pressure which isn't the correct tire pressure for every possible trail you'll go on. Some trails I go down below 8 psi, easy trails I run at 12-13 psi. Easily done with this type of deflator.

Mine always ends up getting used by several Jeepers after I'm done using it, they're always amazed how well it works and how fast it gets the tire aired down. Seconds vs. minutes.

The key method is ok if you offroad only once a year and you don't mind making your better equipped friends wait on you. ;)

X2! Fastest and usually the most accurate.

Elwood 07-03-2011 03:23 PM

I have the stauns and love them.

necromancer_tat 07-03-2011 04:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jerry Bransford (Post 1349770)
This one sold by Currie... it's fast. I can have all four of my tires deflated and be ready to go before my friends get their first tire deflated. ARB sells the same product with their name on it.

http://cn1.kaboodle.com/hi/img/b/0/0...=1305975007000

It's so fast because it has a cool way of completely removing the valve stem so the air gets out fast. Your fingers never touch the valve stem, it stays inside the brass holder that is screwed onto the tire. Plus you don't have to screw with resetting it for different conditions, you simply air the tire down to whatever pressure is appropriate for the particular trail you're on. Automatic deflators always take the tire down to the same air pressure which isn't the correct tire pressure for every possible trail you'll go on. Some trails I go down below 8 psi, easy trails I run at 12-13 psi. Easily done with this type of deflator.

Mine always ends up getting used by several Jeepers after I'm done using it, they're always amazed how well it works and how fast it gets the tire aired down. Seconds vs. minutes.

The key method is ok if you offroad only once a year and you don't mind making your better equipped friends wait on you. ;)

This is one I haven't heard about before. Once the valve stem is screwed out, how hard is it to replace it when you hit your desired pressure?

Rogerg 07-03-2011 06:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Scoob (Post 1349796)
I run the trailhead ones only because I got a great deal on them from a fleabay auction.
I had the stauns before that but somebody stole them on the trail. To me they are both pretty close to the same. The Stauns seemed like a little higher quality but I have never had a problem with either.

Smittybilt, I wouldn't buy any of their crap. Every product they make is nothing but junk.

I agree with some of your comment but have you actually seen any Smitty deflator fail?

Provelogear 07-03-2011 06:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by necromancer_tat (Post 1350319)
This is one I haven't heard about before. Once the valve stem is screwed out, how hard is it to replace it when you hit your desired pressure?

The stem in encapsulated in the tool. You loosen the stem and it stays inside the tube. Move the realeas up and down to stop air release and check pressure. At the desired pressure tighten the valve stem up. Usually takes a couple minutes.

necromancer_tat 07-03-2011 08:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Provelogear (Post 1350489)
The stem in encapsulated in the tool. You loosen the stem and it stays inside the tube. Move the realeas up and down to stop air release and check pressure. At the desired pressure tighten the valve stem up. Usually takes a couple minutes.

Thanks for the information, I'm gonna try to find more information on them. I found this video of the arb version on youtube. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=87rCW_GC638

necromancer_tat 01-26-2013 01:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jerry Bransford (Post 1349770)
This one sold by Currie... it's fast. I can have all four of my tires deflated and be ready to go before my friends get their first tire deflated. ARB sells the same product with their name on it.

http://cn1.kaboodle.com/hi/img/b/0/0...=1305975007000

It's so fast because it has a cool way of completely removing the valve stem so the air gets out fast. Your fingers never touch the valve stem, it stays inside the brass holder that is screwed onto the tire. Plus you don't have to screw with resetting it for different conditions, you simply air the tire down to whatever pressure is appropriate for the particular trail you're on. Automatic deflators always take the tire down to the same air pressure which isn't the correct tire pressure for every possible trail you'll go on. Some trails I go down below 8 psi, easy trails I run at 12-13 psi. Easily done with this type of deflator.

Mine always ends up getting used by several Jeepers after I'm done using it, they're always amazed how well it works and how fast it gets the tire aired down. Seconds vs. minutes.

The key method is ok if you offroad only once a year and you don't mind making your better equipped friends wait on you. ;)

Quote:

Originally Posted by Provelogear (Post 1350167)
X2! Fastest and usually the most accurate.

So... a year and a half later I have been using the Currie deflator recommended by JB and Gerald, and after several trips off road airing my tires down I'm SOLD! I can usually deflate all of my tires down in about 1/4 of the time my friends can using individual tire deflators, and mine costed about half of what theirs did! :punk:

DevilDogDoc 01-26-2013 03:18 PM

Gotta get me one I just use a valve stem tool and pull the stem out but I overshoot it sometimes.

jgorm 01-26-2013 03:39 PM

I've been using the stauns for years now. I check it when its done and its always within 1psi of what I set it to. By the time I have the 4th one screwed on the first is just about done, and I don't have to stay swatted down by the tire watching the gauge the entire time.

572 01-26-2013 03:46 PM

I have yet to air my tires down when wheeling. I usually just stay on the easy trails so far, but the ride is really rough with the full tires.

After reading this thread I went ahead and ordered the ARB version of the Currie deflator posted here. I also ordered a Viair 450P. I ordered them both on Amazon just a few minutes ago.

I figured the Viair compressor would come in handy for other uses since it's portable. I plan to take it with me on long road trips in the car or truck with a plug kit. :thumb:

Jerry Bransford 01-26-2013 04:46 PM

You'll love that deflator. One thing to remember is once it is threaded onto the stem & you have used the center knob to unscrew & remove the valve, that you have to pull back on the big brass part to open the ports from which the air dumps through so quickly.

The first time I used mine, I forgot to pull back on that sliding piece & I was disappointed how slow it was. Then I figured it out & that's when it became impressive. After many different deflators over the past 20 years, that's the one I have stuck with.

Finally, don't be afraid to air down to a low enough pressure to actually help. Some are afraid to go below 15 psi but don't be. You really need to be down to 12-13 for it to really help. At that pressure, you don't have to worry about it coming unseated. I had one guy in a new Rubicon in my group years ago who was having too much trouble for the moderate-level trail we were on. He thought being aired to 20 psi was being aired "way down" after I asked him what pressure he was at. It took us a while to convince him to go down to 12 psi where his problems ceased.

necromancer_tat 01-26-2013 05:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jerry Bransford (Post 3281982)
You'll love that deflator. One thing to remember is once it is threaded onto the stem & you have used the center knob to unscrew & remove the valve, that you have to pull back on the big brass part to open the ports from which the air dumps through so quickly.

The first time I used mine, I forgot to pull back on that sliding piece & I was disappointed how slow it was. Then I figured it out & that's when it became impressive. After many different deflators over the past 20 years, that's the one I have stuck with.

Finally, don't be afraid to air down to a low enough pressure to actually help. Some are afraid to go below 15 psi but don't be. You really need to be down to 12-13 for it to really help. At that pressure, you don't have to worry about it coming unseated. I had one guy in a new Rubicon in my group years ago who was having too much trouble for the moderate-level trail we were on. He thought being aired to 20 psi was being aired "way down" after I asked him what pressure he was at. It took us a while to convince him to go down to 12 psi where his problems ceased.

I love the Currie deflator! I originally took my tires down to 12 psi, then 10, and then 8 psi and didn't have any unseating problems. I moved to beadlock rims and now deflate to 5 psi. The Currie/ARB deflator makes it so much easier and faster than any other option I've used so far.

572 01-26-2013 05:12 PM

I watched the video posted ^^^^ up there somewhere. It looked like it worked pretty good, plus I like that it has the big guage. I guess it might not be a bad idea to carry a spare valve core. But I guess if a valve core messed up you could always use the one out of the spare tire.

I hope airing the tires down will help with the rough ride. Everyone goes faster than me. But it feels like if I go much faster parts are gonna start flying off. :redface:

amiller 01-26-2013 05:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rogerg (Post 1350483)
I agree with some of your comment but have you actually seen any Smitty deflator fail?

Yes, they are nearly impossible to get set and then the o-rings fell out of mine.

98 tj sport 01-26-2013 05:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jerry Bransford (Post 3281982)
You'll love that deflator. One thing to remember is once it is threaded onto the stem & you have used the center knob to unscrew & remove the valve, that you have to pull back on the big brass part to open the ports from which the air dumps through so quickly.

The first time I used mine, I forgot to pull back on that sliding piece & I was disappointed how slow it was. Then I figured it out & that's when it became impressive. After many different deflators over the past 20 years, that's the one I have stuck with.

Finally, don't be afraid to air down to a low enough pressure to actually help. Some are afraid to go below 15 psi but don't be. You really need to be down to 12-13 for it to really help. At that pressure, you don't have to worry about it coming unseated. I had one guy in a new Rubicon in my group years ago who was having too much trouble for the moderate-level trail we were on. He thought being aired to 20 psi was being aired "way down" after I asked him what pressure he was at. It took us a while to convince him to go down to 12 psi where his problems ceased.

Quick question jerry I run 33 12.50 on 15x10 wheels(ik, ik but I got 2 of them free). Anyway do u think I would have problems airing down to 10-15 psi such as loosing a bead with the wider wheels I usually air down to like 20 cuz id wanna loose a bead but after what u said idk.

eyeball 01-26-2013 05:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 572 (Post 3282077)
...plus I like that it has the big guage.

It doesn't affect functionality but I can't imagine why Currie choose to use a 60 psi gauge...

necromancer_tat 01-26-2013 06:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 98 tj sport (Post 3282120)
Quick question jerry I run 33 12.50 on 15x10 wheels(ik, ik but I got 2 of them free). Anyway do u think I would have problems airing down to 10-15 psi such as loosing a bead with the wider wheels I usually air down to like 20 cuz id wanna loose a bead but after what u said idk.

I ran 35" tires on 15" rims down to 8psi with 10" wide rims on some pretty nasty rock crawling trails and I never had an issue. A fellow Jeeper running 35's lost a bead on the same trails running 35's with an 8" wide rim running 12 psi... sometimes the trail just wins... He was able to reseat the bead really easily with a 12 volt compressor after cleaning the mud off the bead surface.

Quote:

Originally Posted by eyeball (Post 3282153)
It doesn't affect functionality but I can't imagine why Currie choose to use a 60 psi gauge...

The E-Z deflator is made by another company and Currie, ARB, etc. just put their name on it... I imagine that the gauge goes to 60 PSI for those running full sized 1 ton rigs and such...

TJDave 01-26-2013 07:12 PM

Currie EZ Deflator for me.

Best $30.00 I've ever spent.

Black Magic Brakes 01-26-2013 07:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by necromancer_tat (Post 1349278)

As per their modus operandi, SB copied something they saw others selling without really understanding the finer details as to what really makes them work. Being around the owners of both the Staun and Oasis brands, I've had the benefit of many dissections of all 3 versions.

By far the most user friendly of these three in this style is the Staun. I've messed with several of my buddies who have the Oasis and followed them around their rig after the screw them on and put my thumb over the end to stop the air flow. If you wait a bit and time it long enough, they will air down halfway and then won't restart. :rofl:

The SB is difficult to set, not very accurate and is at best a poor copy of a good product, but again, it's SB, why wouldn't it be?

The Stauns have a little stem sticking out the top that you simply pop up again to finish airing down if you have someone like me mess with them. They used to be and may still be offered in a couple of ranges of pressures so they could be as accurate as possible.

They and the Oasis are both US made local here in SoCal if that matters to anyone or were the last time I checked.

Personally, I use either a valve stem remover or the screw on style that just lets air out and a low pressure digital race car gauge.

rjacobs 01-26-2013 08:43 PM

whoever bumped this thread is a bastard. I just ordered the Currie EZ Deflator.

necromancer_tat 01-26-2013 10:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rjacobs (Post 3282872)
whoever bumped this thread is a bastard.

I guess I've been called worse, lol! :hide:


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