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-   -   Curri Anti-Rock (http://www.wranglerforum.com/f282/curri-anti-rock-121956.html)

BackCountryMud 11-09-2011 05:33 PM

Curri Anti-Rock
 
How is the Curri Anti-Rock on the road? I drive daily on the interstate and I wanted to know if installing this would make the TJ just an offroad toy and not a daily driver. Thanks :thumb:

Imped 11-09-2011 05:42 PM

That's an open-ended question. What's your shock and suspension setup like?

It's common sense that the AR will allow more body roll than the stock sway bar. If you've got soft shocks and rubber bushings everywhere, it'll feel like a boat. If you've got good gas-charged shocks and joints everywhere, it'll be great. With the AR on the second to last setting, my rig handles like it's on rails but it's very, very far from stock.

Add a rear AR (heavier rate than stock) and it'll be awesome.

Answer: Don't fear the extra body roll on the road, it's pretty minimal. I drive mine daily and wouldn't have it any other way and I drive more aggressively than most. The stock sway bar sucks on and off the road.

necromancer_tat 11-09-2011 05:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Imped (Post 1732964)
That's an open-ended question. What's your shock and suspension setup like?

It's common sense that the AR will allow more body roll than the stock sway bar. If you've got soft shocks and rubber bushings everywhere, it'll feel like a boat. If you've got good gas-charged shocks and joints everywhere, it'll be great. With the AR on the second to last setting, my rig handles like it's on rails but it's very, very far from stock.

Add a rear AR (heavier rate than stock) and it'll be awesome.

Answer: Don't fear the extra body roll on the road, it's pretty minimal. I drive mine daily and wouldn't have it any other way and I drive more aggressively than most. The stock sway bar sucks on and off the road.

I don't have the anti rock, but I do have a similar torsion bar front sway bar, I have noticed that when my Jeep leans one way or the other I have to make steering corrections depending on which way it leans. I don't have to do that in my stock Rubicon TJ... do you think my softer front sway bar allows that, or do you think it's caused by rear steer from having a 4" lift on short arms?

Imped 11-09-2011 06:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by necromancer_tat (Post 1733010)
I don't have the anti rock, but I do have a similar torsion bar front sway bar, I have noticed that when my Jeep leans one way or the other I have to make steering corrections depending on which way it leans. I don't have to do that in my stock Rubicon TJ... do you think my softer front sway bar allows that, or do you think it's caused by rear steer from having a 4" lift on short arms?

I have no idea what the rate is on your sway bar but if you're having to make steering corrections then it's probably a suspension issue. With stock mounts you've got a lower roll axis (allowing more body roll) and the inherent loosey-goosey behavior of rubber bushings. That's why I said it's an open-ended question. Set up a rig with quality parts and nice suspension geometry and it doesn't matter if the sway bars are a bit soft. It will still drive better than stock in every category.

necromancer_tat 11-09-2011 06:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Imped (Post 1733065)
I have no idea what the rate is on your sway bar but if you're having to make steering corrections then it's probably a suspension issue. With stock mounts you've got a lower roll axis (allowing more body roll) and the inherent loosey-goosey behavior of rubber bushings. That's why I said it's an open-ended question. Set up a rig with quality parts and nice suspension geometry and it doesn't matter if the sway bars are a bit soft. It will still drive better than stock in every category.

I don't know either, I replaced my track bar bushing, the steering gear box, and the steering linkage and TRE's so far. I've got the Currie upper and lower control arms and Axle housing Johnny Joint kit waiting to be installed, but I'm building an HP D30 to replace my LP D30 before I install the Currie control arms.

The odd thing is that whenever I replace an old worn out part with a nice new part, my problems get worse instead of better... I've got a hypothesis about it, but untill I've replaced each part one at a time then I'm basically just observing and guessing at the results. :facepalm:

Ageless Stranger 11-09-2011 06:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Imped
That's an open-ended question. What's your shock and suspension setup like?

It's common sense that the AR will allow more body roll than the stock sway bar. If you've got soft shocks and rubber bushings everywhere, it'll feel like a boat. If you've got good gas-charged shocks and joints everywhere, it'll be great. With the AR on the second to last setting, my rig handles like it's on rails but it's very, very far from stock.

Add a rear AR (heavier rate than stock) and it'll be awesome.

Answer: Don't fear the extra body roll on the road, it's pretty minimal. I drive mine daily and wouldn't have it any other way and I drive more aggressively than most. The stock sway bar sucks on and off the road.

I can't put it any better than this. I love my AR.

IslandTJ 11-09-2011 06:50 PM

I have a SwayLOC dual rate bar, it's great for both on the road and off road conditions. One of the negative points of the SwayLOC, is the price - it's not cheap.

Jerry Bransford 11-09-2011 07:46 PM

I've had two different TJs, each with Currie's Antirock, and both TJs are daily drivers. One TJ had soft shocks, my present TJ has fairly firm shocks and both were fine on the highway/moutain roads. My present TJ handles better with the firmer shocks (OME Nitrochargers) but by no means did I think the previous Jeep with its softer Jeeps had any type of handling issues. Both Antirocks were set to their loosest settings so even at their loosest setting, they are still fine. No worries at all, drive it like a Jeep and not a sports car and you'll be fine. :)

geiman 11-10-2011 08:46 AM

Another daily driver here with the Anti-Rock. I drive about 55 miles one way to work (sometimes more) on all kinds of roads; interstate, crossing mountains, back roads, etc.. The AR handles great, and not once have I felt less in control or had to correct my steering because of it. The AR is definitely worth every penny.

miketx 11-10-2011 11:19 AM

This looks pretty cool. Newbie question here: if you have the Anti-Rock swaybar, do you still need disconnects?

geiman 11-10-2011 11:22 AM

Nope, no need for disconnects; the AR does what everyone tries to do with disconnects the right way:

Max. Flex vs. Useful Flex and The Anti-rock - JeepForum.com

Best part is, no climbing under a muddy Jeep trying to align and reconnect disconnects after a hard day of wheeling (and dealing with keeping your disconnected sway bar up out of the way).

TJDave 11-10-2011 11:40 AM

Love my Antirock. One of my favorite mods. Set on the loosest setting. A bit more body roll on the road, but a little common sense goes a long ways. Drive it like it's a Jeep, because it is.

Kota7x 11-10-2011 01:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jerry Bransford (Post 1733362)
I've had two different TJs, each with Currie's Antirock, and both TJs are daily drivers. One TJ had soft shocks, my present TJ has fairly firm shocks and both were fine on the highway/moutain roads. My present TJ handles better with the firmer shocks (OME Nitrochargers) but by no means did I think the previous Jeep with its softer Jeeps had any type of handling issues. Both Antirocks were set to their loosest settings so even at their loosest setting, they are still fine. No worries at all, drive it like a Jeep and not a sports car and you'll be fine. :)

X2

I love my AR. Mine is on the last setting and it is perfect for the road. I had it on the middle setting and found it too stiff for driving off road. If you are worried about the handling start in the middle and move in the direction you think you need to go.

BackCountryMud 11-13-2011 09:20 AM

Thanks for the input. I would have to purchase the front and rear AR swaybars, correct? Totalling to about $600-700?

Kota7x 11-13-2011 09:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BackCountryMud
Thanks for the input. I would have to purchase the front and rear AR swaybars, correct? Totalling to about $600-700?

No you can just get the front or just the rear.

Jerry Bransford 11-13-2011 09:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BackCountryMud (Post 1741236)
Thanks for the input. I would have to purchase the front and rear AR swaybars, correct? Totalling to about $600-700?

Just the front. The rear OE antiswaybar is fine as is. :)

BackCountryMud 11-13-2011 10:04 AM

Awesome, thanks for the help! :thumb:

Imped 11-13-2011 12:54 PM

While the rear AR isn't 'needed', it's definitely an upgrade over stock. With its heavier rate, it'll handle better on the road and force the front AR to work more.

BillG.OTD 11-14-2011 09:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by geiman (Post 1734839)
Nope, no need for disconnects; the AR does what everyone tries to do with disconnects the right way:

Max. Flex vs. Useful Flex and The Anti-rock - JeepForum.com

Best part is, no climbing under a muddy Jeep trying to align and reconnect disconnects after a hard day of wheeling (and dealing with keeping your disconnected sway bar up out of the way).

Good info on the link. The disco has been one of the best mods I have made (could really tell the difference) I have heard lots of good things about the Currie and spent some time on their website. It has 5 different settings, Do most people keep it on the same one? Or would you change it for a day of off roading and back again when you are on the street? How hard is it to change settings? Same as discos? I have to say that can be a pain...

geiman 11-15-2011 07:39 AM

I would say most people put it at one setting and leave it there, at least that's what I do. I have mine in the second to last setting when counting from the left (the second most loose setting). Not having to fool with it before and after wheeling is one of the benefits to having the Anti-Rock.

It's not hard to change which setting you wish to use, but it does require removing and then reinstalling a nut, so it might be 5 minutes worth of work. I can honestly say that I have never really noticed the AR making my Jeep more loose feeling on the road so I really wouldn't worry about it. But, if you would prefer a more stock like sway bar for on the street you can look into the SwayLOC. It "locks and unlocks" to give you the stiffness of the stock sway bar on the street, and the benefits of the Anti-Rock off road. But it's considerably more money, so keep that in mind. It wasn't worth the extra cash to me, so I went with the traditional AR, and I couldn't be more happy. I honestly can't see wanting it to be any stiffer for on the street.

Mortalis5509 11-15-2011 04:48 PM

Buy it and run it as its loose setting. I have currie coils, fox shocks, front AR, and it handles great.

BillG.OTD 11-15-2011 05:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mortalis5509 (Post 1747350)
Buy it and run it as its loose setting. I have currie coils, fox shocks, front AR, and it handles great.

I think I will...looks like a straight forward install and I assume a basic kit. I have Rancho 9000 shocks and can adjust the settings on them to be stiffer if needed. They do make a lighter aluminum version for $60 more, not sure how much weight we are talking....

geiman 11-15-2011 05:33 PM

As far as I understand the weight savings really are negligible, they're mainly there for looks.

And it's a very straightforward install; mine probably took less than an hour start to finish.

Mortalis5509 11-15-2011 11:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BillG.OTD (Post 1747426)
I think I will...looks like a straight forward install and I assume a basic kit. I have Rancho 9000 shocks and can adjust the settings on them to be stiffer if needed. They do make a lighter aluminum version for $60 more, not sure how much weight we are talking....

It's easy and save your 60 bucks because it is not worth it.

KidRock171 11-16-2011 12:36 AM

What about aluminum control arms? (Quick hijack sorry) getting Rokmen arms with JJ's but currie has aluminum arms now. Negligible?

geiman 11-16-2011 07:42 AM

For weight? I would imagine so. I have the aluminum ones from Savvy and they are very very nice, I have no complaints. I haven't compared their weight to a regular steel control arm, but I wouldn't imagine it would have much; I could be wrong though. Savvy can hook you up with steel, aluminum, double adjustable, regular adjustable, etc...

Imped 11-16-2011 08:47 AM

The weight savings adds up, but that's not why I would recommend aluminum AR arms or control arms. No rust and the cool/bling factor is the point there. Aluminum is just straight up cool.

geiman 11-16-2011 08:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Imped (Post 1749269)
The weight savings adds up, but that's not why I would recommend aluminum AR arms or control arms. No rust and the cool/bling factor is the point there. Aluminum is just straight up cool.

:thumb:

Plus it's great seeing everyone's face scrunch up when you say you've got aluminum protecting your vehicle instead of steel.

KidRock171 11-16-2011 01:45 PM

Lol. I'm young and dumb. Guess I just havnt bought into beer can armor yet. the way it's forged I'm sure it's plenty tough. But I'm going to give it another couple years to prove itself before I invest in aluminum skids arms n such.

Imped 11-16-2011 01:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KidRock171 (Post 1749878)
Lol. I'm young and dumb. Guess I just havnt bought into beer can armor yet. the way it's forged I'm sure it's plenty tough. But I'm going to give it another couple years to prove itself before I invest in aluminum skids arms n such.

Forged?

Learn a few things about materials, ultimate/tensile/yield strength, do the comparisons, and make a decision. There's no reason to "wait a couple years".....the research and 'proving' has already been done. Guys (the smart ones) have been running aluminum armor (belly pans, corners, rocker guards, bumpers) for years in the toughest stuff you can wheel. It holds up fine and weighs nothing.

For example--my full Rokmen aluminum corners weigh 11 lbs a piece with all hardware. I've used them as a pivot point and have laid the entire driver's side over on a rock. The tub is still perfectly straight and the corners needed some paint. Nothing more.


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