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-   -   Northern States Cars (http://www.wranglerforum.com/f19/northern-states-cars-13660.html)

Smeghead 12-01-2007 09:35 PM

Northern States Cars
 
Due to the weather and the roads being salty for large parts of the year in states like Illinois, Michigan etc, do cars in General rust alot underneath?
Im thinking of buying that Jeep in Chicago but the underside looks a little rusty and I was wondering if in general you should steer clear of "cold weather states" if possible for the salty roads reason.

Dare2BSquare 12-01-2007 10:02 PM

Go with a good ol southern car. You don't want no yankee sheet metal.

amy 12-01-2007 10:15 PM

PFFFFTTTT to Dare. :p

Not all northern states use salt on the roads. The midwest may but out here, we don't. Rust isn't any more of a problem for us than down in the humid south.

foxinthemudd 12-01-2007 10:17 PM

ya up here in oregon we use deicer liquid and gravel...

hutchman 12-01-2007 11:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by foxinthemudd (Post 165481)
ya up here in oregon we use deicer liquid and gravel...

Uhhhhhh, the deicer liquid is calcium chloride.........most chemists would tell you that is salt.

Not as corrosive as Sodium Chloride, but still salt.

HkdOnJP 12-01-2007 11:39 PM

hey i live in chicago wheres that jeep at i could take a look at it if you want

Smeghead 12-01-2007 11:43 PM

REALLY? wow that'd be awesome

Its at Exotic-Motors in Palatine

EXOTIC MOTORS
511 S. VERMONT ST.
PALATINE , IL 60067

Green Sahara
Now the auction has ended I bet I can get it cheap, the question is, is it ok enough to even bother with at all? If you live near there and could swing by that's be awesome!

Its this one again:


The underneath just looks kinda in a bad shape to me

foxinthemudd 12-01-2007 11:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hutchman (Post 165500)
Uhhhhhh, the deicer liquid is calcium chloride.........most chemists would tell you that is salt.

Not as corrosive as Sodium Chloride, but still salt.

ok smarty pants, your right it is salt but let me enlighten you a little on the stuff...:flipoff: Calcium chloride is an ionic compound of calcium and chlorine. It is highly soluble in water and it is deliquescent. It is a salt that is solid at room temperature, and it behaves as a typical ionic halide. It has several common applications such as brine for refrigeration plants, ice and dust control on roads, and in cement. It can be produced directly from limestone, but large amounts are also produced as a by-product of the Solvay process. Because of its hygroscopic nature, it must be kept in tightly-sealed containers. :flipoff:

hutchman 12-02-2007 01:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by foxinthemudd (Post 165520)
ok smarty pants, your right it is salt but let me enlighten you a little on the stuff...:flipoff: Calcium chloride is an ionic compound of calcium and chlorine. It is highly soluble in water and it is deliquescent. It is a salt that is solid at room temperature, and it behaves as a typical ionic halide. It has several common applications such as brine for refrigeration plants, ice and dust control on roads, and in cement. It can be produced directly from limestone, but large amounts are also produced as a by-product of the Solvay process. Because of its hygroscopic nature, it must be kept in tightly-sealed containers. :flipoff:

See I told you a chemist would tell you it is a salt..........

Not really trying to be a smart ass, but as you can see I tend to bring them out of the woods.........

I am impressed at your knowledge also..........but gee, it sure sounds to me like you just cut and pasted from Wikipedia:

http://www.wranglerforum.com/newrepl...reply&p=165520

Here is a cut and paste from the first paragraph from the link above....

Calcium chloride (CaCl2) is an ionic compound of calcium and chlorine. It is highly soluble in water and it is deliquescent. It is a salt that is solid at room temperature, and it behaves as a typical ionic halide. It has several common applications such as brine for refrigeration plants, ice and dust control on roads, and in cement. It can be produced directly from limestone, but large amounts are also produced as a by-product of the Solvay process. Because of its hygroscopic nature, it must be kept in tightly-sealed containers.

Hmmmmmmmmmmm, now who is the smart ass?

foxinthemudd 12-02-2007 02:03 AM

oh I will admit that I cut and pasted it and I will admit that I am a smart ass :D thats just the way I roll lol :flipoff:

too bad I wrote that in wikipedia :D
















...ya right

Smeghead 12-02-2007 02:40 AM

LOL
Pwned and Pwned back

I didnt mean to start 'Chemical Warfare'

Lets just call it ICEMELT from now on eh

foxinthemudd 12-02-2007 02:54 AM

its all good.

skeeter 12-02-2007 12:35 PM

Actually we use a solution of magnesium chloride and calcium lignosulfonate, it was specifically chosen for it's lack of rust promotion. Even with that we still use sand most of the time for traction control.
No matter the chemical makeup, Amy is still right, we don't suffer the rust problem you see back east because our government has chosen to address the problem rather than ignore it.

Odhinn 12-02-2007 01:21 PM

Good to see some northern states are getting away from Salt. Had a few winter drivers in high school without floorboards.:D

debruins 12-02-2007 02:31 PM

sounds liek my CJ5, it has a stop sign as the pass. floor board.

HkdOnJP 12-02-2007 02:40 PM

i dont have work tomorrow maybe ill check it out for ya....

pick 12-03-2007 01:50 PM

actually doesn't look that bad for being in the midwest.

jeeperman 12-03-2007 05:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by skeeter (Post 165683)
Actually we use a solution of magnesium chloride and calcium lignosulfonate, it was specifically chosen for it's lack of rust promotion. Even with that we still use sand most of the time for traction control.
No matter the chemical makeup, Amy is still right, we don't suffer the rust problem you see back east because our government has chosen to address the problem rather than ignore it.

Our State government isn't ignoring the problem, but there is LOTS more money in it for them if the cars fall apart faster (bottom 3 in the nation every year in road quality and TONS of salt on the roads every winter) because the big 3 all like to sell us cars!:mad:

AzTJ 12-03-2007 05:53 PM

ZERO rust in Arizona. :D :flipoff:

foxinthemudd 12-03-2007 09:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by skeeter (Post 165683)
Actually we use a solution of magnesium chloride and calcium lignosulfonate, it was specifically chosen for it's lack of rust promotion. Even with that we still use sand most of the time for traction control.
No matter the chemical makeup, Amy is still right, we don't suffer the rust problem you see back east because our government has chosen to address the problem rather than ignore it.

so does this mean I win??? :flipoff:

MOz 12-05-2007 08:01 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dare2BSquare (Post 165466)
Go with a good ol southern car. You don't want no yankee sheet metal.

I thought the war was over?

foxinthemudd 12-05-2007 08:55 AM

haven't you heard...its not over till the fat lady with the hummer sings :D

HkdOnJP 12-06-2007 04:59 PM

weather blew out here and my zippers on my soft upper windows wont close so im kinda stuck but i will get there to checkl it for you


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