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-   -   New recovery gear (Pictures) (http://www.wranglerforum.com/f282/new-recovery-gear-pictures-14042.html)

Darton 12-14-2007 06:37 PM

New recovery gear (Pictures)
 
Today I got my ol ford f-150 stuck in the mud, because it lied to me when it said it was in 4wd. Then when it finally fessed up it wouldn't shift into 4wd. The floor shifter feels like a brick wall. Anyway I needed to pull it out and with the new jeep whaT BETTER WAY TO HAVE SOME FUN AND GET SOME RECOVERY GEAR (CUZ I'LL NEED IT IN THE FUTURE, RIGHT?) I went to the local farmers Co-op and got the biggest tow strap they had. It's 4inch wide and 20ft long. Has no metal on the ends and is rated for 7000lbs. Is 7000lbs strong enough for wheelin or is there a stronger one I need? Also I looked for some D shackles and the Tractor supply co had some but they were only rated for 8000lbs so I didn't get them should I have gotten them??. I bought a hitch reciever made by Champion that has a shackle on it that is bigger than the other ones, but it dosen't have a rating marked on it. I know alot of you say that the reciever hitch is not a good pull point but it'll have to do for me untill I can get some bumpers. Is this shackle big enough or do I need bigger ones? In short is my new gear sufficant?? P.S. the truck drove out after I went and got the gear, so I can take it back if i need to.

http://i160.photobucket.com/albums/t...2/100_3141.jpg

http://i160.photobucket.com/albums/t...2/100_3140.jpg

If it gives you an idea of size, my ring is a size 12
http://i160.photobucket.com/albums/t...2/100_3142.jpg

Scout 12-14-2007 06:39 PM

A good rule of thumb is to get twice the amount you need. IE use a 10k strap for a 5k vehicle.

distortedtj 12-14-2007 09:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Scout (Post 171886)
A good rule of thumb is to get twice the amount you need. IE use a 10k strap for a 5k vehicle.


x2


i picked up a short 8ft strap rated @ 8000lbs for a tree saver, and a 25ft strap about 5in wide rated @ 30,000lbs. at a local hardware/tractor supply type store $45 for both. I know the 30,000 maybe "a little overkill":cool: But i wont have to worry if i have a big enofe strap.

:wavey:

sgnellett 12-14-2007 09:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by distortedtj (Post 171958)
x2


i picked up a short 8ft strap rated @ 8000lbs for a tree saver, and a 25ft strap about 5in wide rated @ 30,000lbs. at a local hardware/tractor supply type store $45 for both. I know the 30,000 maybe "a little overkill":cool: But i wont have to worry if i have a big enofe strap.

:wavey:

Plus, your Jeep can always use it for a tree swing if need be! :flipoff:

Heh-heh, overkill is kool!

http://i135.photobucket.com/albums/q...overkill-1.jpg

TeeJay 12-14-2007 09:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by distortedtj (Post 171958)
x2


i picked up a short 8ft strap rated @ 8000lbs for a tree saver, and a 25ft strap about 5in wide rated @ 30,000lbs. at a local hardware/tractor supply type store $45 for both. I know the 30,000 maybe "a little overkill":cool: But i wont have to worry if i have a big enofe strap.

:wavey:

When using a tow strap the actual forces applied are from the strap stretching and contracting. A 30,000lb strap with a wrangler might as well be a chain. It'll pull people out. but your jeeps going to have to do all the work.

It's like lifting everything with your back when you could've used your legs. It'll still move, but at what cost?

2x the vehicle weight is a very good rule to follow.

Off topic: Sng, how long have you been sitting on those photos? that's like the third one today.:wavey:

sgnellett 12-14-2007 09:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TeeJay (Post 171967)
Off topic: Sng, how long have you been sitting on those photos? that's like the third one today.:wavey:

I dumped about half of photobucket into my account the other day, I've got millions of 'em!

:rofl:

Darton 12-14-2007 09:21 PM

What about the shackles?? What kind of load rating??

nicolas-eric 12-14-2007 10:09 PM

all my recovery things are for +20,000 lbs, most are for 30,000 lbs.
some of my friends drive heavy landrovers, mercedes G and unimogs. with these heavy cars i need that much load.

and a light duty 8,000 lbs tow hook is a very bad idea. it is installed on the rear bumper with only a single little bolt. if this little bolt breaks the hook will fly away on the tow and something could be damaged or in the worst case it could injure or kill somebody.

don´t save money on recovery tools.

btw. it´s a hitch receiver that´s made for load that´s rolling on the ground. stuck in deep mud the same car would need much more load.

Darton 12-14-2007 10:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by nicolas-eric (Post 172000)
all my recovery things are for +20,000 lbs, most are for 30,000 lbs.
some of my friends drive heavy landrovers, mercedes G and unimogs. with these heavy cars i need that much load.

and a light duty 8,000 lbs tow hook is a very bad idea. it is installed on the rear bumper with only a single little bolt. if this little bolt breaks the hook will fly away on the tow and something could be damaged or in the worst case it could injure or kill somebody.

don´t save money on recovery tools.

btw. it´s a hitch receiver that´s made for load that´s rolling on the ground. stuck in deep mud the same car would need much more load.


The tow hook is way bigger than the 8000lb one that was at the store. Just not sure of the exact weight rating. I know that the reciever hitch isn't the best place to pull from but depending on the situation I can move to pull from the frame rail if I need to. Atleast untill I can get new bumpers which are by the way attached to the jeep just like a trailer hitch. So if we say that it's no good to pull from the hitch it also wouldn't be good to pull from a bumper.

nicolas-eric 12-14-2007 10:47 PM

a bumper isn´t the problem.
with a hitch the whole load is on only one single little bolt (in the red circle on the pic below). that´s the problem.

http://picr.de/upload/707096.jpg

Walkeraviator 12-15-2007 09:39 AM

nicolas is right...that pin is the weak link... the reciever hitch itself is as strong as a bumper no doubt. I would suggest wrapping a short tree saver around your bumper, then using a 15000lb shackle to connect it to your long strap. that would cover it big time.

EnigmaMan 12-15-2007 10:10 AM

If its a Class 3 hitch you should be good to go, prob a max of ~10,000lbs
However, a Class 2 Hitch has a max towing rate of ~3,500lbs.

If you do have a class 2 hitch, you might want to be careful attaching a tow strap to it because it "May" cause a sling shot effect. With that much force on the other end ot will cause a "rubber band" effect slinging the hitch towards the other vehicle... no good!

As far as a tow strap, Tractor supply sells a tow strap that I use for the jeep and the truck.. its a 3" x 20 foot and is rated for 27,000lbs. Aint nothing breaking that thing when doing a sling shot effect.

Remember, with tow Straps they are designed to be used (on most occasions) to create a "sling shot effect" where you can get a running head start and it will stretch up to ~25% before it reaches its full length and basically multiplys your inertia / pulling force to pull out the person that is stuck.

If even though your strap may be weighted for 5,000lbs if you get up to 5mph before the end of your strap, you may be exceeding that 5,000lb pulling capacity depending on how stuck they are. Just something to keep in mind.


http://www.tractorsupply.com/webapp/...51_10001_43892

Remember, just use common sense and be safe!

Darton 12-15-2007 10:23 AM

One thing that I have read is that straps with a high rating like 25000lbs aren't good for pulling light vehicles out like jeeps and buggies, because when you use the "sling shot effect" the vehicle dosent exert enough force to make the strap strech to it's full potential. Therefore not getting the right amout of pull out strenght and causing more strain than nessacery on the tow vehicle. Any thoughts on this theory??

parrot head 12-15-2007 11:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Walkeraviator (Post 172104)
nicolas is right...that pin is the weak link... the reciever hitch itself is as strong as a bumper no doubt. I would suggest wrapping a short tree saver around your bumper, then using a 15000lb shackle to connect it to your long strap. that would cover it big time.


I don't think using the stock bumper with a tree saver is a good idea. All it will net you is a badly bent bumper! The stock bumper is nothing but sheet metal. A class III receiver hitch (frame mounted) is much stronger. And as for the hitch pin, if you break that yor pulling too much. A 16d framing nail has a 30,000 lb shear strength and is only 1/8 inch diameter, my guess is that the hitch pin is at least thet strong. If yo are still worried about the hich pin, wrap the strap around the frame of the receiver hitch:D

Darton 12-15-2007 11:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by parrot head (Post 172136)
I don't think using the stock bumper with a tree saver is a good idea. All it will net you is a badly bent bumper! The stock bumper is nothing but sheet metal. A class III receiver hitch (frame mounted) is much stronger. And as for the hitch pin, if you break that yor pulling too much. A 16d framing nail has a 30,000 lb shear strength and is only 1/8 inch diameter, my guess is that the hitch pin is at least thet strong. If yo are still worried about the hich pin, wrap the strap around the frame of the receiver hitch:D

X2.... I think what he ment was to wrap the strap around the square tube of the hitch not the factory bumper. Also the hitch pis is 5/8 inch thick which is just as thick as most shackle pins. and the shackle pin is what bears most of the weight on a recovery pull.

EnigmaMan 12-15-2007 01:01 PM

Had a buddy that was stuck pretty bad on the side of the road once and used my Chevy 2500HD duramax.. put it in 4wd high. bring it up to ~2000rpm and let it rip (usually all 4 tires start spinning on concrete if i go any higher than that LOL) Its amazing what 850ft/lbs of tq will do w/ a stuck vehicle haha

Good call on the pin for the receiver hitch though.. makes sense on the sheer strength of it. Remember, its that shock force is when the Magic starts to happen and things can break :punk:. if its a smooth pull then you are much better off

debruins 12-15-2007 01:22 PM

heres my logic as to the recovery point on the hitch,
a lot fo people use winches that they can transfer formt eh fornt to the back and use a 2" hitcha s the receiver for it, so if it can pull with a winch formt here it should be fine if you doa nice ven smooth pull, just no jerking or anyhting!

distortedtj 12-15-2007 07:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TeeJay (Post 171967)
When using a tow strap the actual forces applied are from the strap stretching and contracting. A 30,000lb strap with a wrangler might as well be a chain. It'll pull people out. but your jeeps going to have to do all the work.

It's like lifting everything with your back when you could've used your legs. It'll still move, but at what cost?

2x the vehicle weight is a very good rule to follow.

Off topic: Sng, how long have you been sitting on those photos? that's like the third one today.:wavey:



I bought the strap when i had a 1 ton on 40's :D at the time it was what was safe to buy.Didn't see any reason to throw it away so it's the jeep strap now:wavey:

MR.CLIFFORD 12-15-2007 08:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by distortedtj (Post 172284)
I bought the strap when i had a 1 ton on 40's :D at the time it was what was safe to buy.Didn't see any reason to throw it away so it's the jeep strap now:wavey:

They can keep their weakling little straps. They won't do much good to pull anyone out when they are split in 2. I use a 27k rated strap. It has worked flawlessly for the past 4 years and never once did I think I should have got a smaller strap. :wavey:

nicolas-eric 12-15-2007 08:30 PM

cheap tires, cheap lockers, cheap suspensions are ok.
but with cheap and undersized recovery tools you can injure or kill other people.
that´s not a funny thing.
if this little pin breaks the hitch receiver becomes like a projectile.

i use 30.000 lbs (14 tons) recovery straps. and one strap broke when i was stuck in 2-3 feet deep mud and a friend tried to tow me out with his unimog 417.

MR.CLIFFORD 12-15-2007 08:36 PM

I trust the hitch pin more than I trust single shear bolts on the front tow hooks. I also trust that hitch pin to keep my junk on the back of my truck. I don't use the cheap push through with a little clip. I go for these so I know they won't come out of the receiver.

http://www.guidepointsystems.com/mal...V64912110_.jpg

For good measure you can see my recovery point well in this picture.

http://thedoubleduke.com/pics/Disney...dynosedive.jpg

MR.CLIFFORD 12-15-2007 08:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by nicolas-eric (Post 172302)
i use 30.000 lbs (14 tons) recovery straps.


Oh, and 30000 lbs = 15 tons. :wavey:

nicolas-eric 12-15-2007 08:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MR.CLIFFORD (Post 172304)
Oh, and 30000 lbs = 15 tons. :wavey:

my calculator says: 14 tons = 30,864 lbs

http://www.metric-conversions.org/we...etric-tons.htm

MR.CLIFFORD 12-15-2007 08:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by nicolas-eric (Post 172307)
my calculator says: 14 tons = 30,864 lbs

http://www.metric-conversions.org/we...etric-tons.htm

alright alright. We are both right. :rofl:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ton

"short ton (usually called simply ton, in the USA or sometimes called a net ton) = 2,000 lb (about 907.18474 kg)."

silvergoat 12-15-2007 09:03 PM

2000lbs per ton, 30000lbs =15 tons. And you will bend and break alot of other things before that hitch pin will break.

sgnellett 12-15-2007 09:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MR.CLIFFORD (Post 172304)
Oh, and 30000 lbs = 15 tons. :wavey:

He's using those metric tons!

silvergoat 12-15-2007 09:09 PM

So is a quarter pounder really a quarter pounder? Or are they not telling the truth at McDonalds?

nicolas-eric 12-15-2007 09:11 PM

i live in germany in the center of europe. everything is metric over here, except the damn bolts on my jeep... :rofl: :D




Long Tons (UK): A long ton is a British measurement and equivilent to 2,240 pounds. Not to be confused with the US "short ton".

Short Tons (US): United States measurement also known as a short ton that equals 2,000 pounds.

Metric Tons (or Tonnes): A unit of weight equal to 1,000 kilograms, or 2,204.6 pounds.

MR.CLIFFORD 12-15-2007 09:20 PM

Royale wit cheese!

jherrin215 12-15-2007 09:30 PM

I bet it is a pain to find some standard bolts in Germany!!


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