Jeep Wrangler Forum

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-   -   Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Towing (http://www.wranglerforum.com/f274/jeep-wrangler-unlimited-towing-144256.html)

bjellefs 03-05-2012 09:38 AM

Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Towing
 
Hi everyone. I am looking to get a new vehicle that can tow my boat. I have a 18.5 foot Glastron that weights 2,200 lbs dry and had a trailer weight of approximately 700-1000 lbs. I currently tow the boat with my old 99 jeep cherokee that is rated at 5000 lbs and it does ok. It is slow to accelerate but I haven't had any problems other than that.

I really like the new Jeep wrangler unlimited but I noticed that the towing capacity is only rated to 3,500 lbs. With my boat fully loaded and the trailer, I will be coming really close, if not slightly exceeding the the towing capability of the wrangler unlimited. I am curious if this would be a problem. Most of my towing trips are short 2 mile trips to and from the lake with one longer trips to my winter storage facility at the beginning and end of the year (about 60 miles).

The wrangler unlimited's 3,500 lb towing capacity seems strange to me since the wrangler is technically heavier and bigger than my current cherokee. Does anyone have any advice on this? If there are any glaring problems with this, I might just opt for the new FJ cruiser.

c0d3x5 03-05-2012 09:45 AM

i also have a 18.5 ft stingray boat.. i think gross weight of the boat and trailer come around 3750lbs.. i have no problems pulling the boat. infact it feels like it belongs back there... but i do have a 2012.. so i cant speak for anythign less than the 3.6l

daggo66 03-05-2012 10:06 AM

You should never exceed your vehicles rated towing capacity.

kik 03-05-2012 01:41 PM

You shouldn't exceed 3,500 lbs. It seems that it's mostly based upon the wheel base plus other factors that Chrysler doesn't seem to get into detail about. No one seems to address the gorilla in the room when it comes to JK's and towing. My 10 Rubi 2dr is a great vehicle but if I had to tow I can think of at least 5 other vehicles that I'd rather have if I was going to tow on a regular basis. Purchase a vehicle that best suites your needs. If it happens to not be a JK so be it, but I don't think an FJ will solve your problem either.

CapnRich22 03-05-2012 01:46 PM

hahhahhaha

BIG BOAT little jeep - YouTube

c0d3x5 03-05-2012 02:45 PM

u will be fine... just dont do whats going on in that video.. thats just a bad thing waiting to happen..

your jeep isnt going to flip backwards, and ur not going to drive on 2 wheels all day..
if your front end seems too lose to be consider safe, then ur too heavy in the rear
if it seems stable and your able to brake just fine.. go for it.. numbers are numbers.. if we listened to those all days, then the successful people of life would have never made it, cause all of them took a chance to become something. lol.. .

and once again i pull mine fine with no problems.. i guess i shouldnt be doing that cause the number say not to.. i pulled this same boat with a 88 ranger, 2.9l and had smaller axel and everything than the new jk's .. just do it... put a nike check on it!

daggo66 03-05-2012 02:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by c0d3x5 (Post 2105979)
u will be fine... just dont do whats going on in that video.. thats just a bad thing waiting to happen..

your jeep isnt going to flip backwards, and ur not going to drive on 2 wheels all day..
if your front end seems too lose to be consider safe, then ur too heavy in the rear
if it seems stable and your able to brake just fine.. go for it.. numbers are numbers.. if we listened to those all days, then the successful people of life would have never made it, cause all of them took a chance to become something. lol.. .

and once again i pull mine fine with no problems.. i guess i shouldnt be doing that cause the number say not to.. i pulled this same boat with a 88 ranger, 2.9l and had smaller axel and everything than the new jk's .. just do it... put a nike check on it!

You are giving really bad advice. If anything unforseen were to happen (accident) and someone was towing over the vehicle's rated capacity, they would be completely screwed.

bjellefs 03-05-2012 02:57 PM

Yea my gut tells me it would be OK just by doing a side by side comparison with my current Jeep Cherokee which tows the boat fine. The JK is Longer, wider, heavier, and has more HP and torque than my Cherokee. But I really am curious what the limiting factor is that warrants it the lower 3,500 lb capacity.

c0d3x5 03-05-2012 03:03 PM

it will blow up dont do it!

like he said.. it may be some bad advice, and i shouldnt say DO IT!

follow the "rules" of the manufacture numbers to the best of your knowledge..

drive at your own risk..


p.s nike check

bjellefs 03-05-2012 03:13 PM

Yea daggo, I didn't really think about insurance. If an accident did happen, I would be SOL. Probably best to go with a vehicle with 5,000 or better.

c0d3x5 03-05-2012 03:14 PM

sorry man

theotis 03-05-2012 06:06 PM

The new little Escape with a 4 cylinder Eco boost engine can tow 3500, but my JK can only tow 2,000. Go figure. My Isuzu Amigo with a 94 inch wheel base can tow 4500. My guess is Chrysler is risk adverse, but I still won't tow over the limit because I don't want the liability.

JkJared 03-05-2012 06:47 PM

Can the new JKUR pull it's own weight? Like tow another JKU behind or at least a
2dr... Even with the 285 HP and 260tq? If not that pretty butt hurt IMO and why can the fj with now about the same specs pull 5k? My ultimate question is did they change those nasty towing specs with the more powerful motor?

c0d3x5 03-05-2012 07:36 PM

i doubt it..

the actual "Towing" is never tested by the manufacture.. it never is.. its a computer simulated drawing of the vehicles specs, dyno runs, and suspension.. it has nothing to do with real life events.. the jeep can tow a hell of a lot more than advertised imo , but apparently i would be giving bad advise

sstan 03-05-2012 07:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by daggo66 (Post 2106005)
If anything unforseen were to happen (accident) and someone was towing over the vehicle's rated capacity, they would be completely screwed.


Daggo - please explain how he would be screwed. I'm not aware of any insurance denials due to being over the GVWR at least in the states.

This is a big topic in the truck camper world where I frequent. Basically GVWR is a factor of many things. Axle rating, suspension, brakes, wheels/ tires, etc. If his tongue weight is reasonable it should come down to braking ability. A trailer that size had better have electric brakes. If it were mine I'd go for it and in fact do regularly and safely. :whistling:

Steve

team38tim 03-05-2012 09:44 PM

I spoke with my dealer about this same issue. Towing a boat and trailer with a combined weight of 3700-3800lbs, the manager stated that it would not be an issue. He stated that if it were 5000lbs then yes there would be problems but given the fact that it was close to the 3500lb mark he stated there would not be a problem. I even asked about warranty if something were to break and he stated that it would be covered. My advise would be to speak with someone at the dealeship before making the purchase to get their input. Hope that helps.

dreg 03-05-2012 09:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by team38tim (Post 2107906)
I spoke with my dealer about this same issue. Towing a boat and trailer with a combined weight of 3700-3800lbs, the manager stated that it would not be an issue. He stated that if it were 5000lbs then yes there would be problems but given the fact that it was close to the 3500lb mark he stated there would not be a problem. I even asked about warranty if something were to break and he stated that it would be covered. My advise would be to speak with someone at the dealeship before making the purchase to get their input. Hope that helps.

I would wonder how this conversation would go if it was after the purchase. Just about anything will be said to sell something at times.

team38tim 03-05-2012 10:10 PM

I am friends with him, so I do believe what he said is true. Well let's ask this has anyone else towed more than the 3500lb limit with their 2012 JKU??? If so did it tow ok with no problems?

bjellefs I agree with you that it is a little odd that the towing capacity remains the same and yet the other Jeep products with the same penastar engine can tow 5000lbs.

daggo66 03-05-2012 10:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sstan (Post 2107164)
Daggo - please explain how he would be screwed. I'm not aware of any insurance denials due to being over the GVWR at least in the states.

This is a big topic in the truck camper world where I frequent. Basically GVWR is a factor of many things. Axle rating, suspension, brakes, wheels/ tires, etc. If his tongue weight is reasonable it should come down to braking ability. A trailer that size had better have electric brakes. If it were mine I'd go for it and in fact do regularly and safely. :whistling:

Steve

Well if you're not aware of it then it must be OK. :rolleyes: Does that include law suits?:whistling:

daggo66 03-05-2012 10:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JkJared (Post 2106878)
Can the new JKUR pull it's own weight? Like tow another JKU behind or at least a
2dr... Even with the 285 HP and 260tq? If not that pretty butt hurt IMO and why can the fj with now about the same specs pull 5k? My ultimate question is did they change those nasty towing specs with the more powerful motor?

HP has nothing to do with it. My 210 HP 08 Liberty with tow package is rated at 5k.

tropical36 03-05-2012 10:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bjellefs (Post 2104943)
Hi everyone. I am looking to get a new vehicle that can tow my boat. I have a 18.5 foot Glastron that weights 2,200 lbs dry and had a trailer weight of approximately 700-1000 lbs. I currently tow the boat with my old 99 jeep cherokee that is rated at 5000 lbs and it does ok. It is slow to accelerate but I haven't had any problems other than that.

I really like the new Jeep wrangler unlimited but I noticed that the towing capacity is only rated to 3,500 lbs. With my boat fully loaded and the trailer, I will be coming really close, if not slightly exceeding the the towing capability of the wrangler unlimited. I am curious if this would be a problem. Most of my towing trips are short 2 mile trips to and from the lake with one longer trips to my winter storage facility at the beginning and end of the year (about 60 miles).

The wrangler unlimited's 3,500 lb towing capacity seems strange to me since the wrangler is technically heavier and bigger than my current cherokee. Does anyone have any advice on this? If there are any glaring problems with this, I might just opt for the new FJ cruiser.

You really should stay within it's legal limits, even though I'm sure there's a fudge factor built in, but if everyone did that, then you wouldn't see 50% of them on the road. If you do decide to go for it, try and keep those 1000 mile runs someplace else other than the 6 and 7% grades of the Rockies, especially when going downhill. The main thing is to keep your speed down and don't be in a hurry.
I'm not about to advise anyone, except for that little bit, I'd go for it if it was me and can't believe what we used to tow with a Chevy car in the old days.
I'll probably be making a toad out of our JKU one of these days and already know I'll be towing more than the coach really allows and a lot like the majority of them on the road.

CapnRich22 03-06-2012 08:36 AM

this always helps too.. redistributing the weight and stabilizing it. Strait-Line Weight Distribution w Sway Control - Trunnion Bar - 10,000 lbs GTW, 600 lbs TW Reese Weight Distribution RP66072

c0d3x5 03-06-2012 10:02 AM

my boat says its 2700lbs dry and the trailer is 1000lbs even.. i have no problems pulling my boat..

pat@fieldsauto.com 03-06-2012 12:26 PM

Info I found about towing and the warranty

Warranty
The Manufacturer’s Passenger Vehicle Warranty will apply to vehicles used to tow trailers for non-commercial use. However, the following conditions must be met:

The maximum trailer frontal-area rating cannot be exceeded
The maximum trailer load should not be exceeded
On Chrysler Group LLC vehicles equipped with 4-speed automatic transaxles, the “D” range can be selected when towing. If frequent shifting occurs while in this range, the “3” range MUST be selected. On vehicles equipped with AutoStick,® manually shift the gears but do not shift into fourth gear (fifth gear on 5-speed AutoStick transmissions)

pat@fieldsauto.com 03-06-2012 12:29 PM

How To Job Rate
Some uninformed buyers believe that any vehicle can tow any trailer. But this is not the case. There are numerous factors that have to be taken into consideration when recommending a vehicle for trailer towing. Otherwise, the buyer may find his/her vehicle struggling to get up a hill with a trailer being pulled by an inadequate drivetrain, or losing control of the vehicle because of improper weight distribution, or breaking down because of overloading. Whatever the case, you can help buyers make the right vehicle purchase decision based on their trailering needs.

Determining Trailer Weight
There is a maximum trailer weight that a vehicle can pull depending on a vehicle’s size and drivetrain. Therefore, it is necessary for your customer to provide the loaded weight (and frontal area) of the trailer that will be hitched to their vehicle. In most cases, the trailer manufacturer will supply the GTWR.

When specifying a trailer-tow vehicle, you need to determine the total loaded weight of a trailer. Guessing won’t do because there’s a possibility you may underestimate the total weight, which could cause numerous problems. The safest method is to use the GTWR, even if the customer currently does not tow at the fully loaded capacity. If the trailer is ever fully loaded in the future, the vehicle will be capable of hauling the load.

Tongue Weight
Trailer tongue weight (TW) is described as the downward force exerted on the tow vehicle’s hitch ball by the trailer tongue coupler. In most cases, the trailer tongue weight on a drawbar should not be less than 10 percent or more than 15 percent of the trailer load.

Placing too much weight on a trailer hitch can damage suspension and driveline components of the vehicle, while too little weight can cause the rear end of the tow vehicle to lift — thereby reducing a vehicle’s rear-wheel traction, which can cause trailer sway or jackknifing. Special care should be taken to ensure the trailer load weight is distributed correctly. Proper weight distribution affects tongue weight and trailer handling.

Combining Vehicle and Trailer Weights
When selecting a vehicle to meet your customer’s towing needs, you will need to know the loaded gross vehicle weight (GVW) of the tow vehicle (without the trailer tongue weight), as well as the loaded gross weight of the trailer (GTW). Their combined weight is called the gross combination weight (GCW). Here’s the formula:

GVW + GTW = GCW

Just like the maximum weight rating of a trailer, there is a maximum combined weight rating given to vehicles designed to pull a trailer. This measurement is called the gross combination weight rating (GCWR), and it’s used to establish a vehicle’s safe towing limit.

When choosing a vehicle that will be hauling a trailer, you will have to determine the GCW of the vehicle and loaded trailer and then compare it with the GCWR of the vehicle. Doing this is easy:

Determine the GVW of the vehicle (with tongue weight).
Add this to the GTW to determine the GCW of the vehicle and trailer.
Make sure the GCW doesn’t exceed the GCWR of the vehicle.

pkmcd99 03-06-2012 12:54 PM

Glad I got my cdl. Wont worry bout all the math in the Jeep. Ill just jump in the frieghtliner : P

JustMike 03-14-2012 03:08 PM

Maybe I'm not reading something right, but on the Canadian Jeep.ca website it lists the GVWR for the Sahara at 5337lbs and the Rubicon at 5448Lbs when you build it!Where's the 3500lbs you guys are talking about?

daggo66 03-14-2012 03:10 PM

Towing capacity.

tropical36 03-14-2012 04:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JustMike (Post 2140044)
Maybe I'm not reading something right, but on the Canadian Jeep.ca website it lists the GVWR for the Sahara at 5337lbs and the Rubicon at 5448Lbs when you build it!Where's the 3500lbs you guys are talking about?

You should be able to find about anything you want to know along these lines by clicking here..... The 2007-2010 Jeep Wrangler
There's a link on the page that will switch you over to the unlimited versions as well.

strider_mt2k 03-14-2012 06:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pat@fieldsauto.com (Post 2110020)
How To Job Rate
Some uninformed buyers believe that any vehicle can tow any trailer. But this is not the case. There are numerous factors that have to be taken into consideration when recommending a vehicle for trailer towing. Otherwise, the buyer may find his/her vehicle struggling to get up a hill with a trailer being pulled by an inadequate drivetrain, or losing control of the vehicle because of improper weight distribution, or breaking down because of overloading. Whatever the case, you can help buyers make the right vehicle purchase decision based on their trailering needs.

Determining Trailer Weight
There is a maximum trailer weight that a vehicle can pull depending on a vehicle’s size and drivetrain. Therefore, it is necessary for your customer to provide the loaded weight (and frontal area) of the trailer that will be hitched to their vehicle. In most cases, the trailer manufacturer will supply the GTWR.

When specifying a trailer-tow vehicle, you need to determine the total loaded weight of a trailer. Guessing won’t do because there’s a possibility you may underestimate the total weight, which could cause numerous problems. The safest method is to use the GTWR, even if the customer currently does not tow at the fully loaded capacity. If the trailer is ever fully loaded in the future, the vehicle will be capable of hauling the load.

Tongue Weight
Trailer tongue weight (TW) is described as the downward force exerted on the tow vehicle’s hitch ball by the trailer tongue coupler. In most cases, the trailer tongue weight on a drawbar should not be less than 10 percent or more than 15 percent of the trailer load.

Placing too much weight on a trailer hitch can damage suspension and driveline components of the vehicle, while too little weight can cause the rear end of the tow vehicle to lift — thereby reducing a vehicle’s rear-wheel traction, which can cause trailer sway or jackknifing. Special care should be taken to ensure the trailer load weight is distributed correctly. Proper weight distribution affects tongue weight and trailer handling.

Combining Vehicle and Trailer Weights
When selecting a vehicle to meet your customer’s towing needs, you will need to know the loaded gross vehicle weight (GVW) of the tow vehicle (without the trailer tongue weight), as well as the loaded gross weight of the trailer (GTW). Their combined weight is called the gross combination weight (GCW). Here’s the formula:

GVW + GTW = GCW

Just like the maximum weight rating of a trailer, there is a maximum combined weight rating given to vehicles designed to pull a trailer. This measurement is called the gross combination weight rating (GCWR), and it’s used to establish a vehicle’s safe towing limit.

When choosing a vehicle that will be hauling a trailer, you will have to determine the GCW of the vehicle and loaded trailer and then compare it with the GCWR of the vehicle. Doing this is easy:

Determine the GVW of the vehicle (with tongue weight).
Add this to the GTW to determine the GCW of the vehicle and trailer.
Make sure the GCW doesn’t exceed the GCWR of the vehicle.

It is the reasoned informed input of members like this that I became a supporter of this place.

Thanks man.


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