Jeep Wrangler Forum

Jeep Wrangler Forum (http://www.wranglerforum.com/)
-   JK General Discussion Forum (http://www.wranglerforum.com/f274/)
-   -   Do we still have to warm up our JKs? (http://www.wranglerforum.com/f274/do-we-still-have-to-warm-up-our-jks-202152.html)

LMT Rubi 11-27-2012 11:58 PM

Do we still have to warm up our JKs?
 
14 Attachment(s)
Hi gang,

My father always taught me to warm up my vehicles prior to driving off. However with today's technology I am wondering if this is still a necessary thing to do. Would I harm the motor or any other components if I drove it off without warming it up?

Thank you in advance!

MUEngineer 11-28-2012 12:02 AM

Modern vehicles don't require warming up to be driven partially due to the advanced oils they use in cars today vs. decades ago.

Once you've turned the key and the engine is idling, you can take off.

If you lived somewhere so cold that the oil wouldn't be able to remain at the correct viscosity to simply start and go, your car would have been sold with an engine block heater to keep the oil warm when its not running.

Now if you want to be warm, you might want to let the temperature gauge move off cold before you start driving.

Moabrubi 11-28-2012 12:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LMT Rubi (Post 3041584)
Hi gang,

My father always taught me to warm up my vehicles prior to driving off. However with today's technology I am wondering if this is still a necessary thing to do. Would I harm the motor or any other components if I drove it off without warming it up?

Thank you in advance!

I don't think it's necessary, it's not like they are carbureted. Giving the oil enough time to get circulated and driving easy until its warmed up is good enough.

LMT Rubi 11-28-2012 12:07 AM

14 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by MUEngineer (Post 3041594)
Modern vehicles don't require warming up to be driven partially due to the advanced oils they use in cars today vs. decades ago.

Once you've turned the key and the engine is idling, you can take off.

If you lived somewhere so cold that the oil wouldn't be able to remain at the correct viscosity to simply start and go, your car would have been sold with an engine block heater to keep the oil warm when its not running.

Now if you want to be warm, you might want to let the temperature gauge move off cold before you start driving.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Moabrubi (Post 3041595)
I don't think it's necessary, it's not like they are carbureted. Giving the oil enough time to get circulated and driving easy until
its warmed up is good enough.


Thank you guys! I have been warming up my vehicles almost all my life. I feel I have been robed of many minutes every morning :redface:

dipstickinva 11-28-2012 12:37 AM

Just thing about all the gas u could of saved.

Dusthol 11-28-2012 01:52 AM

Since most jeeps don't come w a block heater we shouldnt live in cold climates? A block heater is an option. What about the people that moved to the cold area after buying a vehicle and not knowing about block heaters? I would say yes to warming up ur jeep. I do it. I also warm up my work trucks. More so in the cold months than summer.

SilverSport 11-28-2012 02:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dusthol (Post 3041798)
Since most jeeps don't come w a block heater we shouldnt live in cold climates? A block heater is an option. What about the people that moved to the cold area after buying a vehicle and not knowing about block heaters? I would say yes to warming up ur jeep. I do it. I also warm up my work trucks. More so in the cold months than summer.

You choose to let your vehicles warm up, but it isn't a requirement.

Dollar 11-28-2012 05:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dusthol
Since most jeeps don't come w a block heater we shouldnt live in cold climates? A block heater is an option. What about the people that moved to the cold area after buying a vehicle and not knowing about block heaters? I would say yes to warming up ur jeep. I do it. I also warm up my work trucks. More so in the cold months than summer.

Funny story. My Grand Cherokee was ordered by the dealership with an engine block heater. In Texas! LOL!

Lucy Brown 11-28-2012 05:49 AM

I dont believe it was ever neccesary to warm up an engine unless you are doing it for heat inside the cabin. As soon as oil gets pumped by the oil pump,which takes a second or two you are good to go.

igivup 11-28-2012 05:57 AM

Well I live in a climate where -40 is all too frequent, and although the block heater, and the fact that the aluminum blocks do reach a working temperature much faster than the engines of old, there is still the fact that all the other fluids are still COLD. Warming up a cold engine is also better for steering fluid, and tranny fluid. Clutches, gears , and bearings all benefit from a little idling time in severe conditions. In my opinion. It can be very hard to shift with cold parts and fluids, even in automatics.

Wharfrat 11-28-2012 06:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by igivup (Post 3042070)
Well I live in a climate where -40 is all too frequent, and although the block heater, and the fact that the aluminum blocks do reach a working temperature much faster than the engines of old, there is still the fact that all the other fluids are still COLD. Warming up a cold engine is also better for steering fluid, and tranny fluid. Clutches, gears , and bearings all benefit from a little idling time in severe conditions. In my opinion. It can be very hard to shift with cold parts and fluids, even in automatics.

This is true. Even in a mild(er) climate, I let mine idle for a minute or two before driving slowly.

Also everyone needs to bear in mind that what is being discussed is "easy" driving when cold. You do not mash the gas, redline the engine, give the vehicle any "severe" type of use, etc. At least not until the oil temperature has come up, which is usually several minutes after the engine reaches full operating temperature.

panthermark 11-28-2012 06:36 AM

The OP is is southern Cali...not Alaska...

When it is really cold out, I basically warm my vehicles up for 2 to 4 minutes. Open door, turn on engine, close door, scrape windows, get back in, drive away.

WXman 11-28-2012 06:47 AM

My opinion is to ALWAYS let the engine warm up for a minute or two before getting on the throttle hard when the temperature is below freezing. This does not mean that you can't drive it...but do not get on the throttle hard until the engine is warm. You need to give the oil time to heat up a little so it can do it's job. That does NOT happen in 10 seconds time.

My brother blew a hole in both sides of his engine block two years ago because on a cold night when 3rd shift at his job was over, he jumped in the truck and took off down the interstate. BOOM. Rods came right out the sides of the block.

Let the oil warm up for a minute or two and thin out a little so it can flow well, then you're ready to go.

Jackster3 11-28-2012 07:09 AM

I will always warm up my vehicles. Especially in the northeast winters. Engines werent meant to run cold. If they were we wouldnt be burning fuels

lolpetewtf 11-28-2012 08:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jackster3 (Post 3042216)
I will always warm up my vehicles. Especially in the northeast winters. Engines werent meant to run cold. If they were we wouldnt be burning fuels

huh lol? :blunt::rofl2:

Jackster3 11-28-2012 08:11 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lolpetewtf (Post 3042341)
huh lol? :blunt::rofl2:

what?!?!? lol

lolpetewtf 11-28-2012 08:19 AM

The whole "burning fuel" thing is throwing me off >.<

Jackster3 11-28-2012 08:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lolpetewtf (Post 3042359)
The whole "burning fuel" thing is throwing me off >.<

Burning fuel creates heat. Engines are engineered to be hot when running. So if they were engineered to run warm/hot why bother running them cold?

Maybe thats just my thinking and im nutz but if something is made to run hot then run it hot.

charslo 11-28-2012 08:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by panthermark (Post 3042121)
The OP is is southern Cali...not Alaska...

When it is really cold out, I basically warm my vehicles up for 2 to 4 minutes. Open door, turn on engine, close door, scrape windows, get back in, drive away.

x2
usually have it plugged in when it starts getting down to -15 though :rolleyes:

i think if your somewhere it stays at a good temp.. say the lowest you get is 0... i wouldn't spend the money on the block heater or bother warming'er up.. absolutely no reason to.

lolpetewtf 11-28-2012 08:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jackster3 (Post 3042365)
Burning fuel creates heat. Engines are engineered to be hot when running. So if they were engineered to run warm/hot why bother running them cold?

Maybe thats just my thinking and im nutz but if something is made to run hot then run it hot.

I understand how an engine works, but for a second I thought you meant something else. Forget it lolll

Jackster3 11-28-2012 08:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lolpetewtf (Post 3042396)
I understand how an engine works, but for a second I thought you meant something else. Forget it lolll

lol is that why you had the smiley burning a fatty? :whistling:

Spool 11-28-2012 08:49 AM

I always start my car/jeep and let it idle for a few seconds, then just slowly drive off, i never go more than 30% throttle until the needle is at the operating temperature...got 250K miles out of my 92 corolla that way...


worst thing you can do is let the car warm up and idle for 10 minute plus...

Ltblue 11-28-2012 09:41 AM

I always wait till the rpm goes under the 1

lolpetewtf 11-28-2012 09:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jackster3 (Post 3042410)
lol is that why you had the smiley burning a fatty? :whistling:

LOL at this point I could use a fatty!


Quote:

Originally Posted by Ltblue (Post 3042635)
I always wait till the rpm goes under the 1

Same here, then shift super early through gears.

kik 11-28-2012 09:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by igivup (Post 3042070)
Well I live in a climate where -40 is all too frequent, and although the block heater, and the fact that the aluminum blocks do reach a working temperature much faster than the engines of old, there is still the fact that all the other fluids are still COLD. Warming up a cold engine is also better for steering fluid, and tranny fluid. Clutches, gears , and bearings all benefit from a little idling time in severe conditions. In my opinion. It can be very hard to shift with cold parts and fluids, even in automatics.

Under those circumstances I would due to the extreme situation. Under more "normal" cold temps 30 sec. to a minute is enough. Not many see -40 as a steady diet.

davefr 11-28-2012 10:03 AM

Slowly warming up a cold engine is a terrible thing to do. You want the engine to come up to it's operating temperature as quickly as possible. That reduces wears and burns off condensation and the byproducts of combustion more efficiently.

In addition a cold idling engine wastes fuel.

lolpetewtf 11-28-2012 10:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by davefr (Post 3042714)
Slowly warming up a cold engine is a terrible thing to do. You want the engine to come up to it's operating temperature as quickly as possible. That reduces wears and burns off condensation and the byproducts of combustion more efficiently.

In addition a cold idling engine wastes fuel.

You could make an argument either way. Everyone do what you think works best!

Toklas 11-28-2012 10:32 AM

ok so i agree that its probably not as important as it used to be to warm up an engine, but... here are my thoughts.

as a previous poster mentioned an engine is designed to run hot. all the metal parts expand when hot so it stands to reason that when it is not at operating temp that all the metal parts are in a contracted state which can cause a bit more wear and tear.

also anyone notice that when you first start the vehicle the computer revs the engine up a bit to try and warm it up. then as the temp comes up it slowly backs down on the rpms? why would it do that if warming up the engine wasnt important? or is it doing it for another reason?

again i don't know i'm a creature of habit and its what i was taught many years ago lol so i sit in my drive way and listen to tunes....

109 Rider 11-28-2012 11:04 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by igivup (Post 3042070)
Well I live in a climate where -40 is all too frequent, and although the block heater, and the fact that the aluminum blocks do reach a working temperature much faster than the engines of old, there is still the fact that all the other fluids are still COLD. Warming up a cold engine is also better for steering fluid, and tranny fluid. Clutches, gears , and bearings all benefit from a little idling time in severe conditions. In my opinion. It can be very hard to shift with cold parts and fluids, even in automatics.

X 2
I always wait for RPM to drop before I take of.
Even with all synthetic oil and fluids (which do not change viscosity until is way below - 40 F). Did a test with Mobil 1 - 15 years ago. It was very cold night in Chicago, and temps. dropped below - 20 F. Let one bottle of Mobil 1 overnight outside. In the morning I opened that bottle and poured out the oil. It was almost like water. Exactly as it should be. Did not thicken at all. Ever since - I stay with Mobil 1.

1quick1 11-28-2012 11:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 109 Rider (Post 3042916)
X 2
I always wait for RPM to drop before I take of.

This. And on the 3.6 it doesn't take long.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:45 AM.


User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging v3.1.0 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2016 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2016 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.