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-   -   Learning to weld?! (http://www.wranglerforum.com/f118/learning-to-weld-234297.html)

Milspec1 04-10-2013 06:48 AM

Between my wife's Mustang GT and the Jeep I don't have yet, I've really wanted to learn to weld...especially after being inspired by the "let's see your welds" thread.

Any advice for a 30-something, 40 hour per week cubicle worker learning to weld on the weekend? DVDs? Internet?...

I've been looking at welders online, curious to what most folks have in their garage and what kind of electrical power is required?

jerryj 04-10-2013 08:56 AM

Lincoln or Miller are great welders,get a 220 welder you cant do much at all with 110.Mine came with a dvd and theres welding classes you can watch on you tube and even help to decide which is right for you.I got the lincoln weld pak from Home Depo for 700$ or so you can use gas or flux.

Milspec1 04-10-2013 09:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jerryj (Post 3618705)
Lincoln or Miller are great welders,get a 220 welder you cant do much at all with 110.Mine came with a dvd and theres welding classes you can watch on you tube and even help to decide which is right for you.I got the lincoln weld pak from Home Depo for 700$ or so you can use gas or flux.

Great info, I appreciate it!

Dusty Rhodes 04-10-2013 05:31 PM

The BEST way to learn is a local trade school or community college. They often offer brief, hobbyist courses. While it is possible to learn on your own or via someone who knows how to weld, nothing compares to a certified teacher in a learning environment.
I learned that way and we started out with oxy/fuel (oxygen accetelyne) because you need to be able to "see" the puddle of molten metal and understand what to do with it.
"Pretty" welds are not always strong welds. And stout, sturdy welds are not always pretty. They can be pretty but they may not have the "stack of dimes" look.
There are DVDs and utube type clips that will help but a course is the best way, without a doubt.
See my post on this forum about first time MIG machines.

George C 04-10-2013 08:34 PM

a stout weld when dont right, will look pretty

a shitty weld will always look shitty

a cold weld can look ok to many ppl but not to a ceritifed welder


best thing to say is get ahold of a person who can actually show you how to run a bead. theres alot to it and many dont grasp the concept, some just make metal partially stick together well others make it look simple.

those classes will help you with the basics but it takes alot of seat time to get good. good eye sight, good general concept, and alot of control is very important

ALjeep 04-11-2013 11:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dusty Rhodes (Post 3620609)
The BEST way to learn is a local trade school or community college. They often offer brief, hobbyist courses. While it is possible to learn on your own or via someone who knows how to weld, nothing compares to a certified teacher in a learning environment.
I learned that way and we started out with oxy/fuel (oxygen accetelyne) because you need to be able to "see" the puddle of molten metal and understand what to do with it.
"Pretty" welds are not always strong welds. And stout, sturdy welds are not always pretty. They can be pretty but they may not have the "stack of dimes" look.
There are DVDs and utube type clips that will help but a course is the best way, without a doubt.
See my post on this forum about first time MIG machines.

I agree, the last thing you want is a weld failing that can endanger yourself or others. If you're just tacking stuff together, that's one thing but dont attempt structural type welds such as trailer hitches or axles. I've see shadetree weld failures on hitches. Last thing you want is your trailer passing you up:eek:

Milspec1 04-11-2013 07:05 PM

All really good info, thanks everyone! We have several community colleges around, I'll scope out their courses.

GoldenSahara00 04-12-2013 02:35 PM

https://www.youtube.com/user/weldingtipsandtricks

I have watched some of his videos back when I started. There was another good one but I couldn't find it. I stick weld. So find something about whatever machine you are using, learn why and how the weld process actually works, what can cause a weld to fail, what it should look like, the angle and speed and technique that you should use, and get to practicing.

Sebastian F7 04-21-2013 09:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dusty Rhodes (Post 3620609)
The BEST way to learn is a local trade school or community college. They often offer brief, hobbyist courses. While it is possible to learn on your own or via someone who knows how to weld, nothing compares to a certified teacher in a learning environment.
I learned that way and we started out with oxy/fuel (oxygen accetelyne) because you need to be able to "see" the puddle of molten metal and understand what to do with it.
"Pretty" welds are not always strong welds. And stout, sturdy welds are not always pretty. They can be pretty but they may not have the "stack of dimes" look.
There are DVDs and utube type clips that will help but a course is the best way, without a doubt.
See my post on this forum about first time MIG machines.

A community college is ok you will learn a lot, with that being said your best bet is to find someone who is a good welder that can show you whats what and is willing to hold your hand for a while. (literally if necessary)
I have a degree in welding and 3 certs. BFD in the real fab world. It means jack. The only way to learn is to do.
Ive never worked in a shop that had perfect circumstances like the school. Many times the welders dont run quite right etc.
Ive learned way more welding since out of school.
Now welding theory is another story.

Flux Cored machines that dont run Dual Shield are garbage IMO. I wouldnt run one on ANY critical structural weld.

This is just MY .02 take it for what its worth.


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