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-   -   Changing Diff Fluid and Greasing (http://www.wranglerforum.com/f274/changing-diff-fluid-and-greasing-235352.html)

rguy01 04-14-2013 09:26 PM

Changing Diff Fluid and Greasing
 
Hi, I have a 2011 Wrangler sport. I went mudding recently and have read that you should change your diff fluid and grease up your jeep after. Im new to jeeps so I dont know much. What fluid do I put in the diff's, and what type of grease should I use. I have youtubed how to change the diff fluid and it looks pretty simple. Although, I am wondering what parts I need to grease.

Thanks,
Riley

bvanfossen 04-14-2013 09:47 PM

You only need to change diff fluid at recommended intervals or unless you have water in them- the oil would be milky.

I grease fittings every oil change for longevity. :thumbs:

rguy01 04-14-2013 09:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bvanfossen (Post 3637512)
You only need to change diff fluid at recommended intervals or unless you have water in them- the oil would be milky.

I grease fittings every oil change for longevity. :thumbs:

How do I know if I got water in them? I did go through some deep mud/water holes a few times just want to take all the precautions of keeping my jeep in good condition.

Also, what all parts do I need to grease, and what grease would you recommend?

Raziel 04-15-2013 08:29 AM

As a safety after going through deep water, they recommends changing the fluids in case it does have water. It should look milky, but you probably should change it regardless of how it looks to be on the safe side. $10s of dollors for fluids is better than a while new drive system!

wrangler0 04-15-2013 08:51 AM

From what I've read, there's nothing to grease on a stock jeep. No zerks.

kjeeper10 04-15-2013 08:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wrangler0 (Post 3638920)
From what I've read, there's nothing to grease on a stock jeep. No zerks.

Yep

rguy01 04-15-2013 06:11 PM

Does anybody know what type of fluid it takes?

MercMan 04-15-2013 06:16 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Did it yesterday for the first time myself. Very easy and used about 3 litres total. 2 in the back and 1 in the front. This stuff. I notice the pic I posted says for motorcycles etc. Not sure if there is a difference but make sure you buy the right stuff. I know I used HYPOY C for mine.

Hammerstien 04-15-2013 06:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rguy01 (Post 3640727)
Does anybody know what type of fluid it takes?

I believe 80w90. Nothing to grease on stock parts. I wouldn't even go crazy with changing the fluid after a little water. Unless its sandy water. Your axle seals should hold up ok. I would just change at scheduled maintenance. Read your manual

rguy01 04-15-2013 08:03 PM

Do stock JK's have limited slip differentials? I was watching a youtube video and it said to check if you do, because you might need to add an additive for it.

joe002 04-15-2013 09:53 PM

Yum... :)

http://www.valvoline.com/admin/p59.png

NFRs2000NYC 04-15-2013 10:44 PM

Whats the correct fluid for a 2012 sahara? The manual I think states 85-90 but the pics above show 75-90. Any advice?

COStrider 04-15-2013 11:03 PM

2 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by nfrs2000nyc
whats the correct fluid for a 2012 sahara? The manual i think states 85-90 but the pics above show 75-90. Any advice?


rear:
Attachment 236759

front
Attachment 236761

joe002 04-15-2013 11:13 PM

If you don't tow then 75w90 is good.

river2c 04-15-2013 11:14 PM

The 85W-90 is conventional gear oil. The 75W-90 and 75W-140 are synthetic gear oils. Any of them will work fine in the JK differentials (clutch-type limited slips require synthetic gear oil or a LS additive to the conventional oil).

legitposter 04-15-2013 11:39 PM

Whatever you do don't use Amsoil. It's old school and not made for today's tight tolerance components. Even engines can have their warranties void if amsoil is used.

COStrider 04-15-2013 11:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by legitposter
Whatever you do don't use Amsoil. It's old school and not made for today's tight tolerance components. Even engines can have their warranties void if amsoil is used.

That's all they run at the shop I go to. Guess there are a bunch of ticking time bombs out there?!

xjrguy 04-16-2013 01:04 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by legitposter (Post 3642215)
Whatever you do don't use Amsoil. It's old school and not made for today's tight tolerance components. Even engines can have their warranties void if amsoil is used.

Nowhere near the galaxy called "accurate".

Do you have any credible citations to back those statements up?

:popcorn:

somis 04-16-2013 02:28 AM

Yea I have a hard time believing that Amsoil is not a quality product. I know they make quality products motocross and street bikes, I dont understand how a company of that stature wouldnt keep up their R&D program to compete in the auto industry

somis 04-16-2013 02:38 AM

I just did some research on this Amsoil topic, and everyone from Corvette guys with LS3's to rally racers, many people swear by their product and recommend it over Royal Purple. Personally I'll run Mobil 1 synthetic because its readily available at my Napa, but I would like to support Amsoil because they are a smaller company and have put on many motocross events.

NFRs2000NYC 04-16-2013 08:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by legitposter (Post 3642215)
Whatever you do don't use Amsoil. It's old school and not made for today's tight tolerance components. Even engines can have their warranties void if amsoil is used.

Im sorry, but what are you talking about? In ANY test, for ANY fluid, Amsoil fluids are bar none the best in the industry. The only gear oil as good as Amsoil is LE Engineering. Old school? Warranties void? don't spread misinformation.

NFRs2000NYC 04-16-2013 08:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by xjrguy (Post 3642479)
Nowhere near the galaxy called "accurate".

Do you have any credible citations to back those statements up?

:popcorn:

No he does not because I have proof of exactly the opposite, that in EVERY test (with the exception of the arctic temp shear test where it came in 2nd) Amsoil is #1.

enjerhoo 04-16-2013 09:53 AM

LOL

LOL

AMSOIL the worst in the business eh?

LOL

Ummm,,, wrong.

How about some Penzoil 10W40 in the engine too. They have race cars in their commercials so that will make it last.

My RR wheel bearing went out after 18K (warantee) & the dealer was nice enough to not change the diff fluid while recommending their $250 diff treatment "package." Thanks LHM. High quality warantee work. Anyone ever hear of changing a wheel bearing & not changing the fluid / repacking? Maybe I'll try running a bearing right out of the box without greasing on my next brake job. That should do the trick. Oh yeah, & the dealer said that the front diff fluid had to be changed at the same time & my nice red p/s fluid needed to be changed too (service interval anyone). Interesting that the chalk mark on the oil fill & drain were still there on the front diff. Hmmmmm. I had no idea that I resembled a 16 year old little girl driving daddy's Jeep. My hairline would tend to disagree.

So I immediately went down to the local Amsoil outlet & picked up some 75 140 (since I tow occasionally) with the additive. I did it myself for about $80 the following day when their "membership" was included. (front was still nice & clean too btw but somehow I could not get the chalk marks to line back up perfectly)

That specific weight fluid has to be changed a little more frequently but is better under towing conditions.

Amsoil sucks :rofl::rofl::rofl:, Oil membership :rofl::rofl::rofl:

Not changing fluid with a fried bearing :nonono::nonono::nonono:

rguy01 04-16-2013 09:34 PM

Can someone answer the question on whether or not a stock 2011 wrangler has a limited slip diff or not?

Ridge Rider 04-16-2013 10:21 PM

Rguy01, I believe it is an option. Do you have your window sticker spec sheet, it will tell you. Mine is a 2010 but it was a option I choose.

JKralph 04-16-2013 10:26 PM

and if you don't have your window sticker, you can go to the jeep website, and up in the top right hand corner there is a drop menu titled "owners"

set up an account (it's free) and type in your vin #, and you can access your build sheet, everything that was put into your particular wrangler when it left the factory floor.

if worse comes to worst, you can always pop your rear diff cover off and take a look-see

crawlin_archer 04-16-2013 10:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by joe002 (Post 3642099)
If you don't tow then 75w90 is good.

I prefer 75w-140 due to the fact that we normally have modifications like larger tires & tend to use them offroad under more extreme conditions.

And the deal with water & mud then changing your fluid is because if the fluid & internals are real hot then submerged under water, the rapid cooling effect makes the pressure drop on the inside causing a vacuum type effect. And this vacuum can draw water into the housing thru axle seals or pinion seals. To check it, take the fill plug off & stick your finger in & see if the oil looks liek it has water in it. If you've been doing like a whole weekend of wheeling in deep mud & water for long periods of time, I would change it for peace of mind.

MarcelOrtiz 04-16-2013 11:06 PM

What do I use on a rear and front diffs of a 07 rubi?? Ocacional towing

joe002 04-16-2013 11:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by crawlin_archer (Post 3646409)
I prefer 75w-140 due to the fact that we normally have modifications like larger tires & tend to use them offroad under more extreme conditions.

And the deal with water & mud then changing your fluid is because if the fluid & internals are real hot then submerged under water, the rapid cooling effect makes the pressure drop on the inside causing a vacuum type effect. And this vacuum can draw water into the housing thru axle seals or pinion seals. To check it, take the fill plug off & stick your finger in & see if the oil looks liek it has water in it. If you've been doing like a whole weekend of wheeling in deep mud & water for long periods of time, I would change it for peace of mind.

I discussed the lube weight with my gear guy (he and his shop built and warranties all of their work, he's also been wheeling out here in AZ for decades (it kinda gets hot out here and there are lots of rocks to wheel on), built numerous vehicles including many buggies, and his JK even made it into JP Magazine) as I was wanting to put in 75W-140 too. He asked if I was towing and I said no. He then asked why I wanted to put in 75W-140 and I said because I thought it was a "better" thing to do because I would be wheeling it. He indicated that 75W-140 is good for towing (as itís thicker when hot to help keep the gears separated when constantly pulling a load). When not towing it will get hotter (because itís thicker) which doesnít help with the life of the bearings, and it will slightly decrease your MPG (because itís thicker). I again asked about 75W-140 for wheeling, and he said he doesnít recommend it and doesnít use it in his vehicles. He built his vehicles way more than I ever will and wheels them harder than I can. I know some (many?) that donít tow put 75W-140 in the rear and even front.

I do change out the oil (actually all fluids) more often than recommend by Chrysler due to wheeling.


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