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-   -   A little help for a new guy (http://www.wranglerforum.com/f282/a-little-help-for-a-new-guy-239185.html)

TJethann 04-30-2013 12:49 AM

A little help for a new guy
 
I am wondering what would be a good way to understand the basic mechanics and parts of a jeep would be. I am 17 and grew up with no relatives with that speciality. Anything (books, websites, videos, threads, ect.) helps! Thank you!

jkucod12 04-30-2013 01:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TJethann (Post 3699943)
I am wondering what would be a good way to understand the basic mechanics and parts of a jeep would be. I am 17 and grew up with no relatives with that speciality. Anything (books, websites, videos, threads, ect.) helps! Thank you!

Try YouTube…

somis 04-30-2013 01:42 AM

I was in the same boat as you, around the same age. I started wheeling my TJ, destroyed many different parts. I enjoy working on my own vehicle. It saves me money and I gain knowledge every time.

Basically, any time you have a question, or you try to replace something, post it up on here and be as specific as possible. You will get many of people helping you out best as possible. Most likely, 100 guys or more on this website daily have had the same issue as you and will know the most efficient way to resolve the problem.

Just read around on the threads on here and you will be inspired to upgrade, fix, modify, you name it. Pretty soon you will gain enough knowledge you will be giving your own advice to other members.

Good luck to you and welcome to the forum!

somis 04-30-2013 01:44 AM

I didnt even notice your name until I posted that, my name is Ethan as well.
Haven't met to many of us in my day, hope my post helps

mudmagnet63 04-30-2013 04:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by somis (Post 3700063)
I was in the same boat as you, around the same age. I started wheeling my TJ, destroyed many different parts. I enjoy working on my own vehicle. It saves me money and I gain knowledge every time.

Basically, any time you have a question, or you try to replace something, post it up on here and be as specific as possible. You will get many of people helping you out best as possible. Most likely, 100 guys or more on this website daily have had the same issue as you and will know the most efficient way to resolve the problem.

Just read around on the threads on here and you will be inspired to upgrade, fix, modify, you name it. Pretty soon you will gain enough knowledge you will be giving your own advice to other members.

Good luck to you and welcome to the forum!

X2 just get some basic tools and start asking questions. Most everyone on here is good about helping so don't be afraid to ask. The search function will uncover almost any topic you can come up with also.

Vroooom 04-30-2013 04:55 AM

Join a jeep club, get dirty.

Hang out here.

Chelton Manuals.

YouTube.

There is a universe of knowledge waiting for anyone who wants to learn.

Thunderbuddy74 04-30-2013 05:09 AM

Here's a great post that can answer a ton of questions. Also, use the search function on here, even for just random reading. Check out this link. It's helped me with many fundamentals.

TJ Tech BOOT CAMP: A must-read for new TJ owners/forum members - JeepForum.com

Eatapeach 04-30-2013 07:48 PM

^ great link!!!!
I'm a newb too and was wondering what basic tools are good to start with.
I realize its task dependant,but just don't know where to start as far as buying the first batch of tools

Thanks

TJethann 04-30-2013 09:21 PM

What are some basic tools (please excuse how big of a newb I am haha)

PStov98TJ 04-30-2013 09:43 PM

A full set of sockets and wrenches (with standard and metric sizes) would be a good start. With a good torx bit set.

Wyominer 04-30-2013 09:56 PM

Get a socket set that includes both metric and SAE, both 3/8" & 1/2" drive with 2 or 3 different length extensions and breaker bars. On the socket set, consider craftsman, snap -on, etc. You'll get what you pay for, and these are quality and will last you a life time.

Purchase both a set of metric and SAE open-box end wrench's. For Christmas I received two sets of racheting wrench's, I really like them. With a metric wrench and socket set fill in the missed pieces with the actual metric socket or wrench (example: 16mm is left out of a lot of sets, it's the same as 9/16's, but not really).

Get a set of Allen wrenches and torque bits, again, both metric and SAE.

Harbor Freight is a good place to start. They have about everything, and reasonable prices. Also get a set of jack stands to support your Jeep. I recommend 3 ton jack stands.

You will want/need other/more tools as you progress. Getting tools is like getting firearms, they seem to multiply in the dark!

Have fun!

SeVeReDiStOrTiOn 04-30-2013 10:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TJethann (Post 3699943)
I am wondering what would be a good way to understand the basic mechanics and parts of a jeep would be. I am 17 and grew up with no relatives with that speciality. Anything (books, websites, videos, threads, ect.) helps! Thank you!

You're here so you're on the right track. Forums are the best way to get the book knowledge but wrenching on your jeep is the only way to learn and have it stick. The advice you'll get on here from people with experience is just as important as service manuals IMO...they'll tell you things the books won't. But getting a good manual should be on your to do list somewhere.

So basically ask questions, save links to write-ups and print as needed. Then go wrenchin'....your jeep isn't truly yours until your blood and sweat are on it.

PStov98TJ 04-30-2013 11:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SeVeReDiStOrTiOn (Post 3703893)

So basically ask questions, save links to write-ups and print as needed.

Very good advice. Can't tell you how many I've got bookmarked on my computer and saved in my "subscribed" section for future mods and reference.

Quote:

Originally Posted by SeVeReDiStOrTiOn (Post 3703893)

Then go wrenchin'....your jeep isn't truly yours until your blood and sweat are on it.

Also very true! Don't be scared to do the work yourself. Just about everything can be done with hand tools in your driveway. With that said though, know when to seek professional help for things like regearing.
Good luck with your jeep! And have fun with it!

TJethann 05-01-2013 12:03 AM

Thank you for all the tip! I cant wait to make my jeep truly mine! :dance:

OmniscientHiers 05-01-2013 12:05 AM

Interesting thread as I am also 17 and attempting to learn about the jeep world. Back on topic, though, I've been doing a good bit of reading at the General Jeep FAQ/Stickies area.

Rob and TJ 05-01-2013 01:01 AM

Welcome to the jeep family! I grew up in a do it yourself but do it right family. My dad knows his way around a car quite well...he rebuilt a 70 challenger from the ground up. Did a great job to. Me, being young decided chasing women and going to parties was cooler. While I did my own brakes oil changes and basic stuff, my hand was never guided. MY dads belief was you learn better on your own. If I had a question I would ask and his response was never to come out and look but instead to say "well you should see or you should blah blah blah" Even the slightest tidbit of information was an asset. But, where I found most of my help was the bible..i mean chiltens..srry. My first tool set was a tri fold crecent set. Standards...metric. After that it was a solid set of torx and a breaker bar. $85 total. Best investment ive ever made. once you understand the basic mechanics of a motor and driveline, it makes sense and is relatively easy to work your way around. Jeeps are simple in their own complicated way! Ive ranted to long, but welcome to the jeep world. You'll find it inviting...and painful on the ol' wallet!:rofl:

mudmagnet63 05-01-2013 02:59 AM

If you guys are looking for a set of tools don't overlook pawn shops. Back in my younger days I stocked up at the PS on a whole pile of tools for cheap. If you can afford it buy a whole set from a reputable tool company and they should last a lifetime. My last set from Craftsman is fairly complete withe the storage box. Here is what I am dragging around with me now. a very good basic set.


Mud


Craftsman 201 pc. Mechanic's Tools Set w/ Tri-Fold Case - Tools - Tool Sets - Mechanics Tool Sets

Eatapeach 05-02-2013 06:33 PM

Pawn shop. Great suggestion. I'm always cruising through them looking for guitars and amps anyway.

I bookmarked that Craftsman set too. Need to check my funds

speedyrev 05-02-2013 06:55 PM

Best advice here so far is a local Jeep club. You'll meet guys that have knowledge AND tools.

Jeeplover1 05-02-2013 06:57 PM

nice jeep i own the same one


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