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-   -   Oils (http://www.wranglerforum.com/f282/oils-243672.html)

hfd121 05-19-2013 02:11 PM

Oils
 
Hello,

I just picked up a 2003 Wrangler X with the 4.0 IL6 it has 94,000 on the clock and I was looking to give it a good fluid change and was looking to see what everyone was thinking on staying with regular oils or going synthetic, and with this many mile is it worth the change. Also someone said that I should use z-max stuff, I've heard good thing and so i'm not to sure I want to do the right thing to keep it running for a long time so just looking for a fresh idea.

Jerry Bransford 05-19-2013 02:12 PM

What transmission?

hfd121 05-19-2013 02:14 PM

Automatic

sinbob 05-19-2013 02:20 PM

I had 100k on mine......put royal purple syn in everything but the motor where I use Pennzoil platinum syn 10/30

Jerry Bransford 05-19-2013 02:25 PM

For the automatic, it uses/requires a specific type of ATF called ATF+4 which is a synthetic. Don't use any other type of ATF, not even Mobil-1 ATF is the right stuff. If it doesn't say ATF+4 on the front label, it's not the right stuff.

For the engine, I would run a synthetic 5W-30 there in NJ in the winter since it can get pretty cold. For more temperate conditions, a conventional 10W-30 is fine though you can run a 5W-30 year-round if you want. I personally run a conventional Valvoline 10W-30 which is fine for temperate conditions.

Your axles are not very fussy about the exact gear lube they get, they only require that the gear lube be a GL-5 which is meant for axles. Most gear lubes are GL-5, it'd be hard to find a non-GL-5, so no worries there. a 70W-80, 80W-90, or 75W-90 would be fine there where you live. But if you tow a trailer, a heavier viscosity like 80W-120, 85W-140, etc. would be a good choice. The exact viscosity of gear lube used is not critical where the axles are concerned. I prefer a conventional gear lube in my axles but for 99% of us, a synthetic is ok too.

If your rear axle is equipped with the Traclock limited slip differential, it does require a friction-modifier in the gear lube but most gear lubes already contain it. Those that have the friction modifier additive will have words to the effect of 'Compatible with limited slip differentials' on the back label.

Your transfer case also uses ATF, any ATF is fine. The same ATF+4 your transmission requires would be a very good choice.

For power steering, your Jeep requires ATF, NOT power steering fluid. ATF+4 is fine in your power steering system. Jeep switched from using power steering fluid to ATF in 2003 when the switch from the old Saginaw steering system to the Mercedes steering system was made.

Just keep in mind that major brands like Valvoline, Mobil, Castrol, Pennzoil, etc. are excellent lubricants. Paying more for some exotic "botique" lubricants like from Royal Purple may make some feel better but they are really no better at anything other than being more profitable for their makers.

Those are my personal opinions, hope they help. :)

hfd121 05-19-2013 02:35 PM

Thanks Jerry,

That really helps, want to do it right but don't want to break the bank doing it.

Thanks again

Ebxgsxr 05-26-2013 08:04 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jerry Bransford (Post 3771423)
For power steering, your Jeep requires ATF, NOT power steering fluid. ATF+4 is fine in your power steering system. Jeep switched from using power steering fluid to ATF in 2003 when the switch from the old Saginaw steering system to the Mercedes steering system was made.


is this just for the 2003 & up TJ's or all?

Jerry Bransford 05-26-2013 04:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ebxgsxr (Post 3793803)
is this just for the 2003 & up TJ's or all?

As was already said in the post you responded to, ATF+4 is only used as power steering fluid in 2003 and newer TJs.


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