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-   -   Bought my first. TJ 2003. Got 2, possibly 3 problems. Some weigh in would be dope (http://www.wranglerforum.com/f282/bought-my-first-tj-2003-got-2-possibly-3-problems-some-weigh-in-would-be-dope-245284.html)

juicyfruit 05-27-2013 02:52 AM

Bought my first. TJ 2003. Got 2, possibly 3 problems. Some weigh in would be dope
 
http://i.imgur.com/2GwBiSA.jpg

MY2003, 80,000kms/55,000miles on it. Engine and trans sound/feel super smooth

3.5" Rubicon Express lift. Not sure of the exact lift, I'll go find the serial and find out
33" bighorns
Sway bar disco's

Bought it in Adelaide and drove it back to Sydney. Long as drive, saw a camel and some emus on the way back though.

------------

Anyway so the problems, I'm taking it to the mechanic next week when my paycheck comes in, but some input from here until then would be dope

It pulls to the left probably 3-4 degrees when driving. Pretty sure the wheels are just out of alignment

When I brake, the brake pedal shudders, It feels like it's pulsing up and down, and correlates to the speed of the wheels. From a quick google diagnosis I figure this is from having a bent disc rotor. Hopefully this isn't too expensive to replace? I think they're about 60 bucks each in the states, not sure about over here (aust)

When I accelerate I get some vibrations, it feels like the drivetrain is a tiny bit off or something. Not sure how to explain it. Is it likely that I need to get an SYE/CV shaft kit?

jeepdude2003 05-27-2013 05:02 AM

Congrats on the jeep new brakes is a good place to start might want to look into upgrading them too alignment should fix the miner pull and does it viberate at speeds or just at take off

juicyfruit 05-27-2013 05:20 AM

The vibes are kind of intermittent. Sometimes it feels like it's vibrating, other times it feels smooth. It might just be that it's a 4.0L 6-cyl and I'm used to driving a crappy little mazda with a 1.8L 4cyl

Also apparently the axles are at a high risk of snapping because I've got 33s on. Can anyone weigh in? Is swapping to D44s a necessity or what?

yoopone 05-27-2013 06:20 AM

Congrats on the new Jeep. That is a great looking Jeep!

The sticker on the hood says it is a Rubicon? If so you already have Dana 44 axles front and rear. You also have an improved transfer case, so SYE is not needed. Have the brakes checked and or replaced, get a front end alignment, (they should thoroughly check front end components for wear, ect) and then crawl under and see what type of rear driveshaft you have. It should be a CV or double carden type. Should have been installed by the PO when he put the lift on. Check the angle of the pinion and the driveshaft, angle should be the same. There are several excellent threads on here that will tell you how to do that. Search on Pinion Angle. Then get out and enjoy driving the Jeep! Your issues should be pretty straight forward and soon you will be back on the road enjoying! Let us know how it goes.

Wesboy 05-27-2013 07:06 AM

Bad News - There were no TJ Rubicons sold in Australia.
Good News - All TJs sold in Australia have a Dana44 rear axle and Dana30 front axle.

Some slight pulling to the left is normal on RHD TJs driven on the left hand side of the road. Find a quiet long straight road and try driving on the wrong side for a few hundred metres (yards) and depending how bad it is on yours, the pull to the left should be almost non-existent.
The drive from Adelaide to Sydney would have been perfect to try this :)
Results will vary but it will eventually wander - when it gets over the centre of the road, the wander increases.

juicyfruit 05-27-2013 08:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Wesboy (Post 3796392)
Bad News - There were no TJ Rubicons sold in Australia.
Good News - All TJs sold in Australia have a Dana44 rear axle and Dana30 front axle.

Some slight pulling to the left is normal on RHD TJs driven on the left hand side of the road. Find a quiet long straight road and try driving on the wrong side for a few hundred metres (yards) and depending how bad it is on yours, the pull to the left should be almost non-existent.
The drive from Adelaide to Sydney would have been perfect to try this :)
Results will vary but it will eventually wander - when it gets over the centre of the road, the wander increases.

Interesting. I dismissed it being a Rubicon because the Rubicon stickers on the side of the bonnet look really cheap and are crooked. I imagined the previous owner was just being a poser or something haha

It pulls more to the left than that. I did test it quite a few times, on long stretches of road I even drove on the RHL where the road would be sloping to the right, and it still veered to the left, and I certainly couldn't have driven 300 metres without coming off the road.

I'll get under it tomorrow and take some pics, it has what looks like an aftermarket driveshaft on one side.

Also I got under and looked just before, one of the sway links is missing haha. :banghead: I didn't notice it because this is my first 4x4 and im still getting familiar with all the parts and that. There is sway bar discos and one side still has the bar.

If I buy a new pair of sway bar links, do I need to get a specific length or are they standardised for TJs?

juicyfruit 05-27-2013 08:31 AM

Just checked, d44 on the rear, d30 on the front. Wesboy's a wizard

NC Bear 05-27-2013 09:10 AM

the pulling could be a stuck caliper since you are having braking troubles. You can check alignment yourself with a tape measure.

Jerry Bransford 05-27-2013 10:14 AM

Vibrations with that tall of a lift are common when the installer didn't correctly take care of the steep rear driveshaft issues that occur. With a tall suspension lift, the rear driveshaft is short enough that its angle gets very steep. With a steep rear driveshaft (the front driveshaft is long enough that it isn't affected enough), that causes the driveshaft u-joints to have to operate into angles that are too steep for them which causes vibrations.

You can reduce those angles in several ways. The cheapest, but definitely not the best, way to reduce the angles at the u-joints is to insert a pair of spacers to drop the skidplate that supports the t-case/transmission. Yours may already have a pair of 1" spacers installed which are seldom enough to completely eliminate the vibrations such a tall lift causes. Your RE 3.5" lift is tall enough that a 1" drop would not be enough. See if your Jeep has a spacer between the frame & skidplate. If has none, add a 1" spacer which will also require longer t-case bolts... make sure the longer bolts are strong enough, they must be either 10.9 or 12.9 hardness which is a metric strength rating.

A t-case drop is not a good way to go for a big reason.... it causes a loss of ground clearance. Better, and the best fix, is to install a SYE (slip yoke eliminator) kit into your transfer case & install a replacement aftermarket CV (constant velocity) driveshaft. The SYE kit shortens the transfer case's output shaft which allows the longer driveshaft to be installed. Longer driveshafts are not as affected by tall suspension heights. A CV driveshaft does require the rear axle's pinion shaft angle be raised so it can be at the same angle as the driveshaft (which would be incorrect for your OE driveshaft).

Tall suspension lifts create problems but $$$ allows the right components to be installed which fixes those problems. Your RE 3.5" lift height is more likely 4-4.5" in reality (RE's suspension heights are generally 1" taller than advertised) & pretty much all TJs with 4" or taller suspensions either are or should be running a SYE and CV driveshaft.

Brake pedal pulsation when braking is caused by an uneven brake rotor surface. Many think that just means the rotor is warped. That can be the case but the usual cause is a deposition of brake pad material onto the rotor's surface. That can produce a pattern like a washboard road which is what causes the pulsation felt through the brake pedal. Lightly turning the rotors on a lathe can smooth it back out again. You can usually prevent that problem in the future by gradually reducing brake pedal pressure as the Jeep slows to a stop.... i.e. doing a "limousine stop".

On the veering to the left, does it do that when you try to hold the steering wheel so it is centered or does it veer to the left if you only loosely hold the steering wheel?

Lastly, I sure hate referring to dope as being good.

juicyfruit 05-27-2013 11:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jerry Bransford (Post 3796700)
Vibrations with that tall of a lift are common when the installer didn't correctly take care of the steep rear driveshaft issues that occur. With a tall suspension lift, the rear driveshaft is short enough that its angle gets very steep. With a steep rear driveshaft (the front driveshaft is long enough that it isn't affected enough), that causes the driveshaft u-joints to have to operate into angles that are too steep for them which causes vibrations.

You can reduce those angles in several ways. The cheapest, but definitely not the best, way to reduce the angles at the u-joints is to insert a pair of spacers to drop the skidplate that supports the t-case/transmission. Yours may already have a pair of 1" spacers installed which are seldom enough to completely eliminate the vibrations such a tall lift causes. Your RE 3.5" lift is tall enough that a 1" drop would not be enough. See if your Jeep has a spacer between the frame & skidplate. If has none, add a 1" spacer which will also require longer t-case bolts... make sure the longer bolts are strong enough, they must be either 10.9 or 12.9 hardness which is a metric strength rating.

A t-case drop is not a good way to go for a big reason.... it causes a loss of ground clearance. Better, and the best fix, is to install a SYE (slip yoke eliminator) kit into your transfer case & install a replacement aftermarket CV (constant velocity) driveshaft. The SYE kit shortens the transfer case's output shaft which allows the longer driveshaft to be installed. Longer driveshafts are not as affected by tall suspension heights. A CV driveshaft does require the rear axle's pinion shaft angle be raised so it can be at the same angle as the driveshaft (which would be incorrect for your OE driveshaft).

Tall suspension lifts create problems but $$$ allows the right components to be installed which fixes those problems. Your RE 3.5" lift height is more likely 4-4.5" in reality (RE's suspension heights are generally 1" taller than advertised) & pretty much all TJs with 4" or taller suspensions either are or should be running a SYE and CV driveshaft.

Brake pedal pulsation when braking is caused by an uneven brake rotor surface. Many think that just means the rotor is warped. That can be the case but the usual cause is a deposition of brake pad material onto the rotor's surface. That can produce a pattern like a washboard road which is what causes the pulsation felt through the brake pedal. Lightly turning the rotors on a lathe can smooth it back out again. You can usually prevent that problem in the future by gradually reducing brake pedal pressure as the Jeep slows to a stop.... i.e. doing a "limousine stop".

On the veering to the left, does it do that when you try to hold the steering wheel so it is centered or does it veer to the left if you only loosely hold the steering wheel?

Lastly, I sure hate referring to dope as being good.

There's an aftermarket DS on the back, I'm not too sure what type it is though.

http://i.imgur.com/zyHWY6e.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/dQapkfw.jpg

On veering to the left, if I held the steering wheel firm and completely straight, the car would be pulling to the left about 3-4 degrees

I've just found out I've gotta get it certified for road worthy which is a pain in the ass but assuming that it can pass with all this done to it, then it'll be a one off cost so it's not too bad


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