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Darkfire 06-16-2013 09:08 AM

off road Navigation GPS
 
I am looking for a good handheld GPS navigation unit for trails while off roading and hunting.

options, opinions, input....

Jerry Bransford 06-16-2013 05:49 PM

2 Attachment(s)
Having had two of them stolen, I'm now on my third Garmin GPS Map 60Cx receiver and even though it's an older model, feel it is one of the best off-road oriented GPS receivers out there. It is also meant to be hand-held in addition to being mountable in a snap-in mount in the Jeep. They are still sold all over the internet & their prices haven't dropped much because they are still so popular.

It does a lot of things few GPS receivers do that make it great for offroading. For example, you can have it record a trail as you do it & then save it with a name for future use. Or plan routes/trails via waypoints. It can also navigate & give turn-by-turn directions on the street if you buy Garmin's optional Street Nav software.

I'm still happy with mine, I have no desire to replace it. They also have a 60CSx (adds the 'S' which stands for Sensor) which adds a barometric altimeter sensor & a true magnetic compass. However, the standard 60Cx gives a darned close GPS-derived altitude as it is & gives a magnetic heading so long as you are moving. I had the 60 CSx before it was stolen but replaced it with the less expensive 60 Cx which to me works just as well.

Moabite 06-17-2013 08:30 AM

Check out the Garmin Montana 600. I've been teaching Land Navigation to one of the country's busiest Search and Rescue groups for more than 20 years and have used countless GPS units. The Montana 600 is now my dream GPS. You can download genuine USGS topo maps (the standard by which all other maps are judged) and detailed satellite imagery.

Mine is set so that I see the USGS maps when zoomed out to wider angles...and the satellite image when zoomed in closer. It's easy to see trails, spurs, even individual rocks and trees, in the satellite images. And it's nice to see a daytime satellite image when you are out on the trail at night...as we often are with SAR.

I would not recommend the 60 series. It's an older model that Garmin does not produce anymore. It was great in its time...we still issue them to SAR members. It was replaced a few years ago by the satellite-image capable 62 series. I had a couple of the 62 series for awhile...but the screen is too small for my ageing eyes, especially when trying to view satellite imagery.

I like being able to create a route on the computer with a mapping program and then loading that route into the gps. The route is then overlaid onto the satellite image or USGS map.

The user interface is the best and most intuitive I've seen in any GPS. It's completely customizeable. There are numerous options available for vehicle mounting...and the screen is actually large enough for vehicle use. Garmin also makes other less expensive models (such as the Oregon) that are similar and use virtually the same software, but have smaller screens.

You are on the right track when considering a handheld trail GPS. The OEM nav units suck. Some people use apps on their phones or tablets (I have spome of those apps too), but they do not have the same functionality as a true gps. To me, that's like buying a crossover and expecting it to perform like a real Jeep.

Darkfire 06-17-2013 08:36 AM

Does anoyone have any experience with "bad elf" GPS unit for the IPad / IPhone

insylem 06-17-2013 11:17 AM

This is the one I use. I mostly use it on my Mt Bike. Works great for me. The handlebar mount could use improvment though.
Garmin etrex 20

https://buy.garmin.com/en-US/US/on-t...prod87771.html

Jerry Bransford 06-17-2013 07:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Moabite (Post 3868745)
Check out the Garmin Montana 600. I've been teaching Land Navigation to one of the country's busiest Search and Rescue groups for more than 20 years and have used countless GPS units. The Montana 600 is now my dream GPS. You can download genuine USGS topo maps (the standard by which all other maps are judged) and detailed satellite imagery.

Mine is set so that I see the USGS maps when zoomed out to wider angles...and the satellite image when zoomed in closer. It's easy to see trails, spurs, even individual rocks and trees, in the satellite images. And it's nice to see a daytime satellite image when you are out on the trail at night...as we often are with SAR.

I would not recommend the 60 series. It's an older model that Garmin does not produce anymore. It was great in its time...we still issue them to SAR members. It was replaced a few years ago by the satellite-image capable 62 series. I had a couple of the 62 series for awhile...but the screen is too small for my ageing eyes, especially when trying to view satellite imagery.

I like being able to create a route on the computer with a mapping program and then loading that route into the gps. The route is then overlaid onto the satellite image or USGS map.

The user interface is the best and most intuitive I've seen in any GPS. It's completely customizeable. There are numerous options available for vehicle mounting...and the screen is actually large enough for vehicle use. Garmin also makes other less expensive models (such as the Oregon) that are similar and use virtually the same software, but have smaller screens.

You are on the right track when considering a handheld trail GPS. The OEM nav units suck. Some people use apps on their phones or tablets (I have spome of those apps too), but they do not have the same functionality as a true gps. To me, that's like buying a crossover and expecting it to perform like a real Jeep.

You're right, the Montana 600 is a very nice unit but its cost is over double the cost of what you can still buy a new GPS MAP 60Cx for which works great on-road and especially off-road. And I don't know if your eyes are older than my 65 year old eyes, I doubt it, but I have no problem at all reading my 60Cx. And I don't need glasses to read it either. My 60Cx works so well that I really saw nothing in the Montana 600's specifications and features that made me want to sell my 60Cx & buy the Montana 600. And you're not alone in having taught SAR, I did so as well when I was a unit commander for the CAP. :)

Moabite 06-18-2013 08:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jerry Bransford (Post 3870651)
You're right, the Montana 600 is a very nice unit but its cost is over double the cost of what you can still buy a new GPS MAP 60Cx for which works great on-road and especially off-road. And I don't know if your eyes are older than my 65 year old eyes, I doubt it, but I have no problem at all reading my 60Cx. And I don't need glasses to read it either. My 60Cx works so well that I really saw nothing in the Montana 600's specifications and features that made me want to sell my 60Cx & buy the Montana 600. And you're not alone in having taught SAR, I did so as well when I was a unit commander for the CAP. :)

Congratulations on your good eyes, young man. Yes, mine are older. While the small screen on the 60 and 62 series is ok for garmin's maps (which suck, in my opinion), a larger screen is extremely nice when viewing satellite imagery. I will never go back to a gps that does not have satellite image capability. It's the best thing to happen to a gps since Selective Availability was turned off.


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