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-   -   4WD Question (http://www.wranglerforum.com/f274/4wd-question-250344.html)

bigkevj 06-19-2013 08:40 AM

4WD Question
 
I have a 2013 Wrangler Sahara 2 door. Everything I saw on here said not to run the 4wd on normal pavement as it will ruin things. But I saw on a jeep website under FAQ that if you have full time 4wd then it is ok to run it on dry pavement since the front and rear drive shafts can run at different speeds.

My question is, do i have full or part time 4wd on my jeep?

derf 06-19-2013 08:42 AM

The JK has part time 4wd only.

The only time you should have it in 4wd on the road is if you're driving on a mud or snow covered road and need the traction.

Ivoryring 06-19-2013 09:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by derf (Post 3876946)
The JK has part time 4wd only.

The only time you should have it in 4wd on the road is if you're driving on a mud or snow covered road and need the traction.

And that means completely mud or snow covered. If you are in a situation where you've got patches of slush and patches of merely wet or even dry road (this is far more often the case here in NH than full snow cover), then you don't want 4wd engaged.

derf 06-19-2013 09:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ivoryring (Post 3877062)
And that means completely mud or snow covered. If you are in a situation where you've got patches of slush and patches of merely wet or even dry road (this is far more often the case here in NH than full snow cover), then you don't want 4wd engaged.

Yes.

ToothDoc 06-19-2013 09:26 AM

I'm surprised at what mine will go through in 2 wheel drive!

panthermark 06-19-2013 09:32 AM

Ivory and derf were spot on.... Wrangler's do not have a center differential, so you cannot run 4WD on dry pavement (unless you are going in a perfectly straight line....which would make no sense little sense to use 4WD). Use 4WD for deep mud, snow, and off-roading.

nekojku 06-19-2013 09:43 AM

Turn on dry pavement with 4x4 engaged will make your JK hop and bounce like crazy.

http://blog.jokerbrand.net/wp-conten.../04/64-hop.gif

DarthGromit 06-19-2013 11:59 AM

This
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by ToothDoc (Post 3877082)
I'm surprised at what mine will go through in 2 wheel drive!

This.

most people dont realize just what you can do with 2wd; 4wd isn't some sort of savior setting, you need it alot less then you think you do. on pavement you pretty much just dont need it, unless as mentioned above, its covered in slush/ice/snow or mud or standing water, etc.

Now, having said that, the tires you choose will also help/hurt how much you maintain traction, so make sure you're choosing an appropriate tire to the conditions, not just the biggest knobbiest mud tire you can find.

Kennyksu 06-19-2013 01:12 PM

Also, remember that not being in 4wd in your Wrangler means that you are in RWD. For folks not used to RWD in slick stuff, it can feel a bit hairy when you see your back end starting to pass you. Easy on the gas until you've slid around a bit and know how to recover.

Mark b 06-19-2013 01:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Kennyksu (Post 3877751)
Also, remember that not being in 4wd in your Wrangler means that you are in RWD. For folks not used to RWD in slick stuff, it can feel a bit hairy when you see your back end starting to pass you. Easy on the gas until you've slid around a bit and know how to recover.

I love it when that happens. A lot hairy in a Jeep than a car but it's still fun.

A lot of people also forget that not all 4 wheels are turning in most 4x4's, even in a Jeep. More like one front and one rear.

Unless you have lockers. Love me some Lockers....."The Saviors Savior"

RoadiJeff 06-19-2013 01:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mark b (Post 3877773)
I
A lot of people also forget that not all 4 wheels are turning in most 4x4's, even in a Jeep. More like one front and one rear.

I've never looked while driving but I'm pretty sure that all 4 wheels on my Jeep turn when it is moving. :rofl:

Yes, I know what you meant. :D

Mark b 06-19-2013 01:33 PM

Yea, I guess my wording is a little jacked. :)

I guess I meant 4 wheels are "driven", "powered".....well ya know what I mean.

mgola27 06-19-2013 03:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mark b (Post 3877835)
Yea, I guess my wording is a little jacked. :)

I guess I meant 4 wheels are "driven", "powered".....well ya know what I mean.

Well, that's technically not right either. On an evenly grippy/slick surface, all four wheels will drive/slip.

For instance, if you were on ice with all four wheels having the same lack of traction, all four wheels would spin.

The issue is if one front and one rear wheel is on ice and the other two are on pavement. The torque will be applied to the wheel/s with the least resistance. Traction control, BLD, and LSD help combat this and generally do a good job, as it's rare to have 0% friction.

That's why rock crawlers want lockers, as they frequently have one or two wheels off the ground. Without lockers, if you had one front and rear wheel off the ground, those wheels would simply spin and you couldn't move.

joeuncool 06-19-2013 05:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ToothDoc (Post 3877082)
I'm surprised at what mine will go through in 2 wheel drive!

I discovered the same thing. My jeep is the best 2wd vehicle I have ever driven on snow covered streets. I have driven all manner of RWD and FWD vehicles in the snow. It got to the point where I would rarely put it in 4wd on a snowy street. Just didn't need it.

joeuncool 06-19-2013 05:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Kennyksu (Post 3877751)
Also, remember that not being in 4wd in your Wrangler means that you are in RWD. For folks not used to RWD in slick stuff, it can feel a bit hairy when you see your back end starting to pass you. Easy on the gas until you've slid around a bit and know how to recover.

This is the first vehicle I have had with traction control. First time with snow, found a parking lot and hit the gas!!!. Wait a minute. Why is the backend still back there and the engine acted like it cut out...? Ohhhhhh, that's how that works. Well, ESP might as well mean No Fun At All.

"Hold on, hold on. I am going to do a donut too! I just have to remember to hit this silly button!"

THW 06-19-2013 09:44 PM

I actually find that I need 4H pretty often in the winter where I live- even if there is only an inch or two of snow on the road I can hit patches of slush and packed snow that require 4x4 even though it's paved road that is not necessarily completely covered. I know what you all are getting at- 4 wheel drive is something to be used when needed and disengaged as soon as it's no longer needed- but even here in northern CT we get enough snow and sleet that I have to engage 4H pretty regularly. Once I hit the main roads in town I'm always fine in 2wd though.

Note: I live in a very rural, hilly area with very old and winding roads which are plowed by independent contractors (i.e. kids with Silverados)

NFRs2000NYC 06-19-2013 10:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ToothDoc (Post 3877082)
I'm surprised at what mine will go through in 2 wheel drive!

Drove through 12" for about 30 miles last year, and realized when I parked that I never put it in 4WD. Long live Duratracs!

DC Dennis 06-19-2013 10:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ivoryring (Post 3877062)
And that means completely mud or snow covered. If you are in a situation where you've got patches of slush and patches of merely wet or even dry road (this is far more often the case here in NH than full snow cover), then you don't want 4wd engaged.

4wd in the rain or a primarily wet road is fine. Of course you don't want to use it on a bone dry road, but it won't destroy your Jeep in a mile of driving either.

NFRs2000NYC 06-19-2013 10:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DC Dennis (Post 3879798)
4wd in the rain or a primarily wet road is fine. Of course you don't want to use it on a bone dry road, but it won't destroy your Jeep in a mile of driving either.

If the rain is so bad that you need 4WD, you need to shift back into 2WD and slow that mother down. 4WD doesnt help you stop.

terrabit 06-19-2013 10:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by NFRs2000NYC (Post 3879822)

If the rain is so bad that you need 4WD, you need to shift back into 2WD and slow that mother down. 4WD doesnt help you stop.

It's not magic but, 4wd can help you slow down under control. I've used it coming down steep descents on slippery surfaces where brakes were less effective.

DC Dennis 06-20-2013 08:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by terrabit (Post 3879851)
It's not magic but, 4wd can help you slow down under control. I've used it coming down steep descents on slippery surfaces where brakes were less effective.

This. It also helps you with hills and all around control. Gives you the benefits of front and rear wheel drive.

Of course one should be cognative of their speed, and full time 4WD is a superior choice, but don't be scared of using your part time system when it can be of benefit.

64Chevy 06-20-2013 09:49 AM

I was taught in the 4WD course I took (that used Jeep Rubis, but the way) to always put it in 4WD when you hit the dirt. That way you don't get surprised or forget. This is when you are actually going wheeling, and not (of course) necessary on well maintained dirt roads, etc.

panthermark 06-20-2013 10:41 AM

Bascically....unless you wheels can "slip", don't engage 4WD.

When you are in 4WD, your front and rear axles are locked together...and even with differentials in each pumpkin, one front wheel and one rear wheel have to rotate at the exact same speed. Not so much an issue when going in s straight line...but when you make a turn, all 4 wheels rotate at different speeds....if two of the wheels (one front and one rear) are locked together, you get binding when on dry pavement because one wheel is trying to turn at a differnt speed than the other, but they are locked together.

JK's have Command-trac...which is part-time 4WD. Part time because it can only be used part of the time.

I had Selec-trac in my old Libby, which had a full-time mode. Since it had a center differential, I could leave it in 4WD on any pavement. The center differential allowed the "locked" wheels to rotate at different speeds.

Maitre 06-20-2013 10:51 AM

I have a 2012 4 runner SR5 with part time 4wd. Toyota recommends that the 4H be engaged for at least 10 miles/month in order to keep the gears lubricated.
Why is the JK different?

BManz 06-20-2013 10:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by NFRs2000NYC (Post 3879756)

Drove through 12" for about 30 miles last year, and realized when I parked that I never put it in 4WD. Long live Duratracs!

Dittos here in Chicagoland with the Duratracs!

NFRs2000NYC 06-20-2013 11:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Maitre (Post 3881329)
I have a 2012 4 runner SR5 with part time 4wd. Toyota recommends that the 4H be engaged for at least 10 miles/month in order to keep the gears lubricated.
Why is the JK different?

Thats weird. The fluid inside the transfercase is still moving around. :confused:

Plasticpirogue 06-20-2013 11:36 AM

My brother (mechanical engineer and heck of a good mechanic) recommended that I "exercise" the 4WD from time to time. Reason: splashes fresh, warm lube on all of the seals, fully soaks all of the moving parts, prevents sludge buildup, and "flexes" all of the linkages. It also helps to insure that the system works as designed when you really do need it and reach for the selector lever, yank on it, and nothing happens. I just pop mine into 4H on dirt and gravel roads every weekend when I am headed out fishing.

derf 06-20-2013 12:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Maitre (Post 3881329)
I have a 2012 4 runner SR5 with part time 4wd. Toyota recommends that the 4H be engaged for at least 10 miles/month in order to keep the gears lubricated.
Why is the JK different?

Depends on how the transfer case is designed and several other factors.

The front driveshaft on the JK is always turning when you're driving. This makes the chain inside the case move, pushing fluid around everywhere, along with the rest of the parts moving.

In older 4x4 trucks with manual locking hubs you can unlock the hubs and in 2WD, the front shaft doesn't turn. In my J10 I have an NP208 (predecessor to the NP231/241) and lock out hubs. My chain doesn't move much when I have that in 2WD and unlocked hubs. You get some fluid moving around but not as much. It's more important in that truck to run in 4WD once in a while to make sure things get moved around and properly lubricated.

That being said, it's never a bad idea to head out to a dirt road somewhere once a month or so and throw it in 4HI (and even 4LO) for a couple of miles just to make sure everything still works and checks out.

Maitre 06-20-2013 12:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Plasticpirogue (Post 3881510)
My brother (mechanical engineer and heck of a good mechanic) recommended that I "exercise" the 4WD from time to time. Reason: splashes fresh, warm lube on all of the seals, fully soaks all of the moving parts, prevents sludge buildup, and "flexes" all of the linkages. It also helps to insure that the system works as designed when you really do need it and reach for the selector lever, yank on it, and nothing happens. I just pop mine into 4H on dirt and gravel roads every weekend when I am headed out fishing.

I do the same, maybe not 10 miles/month but less, just to "wake" the system up and remind him that he is there and be ready ...;)

sevenservices 06-20-2013 12:23 PM

The full time your thinking of may be on some grand cherokee's, thats how our durango r/t is. Its all wheel drive basically w/limited slip to each tire. Then you have the option for 4-highlock and 4-lowlock which changes the gearing and engages the lockers in the front and rear difs. Some traction systems have a lot of options as well. If you have an owners manual see what it says about your specific model.


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