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-   -   Anti-Spin Differential Rear Axle / 3.73 (http://www.wranglerforum.com/f274/anti-spin-differential-rear-axle-3-73-a-255900.html)

DrSaw 07-15-2013 08:06 AM

Anti-Spin Differential Rear Axle / 3.73
 
I am still doind research for a purchase for a 2013 Sport with automatic. For non off-road vehicle, do you think I need ASD and 3.73?

No plans to change the tires or wheels.

Thx!

panthermark 07-15-2013 08:10 AM

2 door or 4 door?

Where do you live?

Honestly, I would say yes to getting both, but if you are getting a 2 door Sport that will be 100% on (flat) road, you don't "need" the 3.73's if you know you will never go with larger wheels. However, I would still consider getting them.

BacaraJKU 07-15-2013 08:58 AM

I agree, I bought my jeep used (8 months old). The guy that owned it purchased the Max Tow and LSD. I didn't know I wanted both of those until I had them.

Although I do go off road, I really wanted 3.73's for towing and LSD for sand which is where most of my off roading happens. For the price I would get both.

DC Dennis 07-15-2013 09:02 AM

Yes! Get it! Great deal!!!

Driving in snow, wet, stop light gran prix? It is totally worth it.

Off road the stock Sport tires suck so much that it is all that kept me from getting stuck in a wet field the other day.

JoseRubicon 07-15-2013 09:16 AM

Get both. You won't regret it.

LoCo Jeep 07-15-2013 09:16 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DrSaw (Post 3963726)
I am still doind research for a purchase for a 2013 Sport with automatic. For non off-road vehicle, do you think I need ASD and 3.73?

No plans to change the tires or wheels.

Thx!


Absolutely not.....according to how you are going to use your vehicle.

jj77 07-15-2013 09:23 AM

If you live in hilly country, hell yea. 3.21 gears are for the flat lands. transmitions get worked in and out of gear which causes more wear n tear. If it were a stick ide say maybe but otherwise, get the gears! More torque = more power to pull. engine doesnt have to work as hard, etc.

Scrivah 07-15-2013 09:28 AM

I would say get them both. It's far easier to get it now for the low price than to want to add it later. Also if you ever sell it's a good selling feature to say you have them both.

derf 07-15-2013 09:31 AM

If I were buying a Jeep and I wasn't planning on upsizing the tires over the stock 32's, I would go with the 3.73 gears without exception.

As far as the limited slip (anti-spin), I would be flexible on. If it has it, great. If not, it's not a deal breaker. For strictly on road driving, the traction control system is probably enough to help you the few times you need it. But having the limited slip is certainly not a bad thing. If you're looking at one on the lot (which you would have to for a 2013 these days) I wouldn't hesitate to pay for it if the Jeep has it. I also wouldn't pass over the Jeep if it didn't.

panthermark 07-15-2013 09:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LoCo Jeep (Post 3963891)
Absolutely not.....according to how you are going to use your vehicle.

I don't off-road. I have stock 32's. I specifically ordered both.

Having LSD is a plus in winter or wet conditions. There isn't much of a downside to it. Now, if you live in Texas or Arizona or southern Cali or someplace like that...winter driving does not apply.

3.73's were needed to get the 3500 tow rating on a 4 door. If I were getting a 2 door auto, I would have considered 3.21's.

jklarry 07-15-2013 10:03 AM

you will be driving a brick, 3.73's and lsd is a MUST. I would NEVER consider a 3.21 except in a Honda.

LoCo Jeep 07-15-2013 10:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by panthermark (Post 3964000)
I don't off-road.

3.73's were needed to get the 3500 tow rating on a 4 door. If I were getting a 2 door auto, I would have considered 3.21's.

Good point and one I agree with, if the OP is going to buy a 4 door and he wants to tow in excess of 2000 lbs then get the 3.73.

As for the limited slip....agree to disagree, never had it never needed it.

panthermark 07-15-2013 10:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jklarry (Post 3964032)
you will be driving a brick, 3.73's and lsd is a MUST. I would NEVER consider a 3.21 except in a Honda.

Keep in mind we are talking about a different engine and tranny that what you are used to. If I remember correctly, you have the 3.8 engine with the 42RLE tranny and 33's.

3.21's on your particular set up would be brutal.

3.21's on a 2012+ (3.6) with the NAG1/WA580 on stock wheels (especially a 2 door) would be OK as a communter in flat areas.

KP50 07-15-2013 10:25 AM

The ASD will come in handy if you have to turn into traffic in the rain/snow, the electronics will work but will also limit power if you start really spinning one tire until it gets up to speed. Hardcore off roaders wont want the clutch ASD, but they would probably get into a rubicon with the lockers..

I have a '13 2 door auto with the 3.73s and if I was to keep the stock tires I wouldnt mind the 3.21. The 5 speed auto had a pretty low 1st gear and the 3.73 is almost a bit of overkill IMO.

thejdj 07-15-2013 10:36 AM

I drove both 3.21 w/o LSD and 3.73 w/ LSD (and other combos) during my search. 3.73 is definitely the better choice in almost every situation. LSD is nice to have but, IMO, not a deal breaker if you find one with everything else you want.

WXman 07-15-2013 11:25 AM

As I have said before, I would never take the "limited slip" option.

First of all, it has for years been nick-named "Trash-Lok" for a reason and that's because the clutches wear out over time and stop working and then break and scatter. Two days ago I popped open the rear diff on a Ram pickup that my buddy bought and it was ordered with the limited slip option. There were big pieces of metal laying in the bottom of the case. Thank God they didn't get thrown into the ring gear or spider gears when they broke. Who wants this junk in their rear axles for an extra cost of hundreds of dollars??

Second, you can buy a helical limited slip or lunchbox style locker for roughly the same money and have something that will actually work.

Third, the electronic traction control on JKs works better than any limited slip ever did. With both open diffs I was able to go places that other older Jeeps couldn't follow.

panthermark 07-15-2013 11:46 AM

LSD can be important based on your location and use.

If you don't see a lot of snow/ice/rain where you live, LSD won't be as much of a priority.

Trac-Lok vs aftermarket is a different argument. I thought about passing on Trac-Lok and going aftermarket, but for how I use the Jeep....it simply wasn't worth it.

If I was going to do a lot of off-roading, but still wanted LSD, I would pass on Trac-Lok and go with an aftermarket TrueTrac. But for just city driving with the occasional gravel or fire road once every 6 months, Trac-Loc is just fine for $295 MSRP and covered under the factory warranty.

Trac-Lok gets the name "Trash-Lok" because it is useless for off-roading...especially compared to an Eaton or something. But there are not a lot of Wrangler owners that are going to open up the pumpkin on brand new Jeep to install an Eaton on a rig that will be stock and used on pavement 99.99% of the time. With light duty use, the clutch packs will last quite a while.

Rmiller31 07-15-2013 12:01 PM

For me 3.73 would be a must have. If you plan on going for bigger tires it will really be worth it.

I've getting gears tomorrow and was wrestling the last two weeks on if I should add a truetrac but in the end every time I see a situation on the trail where I want more traction a locker would be of much more benefit. This is from a strictly offroad point of view. I opted to skip the truetrac and just add a locker when I add onboard air.

GCMatt 07-15-2013 01:32 PM

I was planning to get the LSD, since we occasionally get snow, and it seemed like it would be better than a totally open diff. Keeping in mind that, it is likely to stay 90% on the road, and then be logging road and (potentially poorly maintained) forest roads otherwise.

I am curious if getting the factory LSD limits my options though. I know you can add an aftermarket LSD (or a locker) if you don't get one from the factory. If you DO get the factory LSD, how hard is it to replace it with an aftermarket one? Is it just about the same as adding the aftermarket one to stock, or does it add a lot more hassle? Is there an aftermarket option like the TJ Rubicons, that is a combination of LSD and locker?

If factory LSD makes things more complicated later, or if I could get a combination LSD/locker, I'd probably do that. Yeah, it is overkill, but so is getting a Wrangler start with. Being able to customize and indulge in some overkill is the whole reason I chose the Wrangler in the first place. :)

panthermark 07-15-2013 01:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GCMatt (Post 3964700)
I was planning to get the LSD, since we occasionally get snow, and it seemed like it would be better than a totally open diff. Keeping in mind that, it is likely to stay 90% on the road, and then be logging road and (potentially poorly maintained) forest roads otherwise.

I am curious if getting the factory LSD limits my options though. I know you can add an aftermarket LSD (or a locker) if you don't get one from the factory. If you DO get the factory LSD, how hard is it to replace it with an aftermarket one? Is it just about the same as adding the aftermarket one to stock, or does it add a lot more hassle? Is there an aftermarket option like the TJ Rubicons, that is a combination of LSD and locker?

If factory LSD makes things more complicated later, or if I could get a combination LSD/locker, I'd probably do that. Yeah, it is overkill, but so is getting a Wrangler start with. Being able to customize and indulge in some overkill is the whole reason I chose the Wrangler in the first place. :)

If I remember correctly, adding LSD from the factory DOES make it a bit more difficult to add an aftermarket LSD down the road.

GCMatt 07-15-2013 02:22 PM

How hard is an aftermarket install if you are moderately handy (though relatively new to working on cars)? I do have access to a lift if that helps/is necessary.

Of course, I also have access to a good mechanic, too, but learning about things myself is one of the things I wanted to do with the Wrangler. :)

derf 07-15-2013 02:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GCMatt (Post 3964863)
How hard is an aftermarket install if you are moderately handy (though relatively new to working on cars)? I do have access to a lift if that helps/is necessary.

Of course, I also have access to a good mechanic, too, but learning about things myself is one of the things I wanted to do with the Wrangler. :)

If you're just replacing the carrier and not changing gears, it's not terribly hard. You need an install kit with new carrier bearings and shims. You need to swap the ring gear from one case to the other and put the new carrier in. Once you do that you need to ensure you get the correct amount of backlash and that the gears still mesh correctly. A dial indicator is about the only specialty tool you need. Though having access a press to get the new bearings on the new carrier certainly helps.

If you're going to regear at the same time you need a few more tools than that. You need to set the pinion depth correctly, which involves making setup bearings or pressing and pulling the bearings a couple of times. Beyond that, you need a big enough wrench to crush the crush sleeve to properly set the bearing preload on the pinion. You need several hundred foot pounds to crush that sleeve. When I participated in doing my gears we needed a 5 foot long cheater pipe on a 3/4" drive socket and still had to put everything into it to get the torque we needed. If you've never done it before and don't know anyone who has, you're better off letting a shop handle it.

lolpetewtf 07-15-2013 03:07 PM

No.

Blastek 07-15-2013 03:42 PM

Have to say that I've driven my JKU in rain, snow, ice, mud, and soft sand (mostly on the road) and I've never gotten stuck or felt that I needed an LSD. It does amazing with open diffs and I don't regret passing on the option when I ordered. To me, it was just another repair item.

After 20k miles, I'm very happy with the 3.73s. On the road, even with the stock 17" setup, the performance is just right and I still net 20 mpg.

Dmc1 07-15-2013 05:13 PM

When I bought my 2013 LSD and 3:73 were the two biggies for me. You won't regret getting them if you do decide to change tires in the future.:thumb:

KP50 07-15-2013 08:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by WXman (Post 3964299)
As I have said before, I would never take the "limited slip" option.

First of all, it has for years been nick-named "Trash-Lok" for a reason and that's because the clutches wear out over time and stop working and then break and scatter. Two days ago I popped open the rear diff on a Ram pickup that my buddy bought and it was ordered with the limited slip option. There were big pieces of metal laying in the bottom of the case. Thank God they didn't get thrown into the ring gear or spider gears when they broke. Who wants this junk in their rear axles for an extra cost of hundreds of dollars??

Second, you can buy a helical limited slip or lunchbox style locker for roughly the same money and have something that will actually work.

Third, the electronic traction control on JKs works better than any limited slip ever did. With both open diffs I was able to go places that other older Jeeps couldn't follow.

The electronic traction control will get way more life out of a clutch LSD as well. Number one clutch type posi killer is spinning one tire hard and the other not spinning at all. In normal driving (as long as both of your tires on the axle are the same diameter anyhow) a clutch type should easily go 100K miles.

I'm not saying the Jeep ASD is the best on earth, if you are wheeling all it takes is the one time where the clutches dont hold and you give it a lot of throttle to glaze the clutches and from there its a downhill slide - but - the electronic traction control you mentioned should stop that from happening and help an ASD go anywhere an open will.

Torsen/helical and detroit locker diffs can fail pretty spectacularly as well if you have enough torque

CaptnGus 07-15-2013 08:28 PM

I totally agree with the majority. I got both when I ordered my '08 new, and I'm so glad I did.

ahsumtoy 07-15-2013 08:32 PM

Arizona?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by panthermark (Post 3964000)
Having LSD is a plus in winter or wet conditions. There isn't much of a downside to it. Now, if you live in Texas or Arizona or southern Cali or someplace like that...winter driving does not apply.

Everyone thinks Arizona is hot with tons of cactus (lol). Well, I live near Flagstaff which is over 7,000 ft and we get tons of snow. Also, there is Big Bear and Mt Baldy in S. Calif. that get a lot of snow as well. I don't know about Texas, however. Just thought I'd enlighten everyone about Arizona and S. Calif.

I went with the 3.73 gears and LSD. Get them both.

WatchThis! 07-15-2013 09:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ahsumtoy (Post 3966279)
Everyone thinks Arizona is hot with tons of cactus (lol). Well, I live near Flagstaff which is over 7,000 ft and we get tons of snow. Also, there is Big Bear and Mt Baldy in S. Calif. that get a lot of snow as well. I don't know about Texas, however. Just thought I'd enlighten everyone about Arizona and S. Calif.

I went with the 3.73 gears and LSD. Get them both.

The pan handle of Texas gets lots of snow every year also. I don't think people from the north east realize just how big the states are and how much different terrain they have to them once you get past the Mississippi. I hear you "you are from Texas so you only know about the desert" when the truth is I have to drive 7 hours before I start to get there. Its all river bottoms and pine trees where I live.

panthermark 07-15-2013 11:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ahsumtoy (Post 3966279)
Everyone thinks Arizona is hot with tons of cactus (lol). Well, I live near Flagstaff which is over 7,000 ft and we get tons of snow. Also, there is Big Bear and Mt Baldy in S. Calif. that get a lot of snow as well. I don't know about Texas, however. Just thought I'd enlighten everyone about Arizona and S. Calif.

I went with the 3.73 gears and LSD. Get them both.

Fair enough.... I have land in New Mexico...and there is indeed snow there.

Quote:

Originally Posted by WatchThis! (Post 3966450)
The pan handle of Texas gets lots of snow every year also. I don't think people from the north east realize just how big the states are and how much different terrain they have to them once you get past the Mississippi. I hear you "you are from Texas so you only know about the desert" when the truth is I have to drive 7 hours before I start to get there. Its all river bottoms and pine trees where I live.

I used to live in Dallas and Garland, and spent a good chunk of time in Houston where some of my family is still at (when they are not visiting Oklahoma).....which is where my POV is coming from....so I'm just generalizing a bit.
I know Texas isn't the Mojave...especially in east Texas where the humidity will suffocate you. I've driven to and through Texas more times than I can count. I'm just saying, winter in Texas isn't like winter in Chicago or Iowa. But to be honest, as of late....our winters have gotten pretty mild. When I was a kid in Iowa...when the first big snow hit (late November, early December), that snow didn't go away until March....sometime after the basketball state tournament (always the last big snow of the year for some reason).


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