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-   -   alignment (http://www.wranglerforum.com/f210/alignment-259127.html)

Michael Storm 07-29-2013 12:25 PM

alignment
 
After putting a suspension lift on my jeep I was calling around to get questions answ red about an alignment. I was quoted 150 for a front end alignment and told it's a bit extra because they are dealt ng with aftermarket parts. Is this a fair price? Also I plan on receiving a set of MC control arms in a couple weeks. Should I wait to get a front end alignment untill then, or will it make no difference? Thanks in advance for advice/input.

Ironhead Jed 07-29-2013 12:27 PM

do it yourself, takes about 10 min from start to finish

Basic Jeep Front End Alignment

only thing i would add is a 18" to 24" pipe wrench for turning the tie-rod.

Cons_Table 07-29-2013 12:29 PM

That is way too much. I think the last time I did it, it cost me about $50...but then I learned how to do it myself. They only thing a front end alignment consists of is adjusting the toe, and recentering the steering wheel. If you have adjustable control arms (which it sounds like you are getting soon) you can then adjust your castor. However, if it were me I would just do the alignment myself. It is pretty simple and can be done pretty quickly.

http://www.wranglerforum.com/f5/basi...ent-86996.html

thgr8alex 07-29-2013 12:30 PM

I think pepboys does it for like 80 if you choose not to do it yourself. If you go during the day its cheaper, they do weekday deals

Michael Storm 07-29-2013 12:47 PM

No pepboys up here. I'm in fairbanks Ak and do to the lack of, anything really being up here; they sometimes (most often) inflate prices. I'll try adjusting it myself, hopefully it's not too much pain after reading those threads. I was looking forward to taking a break from tinkering untill the set of control arms is ordered and received lol.

Ironhead Jed 07-29-2013 12:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Michael Storm (Post 4015895)
No pepboys up here. I'm in fairbanks Ak and do to the lack of, anything really being up here; they sometimes (most often) inflate prices. I'll try adjusting it myself, hopefully it's not too much pain after reading those threads. I was looking forward to taking a break from tinkering untill the set of control arms is ordered and received lol.

dont worry man, its really easy. if you can read a tape measure, you can complete your alignment. installing a lift is much more complicated and you already tackled that

Cons_Table 07-29-2013 12:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Michael Storm (Post 4015895)
No pepboys up here. I'm in fairbanks Ak and do to the lack of, anything really being up here; they sometimes (most often) inflate prices. I'll try adjusting it myself, hopefully it's not too much pain after reading those threads. I was looking forward to taking a break from tinkering untill the set of control arms is ordered and received lol.

It really goes pretty quick... its an easy tinker that will save you 150 unnecessary dollars:thumb:

flflash 07-29-2013 02:52 PM

$150 is Way to HIGH! I work at a dealership and we only charge $59.95!

Michael Storm 07-29-2013 02:59 PM

Thought it sounded a bit steep

Cptc223 07-29-2013 11:12 PM

You can prolly get your toe and caster correct but the only way to get your camber in spec if its out is to put offset ball joints in the price seems a little steep but if your gonna drive it alot and or are worried about tire wear I think you should get it done correctly.
I do alignments for a living vehicles with lifts are harder to adjust but the equipment I use isn't cheap so it kinda helps on adjusting ;)
But that still seems kinda high I would say nothing more than 125 would be reasonable for an alignment

Cons_Table 07-29-2013 11:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cptc223 (Post 4018174)
You can prolly get your toe and caster correct but the only way to get your camber in spec if its out is to put offset ball joints in the price seems a little steep but if your gonna drive it alot and or are worried about tire wear I think you should get it done correctly.
I do alignments for a living vehicles with lifts are harder to adjust but the equipment I use isn't cheap so it kinda helps on adjusting ;)
But that still seems kinda high I would say nothing more than 125 would be reasonable for an alignment

Funny thing is, offset ball joints are pretty uncommon on jeeps. They are available, but you dont hear people using them too often. The only reason you would need offset balljoints is if there is something bent on the housing...otherwise the regular ones are fine.

Cptc223 07-29-2013 11:41 PM

I had a 2013 Jk with 806 miles on it I put one on last week it doesn't take much camber off to wear tires nothing was bent on it I have a Hunter alignment rack and Car O Liner computerized measuring system for frames and every other mechanical part of a vehicle that measures to the precise millimeter this one came from the factory that way I see stuff happen like that all the time.
The jk was just outta spec by .50 degrees which would wear tires. All I'm saying is if it was mine and I had an expensive set of tires on my Lj I would want the set to last as long as the could correctly without irregular wear on the edges.
I'm not trying to argue or tell the guy to do something he wouldn't want to do im just telling him from experience what id do.
We're all here to help eachother out aren't we?

Derp 07-30-2013 06:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cptc223 (Post 4018241)
I had a 2013 Jk with 806 miles on it I put one on last week it doesn't take much camber off to wear tires nothing was bent on it I have a Hunter alignment rack and Car O Liner computerized measuring system for frames and every other mechanical part of a vehicle that measures to the precise millimeter this one came from the factory that way I see stuff happen like that all the time.
The jk was just outta spec by .50 degrees which would wear tires. All I'm saying is if it was mine and I had an expensive set of tires on my Lj I would want the set to last as long as the could correctly without irregular wear on the edges.
I'm not trying to argue or tell the guy to do something he wouldn't want to do im just telling him from experience what id do.
We're all here to help eachother out aren't we?

They really aren't that necessary on a straight axle. Never had mine out of spec since. Bought it. Hell I know people running 40's and the like wearing even..

Jerry Bransford 07-30-2013 09:25 AM

For a TJ, there really is no need to take it to an alignment shop if you own a tape measure, wrench, & pliers or a pipe wrench for rotating the tie rod. In all seriousness and without exaggeration, your toe-in (the only thing that is adjustable) can be set every bit as accurately at home as can be set on the latest whiz-bang laser alignment rack can produce. Really.

All that needs to be done is to rotate the tie-rod until the tires are 1/16" to 1/8" closer together in front than they are in the rear.

The Basic Alignment link given in post #2 above shows everything needed, including how to re-center the steering wheel which is just as easy.

I'll post a pair of photos tonight of a method that makes the toe-in adjustment measurement even easier than measuring between the tire treads, and more repeatable as well.

The bottom line is you don't need to pay to have this done, it's far easier to do than you could guess. And with just a little care, your results will be just as accurate as an alignent shop can produce. Really. :)

thgr8alex 07-31-2013 12:18 AM

Just curious jerry, ill be checking mine soon just to make sure its good but what was the method you mentioned that makes it easier than measuring inbetween tire tread?

kjeeper10 07-31-2013 01:38 AM

What works for me assuming you have tready tires. I screw 2 small screws in the treads-somewhere in the middle of each tire. Hook the tape measure on one, Run across and measure Rotate tires 180 and measure the back side. Really easy to do yourself. Takes 10 minutes or less.

Water Dog 07-31-2013 09:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kjeeper10 (Post 4022758)
What works for me assuming you have tready tires. I screw 2 small screws in the treads-somewhere in the middle of each tire. Hook the tape measure on one, Run across and measure Rotate tires 180 and measure the back side. Really easy to do yourself. Takes 10 minutes or less.

I use basially the same system, but with duct tape and sharpie instead of screws. Just place the duct tape edge along a lug that you can hook a tape on and mark it.

Jerry Bransford 07-31-2013 09:42 AM

2 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by thgr8alex (Post 4022559)
Just curious jerry, ill be checking mine soon just to make sure its good but what was the method you mentioned that makes it easier than measuring inbetween tire tread?

Two pieces of 1" square aluminum tubing marked at points to equal your tire diameter, and two spring clamps to hold them centered on the rotors. Make sure the front axle is supported via jackstands so everything is weighted the same as it is when you're driving.

Just measure between them at the marks equal to your tire diameter, then rotate the tie rod until the front is 1/16" to 1/8" closer together than it is in the rear. I lean towards 1/16" for my 35" tires, I'd lean towards 1/8" for a small factory-size tires.

Full credit for this idea & photos goes to Blaine Johnson of Black Magic Brakes & Savvy Offroad. :)

kjeeper10 07-31-2013 09:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jerry Bransford (Post 4023718)
Two pieces of 1" square aluminum tubing marked at points to equal your tire diameter, and two spring clamps to hold them centered on the rotors. Make sure the front axle is supported via jackstands so everything is weighted the same as it is when you're driving.

Just measure between them at the marks equal to your tire diameter, then rotate the tie rod until the front is 1/16" to 1/8" closer together than it is in the rear. I lean towards 1/16" for my 35" tires, I'd lean towards 1/8" for a small factory-size tires.

Full credit for this idea & photos goes to Blaine Johnson of Black Magic Brakes & Savvy Offroad. :)

Who has time for dis lol
Just kidding ..... :D

WVU Mountainman 07-31-2013 10:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kjeeper10 (Post 4023780)

Who has time for dis lol
Just kidding ..... :D

Ain't nobody got time for dat :)

Jerry Bransford 07-31-2013 11:00 AM

Who dat who say who dat. :D

kjeeper10 07-31-2013 11:02 AM

Time to put the peanut butter away :rofl:

Cons_Table 07-31-2013 11:09 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Attachment 279845

rdock31 07-31-2013 11:15 AM

How likely is it for the tie rod to bend from trying to break it loose.

Jerry Bransford 07-31-2013 11:44 AM

Not at all. The tie rod can be difficult to rotate the first time but liberal use of something like Liquid Wrench, PB-BLASTER, Break Free, or Kroil (no, not WD40) plus a big set of water pump pliers is usually enough. A pipe wrench can be very handy breaking it free the first time.

Derp 07-31-2013 02:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jerry Bransford (Post 4024152)
Not at all. The tie rod can be difficult to rotate the first time but liberal use of something like Liquid Wrench, PB-BLASTER, Break Free, or Kroil (no, not WD40) plus a big set of water pump pliers is usually enough. A pipe wrench can be very handy breaking it free the first time.

I like my large vice grips too! Sometimes I don't feel like getting the pipe wrench out lol

WVU Mountainman 07-31-2013 05:27 PM

Lol!!! Good stuff

tkfx 07-31-2013 05:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jerry Bransford (Post 4024152)
(no, not WD40)

BUT BUT WD40 is the magical cure all liquid!

Landon II 07-31-2013 09:28 PM

Jerry that's a great idea. Thanks
How do you know how to set castor or is it caster.

rdock31 07-31-2013 10:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kjeeper10 (Post 4022758)
What works for me assuming you have tready tires. I screw 2 small screws in the treads-somewhere in the middle of each tire. Hook the tape measure on one, Run across and measure Rotate tires 180 and measure the back side. Really easy to do yourself. Takes 10 minutes or less.

Went this route, works well! Just took a bit to get the tie rod loose. Saved money and learned something new!


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