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-   -   sound bar speaker size... (http://www.wranglerforum.com/f40/sound-bar-speaker-size-32349.html)

ab8140 06-21-2009 09:06 PM

sound bar speaker size...
 
Anyone know the size of the speakers in the sound bar of a 2000 tj?

thanks!

KBR97 06-21-2009 09:12 PM

5 1/4"

AzTJ 06-22-2009 12:18 AM

6.5" speakers will fit as well.

Jma20a 06-22-2009 11:30 AM

what speakers are you looking into getting?

cfreelv711 06-22-2009 11:02 PM

6 1/2 in sound bar
 
http://i305.photobucket.com/albums/n...g?t=1245729503

factory 5 1/4 verses 6 1/2 200watt MOMO. sure it "fits" . Sounds great but no grill to fit yet

ab8140 06-23-2009 08:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jma20a (Post 390782)
what speakers are you looking into getting?


Might just get something on the the cheap thats better than the blown stockers I have now...

Kicker 07DS5250 5-1/4" 2-way car speakers at Crutchfield.com

Jma20a 06-23-2009 11:56 AM

for a few bucks more i suggest these infinity kappa speakers. they will sound better than those kickers and its worth spending a few extra bucks. ebay has a great price here is the crutchfield link and the ebay link.

Infinity Kappa 52.9i 5-1/4" 2-way car speakers at Crutchfield.com

INFINITY KAPPA 52.9i 5.25-INCH CAR AUDIO SPEAKERS - eBay (item 300316797939 end time Jul-20-09 12:00:22 PDT)

ab8140 06-23-2009 01:09 PM

^^ Thanks man.. those look nice!

Jma20a 06-24-2009 04:13 PM

if you want to dish out the money you can go with a component system. for around $125 you can get the kappa components on ebay.

do you plan on replacing your stock headunit?

Jerry Bransford 06-26-2009 05:12 PM

Without an auxillary amplifier, many aftermarket speakers will sound like crap because they require more power to drive them properly than the factory head unit is capable of providing. Most aftermarket speakers require more power to make them sound good so when you turn up the factory head unit louder which isn't usually powerful enough to put out much more power, it often just starts distorting if you're not careful which aftermarket speaker you install.

What you want to do is select the speaker with the highest "Sensitivity" rating which will be expressed in dB (decibels). A speaker with a 91 dB Sensitivity rating will sound noticably louder at the same power from the amplifier than a speaker with an 88 dB rating will. Conversely, a speaker with a 91 dB Sensitivity rating, for example, can get long with an amplifier at roughly half of the power than a speaker with the reduced 88 (again for example) dB Sensitivity rating will.

So with a stock radio that won't produce a lot of power, I'd be FAR happier with a moderately priced speaker with a 90 dB Sensitivity rating than an uber-expensive high-end speaker with only an 87 dB (for example) sensitivity rating. Generally speaking and everything else being nearly the same, the speaker with a higher sensitivity rating will sound better than a speaker with a lower sensitivity when talking stock power OE amplifiers or radios.

Put another way... a speaker with a 91 dB Sensitivity rating being driven with a 15 RMS watt amplifier will sound about the same as a speaker with an 88 dB Sensitivity rating being driven by a 30 RMS watt amplifier... everything else being equal. :)

Jma20a 06-27-2009 02:42 PM

it also depends on the independence of the speaker, the lower the ohms the more power it will be able to use.

Jerry Bransford 06-27-2009 04:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jma20a (Post 393299)
it also depends on the independence of the speaker, the lower the ohms the more power it will be able to use.

You can't simply say the lower the impedance the speaker the more power the amplifiier will put out. Doing that will most likely cause problems since installing a lower impedance speaker than the amplifier was designed to work into can make the amplifier unstable.

If the amplifier's output circuit is designed for, say, 8 ohm speakers, running 4 ohm speakers instead can just cause instability problems for the amplifier. That's like saying to run a 6 volt light in a 12 volt circuit. Run the speaker impedence the amplifier was designed for, nothing else. If the amplifier says to run 4 ohm speakers, don't run 2 ohm speakers in hopes of more power. :)


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