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-   -   So many lift options...makes my head hurt. (http://www.wranglerforum.com/f282/so-many-lift-options-makes-my-head-hurt-363570.html)

Dondo 10-28-2013 04:38 PM

So many lift options...makes my head hurt.
 
Have a stock 2000 Wrangler. I would like to lift it and put larger tires/wheels on it. I've searched, Googled, Binged, and talked with folks and I'm really no closer to figuring out what the best option is. My initial thought was a 2.5" suspension lift with 1" body lift, then a set of the packaged Procomp tires and wheels in the 33" variety. Then I read posts about dropping the transfer case, motor mount lifts, tires rubbing under flex and not being able to turn the front wheels. I have about $1700 (or so) that I'm willing to spend on tires and a lift, but now I'm questioning my choice. To be honest, the jeep will be a city jeep. I hope to wheel it on mild to moderate trails someday, but it will mostly be a take the top off, load the kids up, and goto the Sonic Drive In.

I read that Rough Country is a decent lift, then I read that some folks will never use them again. I've read about folks warning that if you mess with a body lift, often times it introduces more problems.

So, my question is, if someone here had a stock TJ with $1700 to spend on making it look like a capable jeep, what lift, what tires and what brands would you use? Back spacing requirements etc?

Pieter

jeepers29 10-28-2013 04:43 PM

Look into Tertaflex, BDS, or Zone. I went with a Currie lift but that is past your budget. I was not impressed with most of the reviews on Rough country, sky jacker and the other low cost lifts. As far as tires, Duratracs are very popular, but only have a 2 ply sidewall. I will be going with BFG AT/KO's for the 3 ply sidewall as I only get to play in rocks here in central Texas. Backspace I do believe is about 4".

Dextreme 10-28-2013 04:57 PM

I went the route of 33" Duratracs and Zone 4.25" combo for less than $1500 total....very happy and no tc drop! It is mostly a daily driver, but it sees some dirt, high desert, and sand dunes occasionally.

Water Dog 10-28-2013 05:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dextreme (Post 5716242)
I went the route of 33" Duratracs and Zone 4.25" combo for less than $1500 total....very happy and no tc drop! It is mostly a daily driver, but it sees some dirt, high desert, and sand dunes occasionally.

X2...Given your budget and the fact that it includes tires and wheels, I agree that a Zone combo lift would be the way to get the most bang for the buck, and still wind up with decent parts.

InvictusDecretum 10-29-2013 12:02 AM

They really should pay me for this... haha

TeraFlex Tech: Choosing a Lift for your Jeep - YouTube

That helped me out a lot in determining the different TYPES of lifts. I feel like I'm spamming the forum with this link a lot, but I found it on here, and it really did help me.

WredTJ 10-29-2013 09:26 AM

I was advised that anything over 2" will risk you into maybe needing SY and MM.

So I stayed at a 2" Teraflex and happy with it so far.

I would suggest maybe starting with your total project size then lift size then brand.

Dondo 10-29-2013 01:34 PM

Thanks for the replies everyone. This is what I've starting looking at.

Lift:
http://zoneoffroad.com/zone-offroad-...wrangler/j2-j3

Good, bad, enough for 33s on city streets?

I'm still working in the tire thing. The he Procomp package from Quadratec is pretty tempting.

Dextreme 10-29-2013 01:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dondo (Post 5737922)
Thanks for the replies everyone. This is what I've starting looking at.

Lift:
97-06 Jeep Wrangler TJ - Zone Offroad 3" Suspension Lift Kit J2/J3

Good, bad, enough for 33s on city streets?

I'm still working in the tire thing. The he Procomp package from Quadratec is pretty tempting.

Lots of people have that 3" kit and love it...but the 4.25" kit is a step better and here is why. The 3" has a TC drop, the 4.25" combo does not need it because the combo comes with a 1" MML to get the driveline angles correct. So you will have additional belly clearance with the 4.25" combo.

Many will get the 3" and then plan to do the BL/MML later..but if you compare costs, its cheaper just to get it with the 4.25" combo to start with.

Just somethings to consider...just like I did. :beerdrinking:

oh and as far are 33" tires..check tirerack.com and discounttire.com

NJO 10-29-2013 02:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dondo (Post 5715810)
Have a stock 2000 Wrangler. I would like to lift it and put larger tires/wheels on it. I've searched, Googled, Binged, and talked with folks and I'm really no closer to figuring out what the best option is. My initial thought was a 2.5" suspension lift with 1" body lift, then a set of the packaged Procomp tires and wheels in the 33" variety. Then I read posts about dropping the transfer case, motor mount lifts, tires rubbing under flex and not being able to turn the front wheels. I have about $1700 (or so) that I'm willing to spend on tires and a lift, but now I'm questioning my choice. To be honest, the jeep will be a city jeep. I hope to wheel it on mild to moderate trails someday, but it will mostly be a take the top off, load the kids up, and goto the Sonic Drive In.

I read that Rough Country is a decent lift, then I read that some folks will never use them again. I've read about folks warning that if you mess with a body lift, often times it introduces more problems.

So, my question is, if someone here had a stock TJ with $1700 to spend on making it look like a capable jeep, what lift, what tires and what brands would you use? Back spacing requirements etc?

Pieter

Your initial thought is spot on.....doing a 2-2.5" suspension lift with a 1" BL is the way to go. And it can be done on your budget too without the need for a SYE kit etc.

If this is mostly a city jeep make sure you stick with 33x10.5's(well even if it was a true dual purpose vehicle Id still say the same).

My favorite all purpose tire is the BFG AT/KO's. Smooth on road, great wet/snow traction, and plenty aggressive for the occasional off roading adventure too. Plus they are very durable and will last a LONG TIME. Its still the gold standard AT tire to this day. You can pick up a set of em at tirerack.com for about $600 after rebate.

THat would leave you about $1000 left for the lift. If ride quality is key, then look at OME's kit. It runs about $700, and you will have your choice of multiple spring rates and 2 different sets of shocks to choose from depending on how you want the ride to handle. It also comes with a rear TB relocation bracket(to properly center your rear axle and to eliminate rear bumpsteer effect), and the proper rear 20mm bumpstop extensions needed. Also comes with a new steering stabilizer as well. THat would leave you $300 for a quality body lift and motor mount lift.

Daystar makes the best 1" body lift. Instead of just adding cheap spacers on top of your most likely worn out body bushings, the Daystar kit comes with a full set of bushings that fully replace the exsisting ones you have. Its about $150. That would leave you $150 left over. $100 can go to the Browndog 1" motor mount(which again fully replaces your existing worn motor mounts)with gives you a choice of a poly or rubber bushing(rubber preferred for better vibration isolation). $50 left can be put towards a 1" steering riser column. M.O.R.E. makes it. Keeps the steering column u joints at factory alignment, keeps the linear feel of the steering and long term will reduce wear and tear.

Yep, this way might be a bit more expensive than the typical "zone"/BDS kits etc, but you get what you pay for, and the stuff mentioned here is top notch quality which will make a difference for the riding manners both short and long term.

fattirewilly 10-29-2013 09:18 PM

I agree with the 2.5" lift plus 1" body lift. The body lift opens the door for easier tummy tuck etc. down the road. You also might get away without a SYE/CV drive shaft. OME is a great option.

I suggest calling Dirk at DPG offroad. He can walk you through all the options and get you set without taxing your mind too much.

Dondo 10-29-2013 10:02 PM

Thanks everyone. I've taken some notes here. Hopefully I can come up with something. I'll process some of this and might come back with a few more questions. Thanks again for the help!

Pieter

Megadethx 10-30-2013 09:54 AM

I really like the looks of the Zone combo lift. It's the one I would like to buy but my stock control arms are shot so i would need those too.

Should i just bite the bullet and get a 4 inch w/arms and get the SYE?

So many lifts, and like OP, my head is swimming.

Ironhead Jed 10-30-2013 10:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Megadethx (Post 5758866)
I really like the looks of the Zone combo lift. It's the one I would like to buy but my stock control arms are shot so i would need those too.

Should i just bite the bullet and get a 4 inch w/arms and get the SYE?

So many lifts, and like OP, my head is swimming.

no, you do not want arms from any budget lift kit. that is where the kits differ the most and 99% of the time the oem arms offer more flex

Shark_13 10-30-2013 10:40 AM

If you have the funds, savvy double adjustable or metal cloak seem to be the top dogs for adjustable control arms....

SEAICE 10-31-2013 09:51 AM

Great advice here, conservative on the tire size though. Given your intended use, you could go with a wider tire, a 33x12.50 on a 15X9 wheel with the proper offset.

Quote:

Originally Posted by NJO (Post 5739562)
Your initial thought is spot on.....doing a 2-2.5" suspension lift with a 1" BL is the way to go. And it can be done on your budget too without the need for a SYE kit etc.

If this is mostly a city jeep make sure you stick with 33x10.5's(well even if it was a true dual purpose vehicle Id still say the same).

My favorite all purpose tire is the BFG AT/KO's. Smooth on road, great wet/snow traction, and plenty aggressive for the occasional off roading adventure too. Plus they are very durable and will last a LONG TIME. Its still the gold standard AT tire to this day. You can pick up a set of em at tirerack.com for about $600 after rebate.

THat would leave you about $1000 left for the lift. If ride quality is key, then look at OME's kit. It runs about $700, and you will have your choice of multiple spring rates and 2 different sets of shocks to choose from depending on how you want the ride to handle. It also comes with a rear TB relocation bracket(to properly center your rear axle and to eliminate rear bumpsteer effect), and the proper rear 20mm bumpstop extensions needed. Also comes with a new steering stabilizer as well. THat would leave you $300 for a quality body lift and motor mount lift.

Daystar makes the best 1" body lift. Instead of just adding cheap spacers on top of your most likely worn out body bushings, the Daystar kit comes with a full set of bushings that fully replace the exsisting ones you have. Its about $150. That would leave you $150 left over. $100 can go to the Browndog 1" motor mount(which again fully replaces your existing worn motor mounts)with gives you a choice of a poly or rubber bushing(rubber preferred for better vibration isolation). $50 left can be put towards a 1" steering riser column. M.O.R.E. makes it. Keeps the steering column u joints at factory alignment, keeps the linear feel of the steering and long term will reduce wear and tear.

Yep, this way might be a bit more expensive than the typical "zone"/BDS kits etc, but you get what you pay for, and the stuff mentioned here is top notch quality which will make a difference for the riding manners both short and long term.


NJO 10-31-2013 10:00 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SEAICE (Post 5783914)
Great advice here, conservative on the tire size though. Given your intended use, you could go with a wider tire, a 33x12.50 on a 15X9 wheel with the proper offset.

Wider/heavier tires and rims offer no real benefits at all. In fact there are a number of detriments to using them.

jp2611 10-31-2013 10:04 AM

3 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by SEAICE (Post 5783914)
Great advice here, conservative on the tire size though. Given your intended use, you could go with a wider tire, a 33x12.50 on a 15X9 wheel with the proper offset.

OOps should have done multi quote on this but it never works right for me...anyway if you want to know what the OME and JKS BL and MML look like with Duratracs 33"s that are 12.50" on 15" cragar soft 8s here ya go..I have added an SYE next step TT...and new front fenders

Yes I do wheel mine and it is great on and off road..the white jeep next to me is also a Forum member and he is on 35"s with a 2.5 puck lift...he has a sawzall..... :)

Dondo 11-02-2013 11:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jp2611 (Post 5784234)
OOps should have done multi quote on this but it never works right for me...anyway if you want to know what the OME and JKS BL and MML look like with Duratracs 33"s that are 12.50" on 15" cragar soft 8s here ya go..I have added an SYE next step TT...and new front fenders Yes I do wheel mine and it is great on and off road..the white jeep next to me is also a Forum member and he is on 35"s with a 2.5 puck lift...he has a sawzall..... :)

Thanks everyone, really good info on here. Few more questions just so I know what this means:
OME = Old Man Emu (a brand of suspension lift)
JKS BL = some brand of body lift?
MML = ?
SYE = I've seen is before but I'm not positive what it stands for.
TT = transfer case something or other?

And, since I have read that backspaces are important, what should I look for? Does it depend on the width of the tire/wheel combo I choose?

Pieter

Ironhead Jed 11-02-2013 12:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dondo (Post 5839058)

Thanks everyone, really good info on here. Few more questions just so I know what this means:
OME = Old Man Emu (a brand of suspension lift)
JKS BL = some brand of body lift?
MML = ?
SYE = I've seen is before but I'm not positive what it stands for.
TT = transfer case something or other?

And, since I have read that backspaces are important, what should I look for? Does it depend on the width of the tire/wheel combo I choose?

Pieter

Jks is a company and they do make body lifts

MML is a motor mount lift

Sye is a slip yolk eliminator, also requires a cv driveshaft. Its needed to eliminate drive line vibes when the difference between your tc and diffs becomes more than ~2.5" over stock

TT is a tummy tuck. Raises the tc and trans up for better ground clearance.

Generally, between 3.75" and 4" is appropriate back spacing for a 12.5" wide tire

Water Dog 11-02-2013 12:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dondo (Post 5839058)
Thanks everyone, really good info on here. Few more questions just so I know what this means:
OME = Old Man Emu (a brand of suspension lift)
JKS BL = some brand of body lift?
MML = ?
SYE = I've seen is before but I'm not positive what it stands for.
TT = transfer case something or other?

And, since I have read that backspaces are important, what should I look for? Does it depend on the width of the tire/wheel combo I choose?

Pieter

JKS is a company, MML=motor mount lift, SYE=slip yoke eliminator (it replaces the slip yoke on the back of your transfer case with a fixed yoke which allows for a longer drive shaft (less angle) and is used with a double carden drive shaft), TT=Tummy tuck which raises your transfer case and uses a high clearance skid plate in place of the stock one.

If you are buying after market wheels, try and get backspacing of 3.75" to 4" (these are ideal). 4.25" will work, but it's close, and less than 3.75 will work but just makes your tires stick out further from under the fenders.

SEAICE 11-02-2013 12:22 PM

I don't disagree. Just offering a suggestion. For his likely use, I don't think 12.50 will be an impairment. As to weight, depends on the tires, but it is a non-issue if you pay attention to what you're buying...a 33x12.50x15 TSL Swamper weighs 1 lb more than the 33x10.50x15 (56vs55lbs). Same for the wheels. An MT Classic II in 15x8 weighs 20lbs, in 15x10, it's 22.

Quote:

Originally Posted by NJO (Post 5784098)
Wider/heavier tires and rims offer no real benefits at all. In fact there are a number of detriments to using them.


tj00wrangler 11-02-2013 05:48 PM

I've run 33x12.50 Toyo Mt on a 15x8 steel wheels. A tire and steel wheel has a weight of 100lbs. I've been running the Toyo's for just over 5 yrs and will be replacing them in about a month or two with a lighter wheel and tire.

KBR97 11-02-2013 07:30 PM

You could also piece together your lift. Buy springs from OME, buy shocks from bilstein, by bumpstops from whoever offers best deal. Metalcloak track bar...ect. Look for sales and who ever offers best pricing on certain parts. I wish I would have done it like that years ago. I wouldn't be changing practically everything I originally did.

DavidW954 11-03-2013 03:01 AM

My use sounds a lot like the OP. I've got 2" Old Man Emu springs and Rubicon Express Monotube shocks with Rubicon Express 2" Bumpstop Extensions front and rear. No body lift or Motor Mount Lift. It lets me run 15x8 Procomp 1069 wheels and BF Goodrich 33x12.50 All -Terrain. I also have Crown Automotive extended fender flares. No vibes and nothing rubs.

Limestone 12-17-2013 07:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by NJO (Post 5739562)
Your initial thought is spot on.....doing a 2-2.5" suspension lift with a 1" BL is the way to go. And it can be done on your budget too without the need for a SYE kit etc.

If this is mostly a city jeep make sure you stick with 33x10.5's(well even if it was a true dual purpose vehicle Id still say the same).

My favorite all purpose tire is the BFG AT/KO's. Smooth on road, great wet/snow traction, and plenty aggressive for the occasional off roading adventure too. Plus they are very durable and will last a LONG TIME. Its still the gold standard AT tire to this day. You can pick up a set of em at tirerack.com for about $600 after rebate.

THat would leave you about $1000 left for the lift. If ride quality is key, then look at OME's kit. It runs about $700, and you will have your choice of multiple spring rates and 2 different sets of shocks to choose from depending on how you want the ride to handle. It also comes with a rear TB relocation bracket(to properly center your rear axle and to eliminate rear bumpsteer effect), and the proper rear 20mm bumpstop extensions needed. Also comes with a new steering stabilizer as well. THat would leave you $300 for a quality body lift and motor mount lift.

Daystar makes the best 1" body lift. Instead of just adding cheap spacers on top of your most likely worn out body bushings, the Daystar kit comes with a full set of bushings that fully replace the exsisting ones you have. Its about $150. That would leave you $150 left over. $100 can go to the Browndog 1" motor mount(which again fully replaces your existing worn motor mounts)with gives you a choice of a poly or rubber bushing(rubber preferred for better vibration isolation). $50 left can be put towards a 1" steering riser column. M.O.R.E. makes it. Keeps the steering column u joints at factory alignment, keeps the linear feel of the steering and long term will reduce wear and tear.

Yep, this way might be a bit more expensive than the typical "zone"/BDS kits etc, but you get what you pay for, and the stuff mentioned here is top notch quality which will make a difference for the riding manners both short and long term.

Here

Slik 76 12-17-2013 07:42 PM

Anyone mention flat fenders? I run a 4.5 long arm AEV (not for you), but I have metal cloak flat fenders. Wow what a difference on what you can run. Way less lift is required. Most of my buds running AEV or formerly Nth Degree. Great stuff, but expensive. If you like a flat fender look, metal cloak is quality stuff.

Attachment 597089


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