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virginian 01-10-2011 12:21 AM

Photography Suggestions
 
Moving closer to my roadtrip to bring the TJ to Brooklyn from Seattle--less than a week and counting. I picked up a Panasonic Lumix LX5 to capture the journey as it's not as bulky as a DSLR and therefore, will probably be used more. However, it's much better all around than my trusty old SD790.

I can choose to shoot in RAW or JPEG mode for the trip.

My question to the seasoned photogs out there is: should I shoot in all RAW so that I have a better final product or just sit with JPEG? I'm not SURE that I'll master my GIMP software, but I feel like RAW will give me more options once I get back. Also, if I shoot in RAW, am I limited if I, at first, just want to upload pics to Flickr or imageshack etc; that is, can I convert RAW back to JPEG?

Pretty psyched about my new toy. Also psyched about the new camera.

matthewryan11 01-10-2011 02:03 AM

Usually you can use processing software to convert RAW format to JPEG. I was looking at the specs on the panasonic website, it looks like you can shoot in RAW and JPEG so that may be the easier route even though it does take up more memory. That is how I shoot with my camera, you can always delete anything you don't want for Flikr, Etc.

Have fun with both your new toys!

matthewryan11 01-10-2011 02:22 AM

Oh, and I definitely know what you mean about using the premium compact camera more than a DSLR. I have a DSLR and a Canon powershot G10 and I tend to use the powershot more often mostly due to its size. It usually hangs out either locked in my glovebox in the jeep(A tuffy glovebox) or is in the big inside pocket of my vest when I'm on the motorcycle.

If you plan on going through S.D. on your travels you should go see Mt. Rushmore. it is fantastically beautiful.

baja 01-10-2011 06:30 AM

It is a must for our family to take the young-uns to see Mt Rushmore.Last time out we spent the coin and took a helicopter tour.It was truly awesome.If I could afford to,we move out to Rapid City.

jeffk42 01-10-2011 06:39 AM

RAW will give you a lot more latitude in post-processing, allowing more manipulation before clipping occurs. If you're a person that maybe just makes minor corrections (if any) before uploading them somewhere, then JPG is the easier choice.

On the other hand, if you carefully hand-tweak every photo to get the best possible image out of it, then RAW is the best option. Raw is easily converted to JPG for uploading to flickr, etc.

Geoff@Bestop 01-10-2011 10:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jeffk42 (Post 979133)
RAW will give you a lot more latitude in post-processing, allowing more manipulation before clipping occurs. If you're a person that maybe just makes minor corrections (if any) before uploading them somewhere, then JPG is the easier choice.

On the other hand, if you carefully hand-tweak every photo to get the best possible image out of it, then RAW is the best option. Raw is easily converted to JPG for uploading to flickr, etc.

X2!

The only reason to bother with the hassle of the RAW file size is if you plan to do INTENSE digital darkroom stuff - really get into adjusting color levels, etc.

You can still modify JPG's a lot, just not quite as much.

If you shoot RAW you will fill up your camera, and that frequently means you will get all worried about the number of shots you're taking. And for me, that removes one of the cool things about digital over film: just shooting anything I see without getting all stressed about my tripod, light meters, etc.

Have fun on your trip!!

jeffk42 01-10-2011 10:53 AM

Yeah I'll usually shoot RAW for vacation photos and actual photographs taken for the sake of photography, if that makes sense. Like this:

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2018/...090cc70e8d.jpg

On the other hand, family snapshots, etc. often end up as JPG.

The RAW images for my camera (a Canon 5D Mk II) are about 25MB each, so that adds up quick. :) I have a wallet filled with over a dozen 8GB and 16GB cards for that reason.

McBear 01-10-2011 02:04 PM

My decision tree for RAW is that if I am looking for a well shot "scenic photograph" I shoot RAW, but then I also bring out the tripod and the Olympus E30 DSLR. If the spontaneity of the photo is most important, such as family, parties, gatherings I will shoot with a point and click and JPG.

In the old days my Pentax 6X7 was the DSLR of the day, loaded with 64Ektachrome and my OM-1 thru OM4T was the faster, easier point and shoot loaded with 100-200ASA film.

We won't even talk about the Speed Grafix.

matthewryan11 01-10-2011 04:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by matthewryan11 (Post 979067)
Usually you can use processing software to convert RAW format to JPEG. I was looking at the specs on the panasonic website, it looks like you can shoot in RAW and JPEG so that may be the easier route even though it does take up more memory. That is how I shoot with my camera, you can always delete anything you don't want for Flikr, Etc.

Have fun with both your new toys!

* I meant to say raw and jpeg at the same time

flyin-lowe 01-10-2011 07:05 PM

Not that some great pictures aren't taken with point and shoots ( I am not bashing them at all) but,if you are taking the type of photographs that you are going to be doing some serious editing on then use the DSLR and shoot in RAW. If you are going to be just snapping some snapshots of the trip then shoot JPEG's. I might be wrong but I would bet that a good photographer with a DSLR can shoot JPEGS that will be a better finished product then RAW edited images with a point and shoot. That said it is not always about the equipment. I have seen a cell phone pic on a photo forum that you would swear was taken with a several thousand dollar camera.

virginian 01-10-2011 07:47 PM

Thanks everyone. My natural reaction when I hear things like "light meters" means that I should probably frame a good shot and just accept my jpeg status in photography life.

When I had my D40, the pictures I ended up were incredible, but with the bulky (for what I'm used to) kit lens, I didn't take it with me all that often. Had I invested three hundy in the 50mm lens, I probably would have taken it with me a lot more.

5 days to go...:)

navret 01-10-2011 07:55 PM

wow the only things in this thread i understand is mcbears aim and shoot, and i have heard of pentex. does this mean my polaroid "swinger" is dated? sounds like a great trip cross country.

virginian 01-10-2011 08:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by matthewryan11 (Post 979068)

If you plan on going through S.D. on your travels you should go see Mt. Rushmore. it is fantastically beautiful.

Not this round--WA, ID, MT, WY, CO, KS, OK, AR, TN, VA, MD, PA, NJ, and finally the BQE for the final stretch.

I'm pretty sure it's going to be a blast so I plan on doing it again some time this summer and Rushmore would be on that list. The second time might be in the gf's hybrid civic at 48mpg...

navret 01-10-2011 09:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by virginian (Post 980582)
Not this round--WA, ID, MT, WY, CO, KS, OK, AR, TN, VA, MD, PA, NJ, and finally the BQE for the final stretch.

I'm pretty sure it's going to be a blast so I plan on doing it again some time this summer and Rushmore would be on that list. The second time might be in the gf's hybrid civic at 48mpg...

not exactly trying for a straight line are you? when you hit 95, don't forget to stop a cracker barrel for some good eats. lots of traffic around DC.

jeffk42 01-11-2011 06:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by McBear (Post 979823)
My decision tree for RAW is that if I am looking for a well shot "scenic photograph" I shoot RAW, but then I also bring out the tripod and the Olympus E30 DSLR. If the spontaneity of the photo is most important, such as family, parties, gatherings I will shoot with a point and click and JPG.

In the old days my Pentax 6X7 was the DSLR of the day, loaded with 64Ektachrome and my OM-1 thru OM4T was the faster, easier point and shoot loaded with 100-200ASA film.

We won't even talk about the Speed Grafix.

I have an OM-4T as well. Sadly, it doesn't get used any more. When I saw that you can hardly get $200 for them lately, I decided to just keep it. What a great camera though. Best film camera I ever had.

virginian 01-11-2011 10:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by navret (Post 980725)
not exactly trying for a straight line are you? when you hit 95, don't forget to stop a cracker barrel for some good eats. lots of traffic around DC.

I'm adding about 900 extra miles so I can visit friends from grad school along the way. Living in NYC, everyone eventually comes to visit you but it's not often that I'm able to hit up friends from Memphis etc.

You don't have to school me on Cracker Barrel--I'm very familiar with the Cherry Pancake Coma especially when I combine it with some kind of breakfast meat.

McBear 01-11-2011 02:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jeffk42 (Post 981378)
I have an OM-4T as well. Sadly, it doesn't get used any more. When I saw that you can hardly get $200 for them lately, I decided to just keep it. What a great camera though. Best film camera I ever had.

That is the problem with progress. I have three OM bodies, seven lenses, bellows and shift for 35 and have only used it three times in the past two years [macro work and the shift once]. Then it is off to the scanner for that extra step.

Once Kodachrome passed this last month the ability to shoot 25ASA/ISO went away and super fine resolution with it.

Now my backpack consists of an Olympus E3, E30, three zooms, two fixed lenses, extra flash, remote and a laptop, all hooked to a Bogen 3040/3047 tripod. It is why I call the LJ my rolling tripod. I need the extra room for all my stuff.


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