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-   -   oh oh anyone had this problem? (http://www.wranglerforum.com/f274/oh-oh-anyone-had-this-problem-79883.html)

NEWWRANGLEROLDCJ7 02-11-2011 08:54 PM

oh oh anyone had this problem?
 
or is it really a problem??

Nearly 900 Jeep Wrangler owners have filed complaints with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) over the last two years about fuel "spit-back" during fill-ups. Consumers also are reporting the problem in other Chrysler and Dodge models, according to an Edmunds analysis of complaints NHTSA's Office of Defects Investigation (ODI).
According to the complaints, the fuel system does not respond to a shut-off mechanism. Gasoline overflows the tank, sometimes in a spill and sometimes in a spray.
Chrysler has recalled more than 45,000 2005 Dodge Durango models for the problem, and said it had resolved the issue with its fuel-tank supplier. In August 2010, citing 217 complaints, NHTSA opened an inquiry into a similar problem in the 2007 and 2008 Jeep Wrangler. Between January 2009 and January 2011, 891 owners of 2005-2010 Jeep Wranglers filed fuel spit-back complaints with NHTSA. The majority of those reports concerned the 2007 and 2008 model years.
In one complaint filed last month with the federal agency, the owner of a 2005 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited said the vehicle "has an overfilling problem every single time I fill up at the gas station."
"It doesn't matter if I use the lowest setting on the gas pump or if I manually use as little pressure as possible," the owner wrote. "It overfills every single time and gas pours out of the fill spout running down the body of the vehicle on my hand on my clothes and on the ground."
The owner of a 2007 Chrysler Sebring reported that "during refueling, when the fuel nozzle stops, there was an overflow of fuel spaying out of the fuel tank neck. The vehicle was taken to an authorized dealer where they informed that the fuel tank assembly would need to be replaced. The vehicle was in the process of being repaired."
In August 2009, Jeep issued a technical service bulletin for the 2007 and 2008 Wrangler.
It said that consumers were noting that it was hard to fill their vehicles, or that they had to fill them at a very slow rate. The bulletin does not specifically mention fuel spit-back, however. Jeep said it would replace the vent line tube vent line filter, vent line and recirculation line. The problem was that the vent system was not able to provide enough tank ventilation, according to the bulletin.
http://www.autoobserver.com/assets_c...x404-77594.jpgIn October 2010, Chrysler responded to the NHTSA's request for information about the problem. It said it had been made aware of complaints about fuel spills for 191 vehicles (including six in which legal claims had been filed). It noted that "it is possible for fuel spills to occur as a result of users erroneously overfilling a fuel tank by continuing to fill after the automatic shut off mechanism kicks in."
"It is not possible to discern how many of the subject vehicle complaints are a result of user error," Chrysler said. "Such complaints are obviously not a result of a vehicle design issue." And because there was "not a single allegation of crash, fire, property damage or injury" as a result of the spit-backs, there was no safety defect, the automaker said. It told the agency that it should close the investigation.
In its reply, Chrysler said that the only "plausible" explanation for the spit-backs was that the fuel system in the affected cars had been exposed to gasoline with ethanol levels of more than 10 percent -- a higher percentage than the system was designed to handle. In the presence of higher levels of ethanol, components in the inlet check valve (ICV) can swell, causing it to stick and fail to close properly, Chrysler said.
Coincidentally, the Environmental Protection Agency in January waived a limitation on selling gasoline that contains more than 10 percent ethanol for model year 2001 through 2006 passenger vehicles, including cars, SUVs and light pickup trucks. The waiver applies to gasoline that contains up to 15 percent ethanol, known as E15.
Despite Chrysler's call for an end to the investigation for the 2007 and 2008 Jeep Wrangler, it is still open. Complaints of fuel spit-back peaked in January with 211 complaints across Chrysler, Dodge and Jeep brands, according to Edmunds analyst Panee Segal, who studies the NHTSA complaint database. Most of the reports pertain to the Jeep Wrangler.
"There has been a continuous and increasing amount of complaints submitted month to month on this topic and we feel this should be brought to consumers' attention," said Segal, part of the team that does the monthly analysis of complaints that can be found at the Edmunds AutoObserver Data Center.
Federal investigators might be receiving more reports about the issue because some Jeep Wrangler owners are using social media to encourage reporting of the problem. Wrangler spit-back has been discussed in the Edmunds 2008 Jeep Wrangler discussion forum. There is a Facebook page dedicated to the issue. Both that page and a post at JeepForum.com encourage vehicle owners to submit complaints to federal investigators.
http://www.autoobserver.com/assets_c...x528-77596.jpgThe Facebook page's creator, Rod LaFleur, has posted videos of overflows in his 2005 Jeep Wrangler TJ Unlimited on YouTube to document the problem. The videos include a link so owners can file a complaint with the federal agency.
LaFleur, who lives in Chicago and commutes 60 miles a day, said he has filed complaints about the problem with both Chrysler and federal safety investigators. He estimates that he loses 2 to 5 ounces of gasoline every time he fills up. To avoid being splashed, "I make sure I'm far enough away and I make sure no one is standing by it," he said.
He said Chrysler has not offered to replace his fuel tank, and he said that unless there's a design change, Chrysler would only be "replacing one defectively designed part with another defectively designed one."
Chrysler said in its reply to federal investigators that despite its belief that there was no design defect in the Wrangler's inlet check valve, it was going to make changes to it.
Chrysler said it was "working toward a more robust ICV design for production and service that is planned to be implemented in Feb. 2011" to accommodate the swell that apparently occurs in the presence of ethanol levels above 10 percent.
Edmunds analyst Segal, meanwhile, questions why the federal government's previous recall was limited to the 2005 Dodge Durango and why the current investigation only concerns the 2007 and 2008 Jeep Wrangler.
Whether or not other Chrysler-branded vehicles have the same fuel-tank system as the 2007-2008 Jeep Wrangler, Segal said that federal investigators should extend their inquiry to the 2006 to 2009 Dodge Durango, all model years of the Jeep Wrangler and other Chrysler vehicles that have been the subject of consumer complaints of fuel spit-back.
In an e-mail, NHTSA said that its investigation into the issue "is still active."
"In many investigations, NHTSA looks at peer vehicles to see if they experience similar issues," the agency said. "If the agency's assessment indicates similar problems in other vehicles, NHTSA will take action to ensure they are remedied." It said any new information would be posted on its Web site, safercar.gov.
Chrysler spokesman Vince Muniga said that the automaker is "cooperating fully" with NHSTA's investigation. "And until the investigation is closed, we can't get into any details," he said.
Carroll Lachnit: is Edmunds.com Features Editor

teknoid 02-11-2011 09:11 PM

A LOT of people have this problem. I'm one of the '05 owners who has filed a complaint. Irritating as hell.

rics1997 02-11-2011 09:12 PM

Yes most know about this. There is a simple work around of not topping off. When the gas first clicks off don't pull the trigger again. It is one of those things we can file a complaint but until they address it then we can just not worry about putting that last couple ounces in.

teknoid 02-11-2011 09:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rics1997 (Post 1050345)
Yes most know about this. There is a simple work around of not topping off. When the gas first clicks off don't pull the trigger again. It is one of those things we can file a complaint but until they address it then we can just not worry about putting that last couple ounces in.

This "workaround" doesn't "work" if the gas spits out at the FIRST cutoff (like mine does). The only thing I can do is slow WAY down when I think it's getting close to full. It seems to work most of the time. Wrong guess = splash!

NEWWRANGLEROLDCJ7 02-11-2011 09:26 PM

have they sorted it out for the 2011's yet????

Texas TC 02-11-2011 09:27 PM

I had this problem on my 2007 JK and the dealer worked with me with several "fixes". The repair that actually worked was changing out the fuel tank. It was diagnosed that the rollover valve was sticking and not operating properly. Ironically, the repair lasted a couple of years and then it started to overflow during fueling again. I had an appointment set up to change the tank a second time when I traded for my 2011 JK.

Texas TC 02-11-2011 09:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by NEWWRANGLEROLDCJ7 (Post 1050376)
have they sorted it out for the 2011's yet????

I have not had a problem with my 2011.

NEWWRANGLEROLDCJ7 02-11-2011 09:31 PM

glad to hear its been sorted out, I feel bad for the folks that have to deal with that crap. This is the first I have ever heard of it.. wow, what a drag.

4 Jeep Family 02-11-2011 11:50 PM

No problem with my 2011. Getting gas tank changed by dealer on my 2008 for $125.00. You have to call Chrysler and tell them. If Chrysler OKs it, they will call the dealer.

Entoxicated 02-12-2011 12:21 AM

I actually have this problem with my 95 YJ... once i hear it start to fill up to the top (like poring water in a bottle and listening to the change in sound right before it reaches the top) I quickly squeeze to release the lock and let go

jeffk42 02-12-2011 06:33 AM

No problem on my 2011 either. Well, except for the cost. :D

Hilldweller 02-12-2011 06:36 AM

My 2008 spits about 25% of the time. You have to babysit it; don't go in the station for a lotto ticket or a pee. Could come back to $100 worth of fuel on the ground.

Mac2411 02-12-2011 07:07 AM

I've heard about this before but have not had this problem on my 2010. Hope I don't.

Renees05 02-12-2011 08:29 AM

I have this problem with my 05 Unlimited. I listen when fueling and when it sounds like it's getting full, I stop. Ticks me off that I don't think my tank is ever full!

SnowBlast 02-18-2011 06:15 PM

Just filed my complaints for my 05 Rubicon. Got a call from Jeep today to take it in for diagnostics and let them know what the problem is. I said I think we both know what the problem is and they denied knowledge the open NHTSA investigation. What a joke!

repoman100 02-18-2011 09:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by NEWWRANGLEROLDCJ7
or is it really a problem??

Nearly 900 Jeep Wrangler owners have filed complaints with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) over the last two years about fuel "spit-back" during fill-ups. Consumers also are reporting the problem in other Chrysler and Dodge models, according to an Edmunds analysis of complaints NHTSA's Office of Defects Investigation (ODI).
According to the complaints, the fuel system does not respond to a shut-off mechanism. Gasoline overflows the tank, sometimes in a spill and sometimes in a spray.
Chrysler has recalled more than 45,000 2005 Dodge Durango models for the problem, and said it had resolved the issue with its fuel-tank supplier. In August 2010, citing 217 complaints, NHTSA opened an inquiry into a similar problem in the 2007 and 2008 Jeep Wrangler. Between January 2009 and January 2011, 891 owners of 2005-2010 Jeep Wranglers filed fuel spit-back complaints with NHTSA. The majority of those reports concerned the 2007 and 2008 model years.
In one complaint filed last month with the federal agency, the owner of a 2005 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited said the vehicle "has an overfilling problem every single time I fill up at the gas station."
"It doesn't matter if I use the lowest setting on the gas pump or if I manually use as little pressure as possible," the owner wrote. "It overfills every single time and gas pours out of the fill spout running down the body of the vehicle on my hand on my clothes and on the ground."
The owner of a 2007 Chrysler Sebring reported that "during refueling, when the fuel nozzle stops, there was an overflow of fuel spaying out of the fuel tank neck. The vehicle was taken to an authorized dealer where they informed that the fuel tank assembly would need to be replaced. The vehicle was in the process of being repaired."
In August 2009, Jeep issued a technical service bulletin for the 2007 and 2008 Wrangler.
It said that consumers were noting that it was hard to fill their vehicles, or that they had to fill them at a very slow rate. The bulletin does not specifically mention fuel spit-back, however. Jeep said it would replace the vent line tube vent line filter, vent line and recirculation line. The problem was that the vent system was not able to provide enough tank ventilation, according to the bulletin.
In October 2010, Chrysler responded to the NHTSA's request for information about the problem. It said it had been made aware of complaints about fuel spills for 191 vehicles (including six in which legal claims had been filed). It noted that "it is possible for fuel spills to occur as a result of users erroneously overfilling a fuel tank by continuing to fill after the automatic shut off mechanism kicks in."
"It is not possible to discern how many of the subject vehicle complaints are a result of user error," Chrysler said. "Such complaints are obviously not a result of a vehicle design issue." And because there was "not a single allegation of crash, fire, property damage or injury" as a result of the spit-backs, there was no safety defect, the automaker said. It told the agency that it should close the investigation.
In its reply, Chrysler said that the only "plausible" explanation for the spit-backs was that the fuel system in the affected cars had been exposed to gasoline with ethanol levels of more than 10 percent -- a higher percentage than the system was designed to handle. In the presence of higher levels of ethanol, components in the inlet check valve (ICV) can swell, causing it to stick and fail to close properly, Chrysler said.
Coincidentally, the Environmental Protection Agency in January waived a limitation on selling gasoline that contains more than 10 percent ethanol for model year 2001 through 2006 passenger vehicles, including cars, SUVs and light pickup trucks. The waiver applies to gasoline that contains up to 15 percent ethanol, known as E15.
Despite Chrysler's call for an end to the investigation for the 2007 and 2008 Jeep Wrangler, it is still open. Complaints of fuel spit-back peaked in January with 211 complaints across Chrysler, Dodge and Jeep brands, according to Edmunds analyst Panee Segal, who studies the NHTSA complaint database. Most of the reports pertain to the Jeep Wrangler.
"There has been a continuous and increasing amount of complaints submitted month to month on this topic and we feel this should be brought to consumers' attention," said Segal, part of the team that does the monthly analysis of complaints that can be found at the Edmunds AutoObserver Data Center.
Federal investigators might be receiving more reports about the issue because some Jeep Wrangler owners are using social media to encourage reporting of the problem. Wrangler spit-back has been discussed in the Edmunds 2008 Jeep Wrangler discussion forum. There is a Facebook page dedicated to the issue. Both that page and a post at JeepForum.com encourage vehicle owners to submit complaints to federal investigators.
The Facebook page's creator, Rod LaFleur, has posted videos of overflows in his 2005 Jeep Wrangler TJ Unlimited on YouTube to document the problem. The videos include a link so owners can file a complaint with the federal agency.
LaFleur, who lives in Chicago and commutes 60 miles a day, said he has filed complaints about the problem with both Chrysler and federal safety investigators. He estimates that he loses 2 to 5 ounces of gasoline every time he fills up. To avoid being splashed, "I make sure I'm far enough away and I make sure no one is standing by it," he said.
He said Chrysler has not offered to replace his fuel tank, and he said that unless there's a design change, Chrysler would only be "replacing one defectively designed part with another defectively designed one."
Chrysler said in its reply to federal investigators that despite its belief that there was no design defect in the Wrangler's inlet check valve, it was going to make changes to it.
Chrysler said it was "working toward a more robust ICV design for production and service that is planned to be implemented in Feb. 2011" to accommodate the swell that apparently occurs in the presence of ethanol levels above 10 percent.
Edmunds analyst Segal, meanwhile, questions why the federal government's previous recall was limited to the 2005 Dodge Durango and why the current investigation only concerns the 2007 and 2008 Jeep Wrangler.
Whether or not other Chrysler-branded vehicles have the same fuel-tank system as the 2007-2008 Jeep Wrangler, Segal said that federal investigators should extend their inquiry to the 2006 to 2009 Dodge Durango, all model years of the Jeep Wrangler and other Chrysler vehicles that have been the subject of consumer complaints of fuel spit-back.
In an e-mail, NHTSA said that its investigation into the issue "is still active."
"In many investigations, NHTSA looks at peer vehicles to see if they experience similar issues," the agency said. "If the agency's assessment indicates similar problems in other vehicles, NHTSA will take action to ensure they are remedied." It said any new information would be posted on its Web site, safercar.gov.
Chrysler spokesman Vince Muniga said that the automaker is "cooperating fully" with NHSTA's investigation. "And until the investigation is closed, we can't get into any details," he said.
Carroll Lachnit: is Edmunds.com Features Editor

When the gas pump handle clicks once, stop pumping ! As simple as that...

SeaComms 02-18-2011 10:17 PM

Strange, down here I guess the fuel must swirl in the opposite direction or something! Never heard of anyone having probs with the petrol, Mine has never splashed back either and I fill til the first click off, then go another four or 5 times to click off to drip that last litre or two in.

Now the deisel is another story - most of them cant fill at more than 1/4 speed or it just blows back out and shuts off supply. Not that you guys would have this problem since they dont offer you the deisel version!

cremaley 02-19-2011 06:44 AM

Have 12,000 miles on my 2010 Wrangler Sport and have never experienced the spit back problem. Hope I never do!

Renees05 02-19-2011 09:10 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by repoman100 (Post 1065843)
When the gas pump handle clicks once, stop pumping ! As simple as that...

I wish it were that simple but that hasn't been the case with my Jeep. I would let go of it as soon as it clicked off....IF it clicked off. That's the problem.

castorj29 02-19-2011 11:00 AM

My 08 never had any problems until my last few fill ups. Now it burps out about 1/2 gallon of gas. Hmmmm.........thats about $2.00 wasted everytime i need gas.

castorj29 02-19-2011 11:01 AM

Hace to ask yourself.......what would Jesus do

CobraGut 02-23-2011 01:59 PM

hey users. I am willing to gamble that all of you are from the USA There is no complaints in Canada in regards to this, and I will tell you why. ALL of your gas stations are required to have the boot cover on the nozzle, when you insert the nozzle into your filler, this boot thing (that no one can explain its real function or use), doesn't allow the nozzle to fully seat into position. Since it is not allowed to fully seat, you will get that spray. this is not any of the automakers design faults. This is the fault of the gas companies NOT looking at the design of the boot cover properly. Up here in the Great White North, we do not use these boots (again, no one can explain the purpose of these enough to force us to use them)..

so in conclusion. you have two options to cure this.

* ensure that the nozzle is pushed all the way in, then, stand there and hold it in place (maybe this is the reason for the boot, they just hide behind other things)
* contact the gas station and insist that the owner takes a good, long hard look at the design. Anyone with a little bit of Engineering in them can easily see where the fault lies.

It is easy to blame the company that built your car, however it is not their place to correct problems that arise from a poorly designed nozzle boot..

I hope that this helps

I have just learned that CA required these boots to be installed to catch vapor???? I guess I can see that side of the story, but, instead of vapor they are now getting raw fuel spillage (yep, that includes the vapor). I also discovered (i do not know how true this is, so, it is hearsay) that the designer of the product is a stock holder with Shell ... this seems almost too much of a coincidence, so i am guessing that this is NOT true...

CobraGut 02-23-2011 02:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SeaComms (Post 1065985)
Strange, down here I guess the fuel must swirl in the opposite direction or something! Never heard of anyone having probs with the petrol, Mine has never splashed back either and I fill til the first click off, then go another four or 5 times to click off to drip that last litre or two in.

Now the deisel is another story - most of them cant fill at more than 1/4 speed or it just blows back out and shuts off supply. Not that you guys would have this problem since they dont offer you the deisel version!


do you have the boot cover on the nozzles down there?

dystynkt 02-23-2011 02:30 PM

My wifes Libby has this problem and its very annoying. I don't ever try to top her tank off I just simply put the gas pump in and if I let it run until auto shutoff it shoots a ton of gas back out.

CobraGut 02-23-2011 03:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by NEWWRANGLEROLDCJ7 (Post 1050302)
or is it really a problem??

Nearly 900 Jeep Wrangler owners have filed complaints with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) over the last two years about fuel "spit-back" during fill-ups. Consumers also are reporting the problem in other Chrysler and Dodge models, according to an Edmunds analysis of complaints NHTSA's Office of Defects Investigation (ODI).
According to the complaints, the fuel system does not respond to a shut-off mechanism. Gasoline overflows the tank, sometimes in a spill and sometimes in a spray.
Chrysler has recalled more than 45,000 2005 Dodge Durango models for the problem, and said it had resolved the issue with its fuel-tank supplier. In August 2010, citing 217 complaints, NHTSA opened an inquiry into a similar problem in the 2007 and 2008 Jeep Wrangler. Between January 2009 and January 2011, 891 owners of 2005-2010 Jeep Wranglers filed fuel spit-back complaints with NHTSA. The majority of those reports concerned the 2007 and 2008 model years.
In one complaint filed last month with the federal agency, the owner of a 2005 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited said the vehicle "has an overfilling problem every single time I fill up at the gas station."
"It doesn't matter if I use the lowest setting on the gas pump or if I manually use as little pressure as possible," the owner wrote. "It overfills every single time and gas pours out of the fill spout running down the body of the vehicle on my hand on my clothes and on the ground."
The owner of a 2007 Chrysler Sebring reported that "during refueling, when the fuel nozzle stops, there was an overflow of fuel spaying out of the fuel tank neck. The vehicle was taken to an authorized dealer where they informed that the fuel tank assembly would need to be replaced. The vehicle was in the process of being repaired."
In August 2009, Jeep issued a technical service bulletin for the 2007 and 2008 Wrangler.
It said that consumers were noting that it was hard to fill their vehicles, or that they had to fill them at a very slow rate. The bulletin does not specifically mention fuel spit-back, however. Jeep said it would replace the vent line tube vent line filter, vent line and recirculation line. The problem was that the vent system was not able to provide enough tank ventilation, according to the bulletin.
http://www.autoobserver.com/assets_c...x404-77594.jpgIn October 2010, Chrysler responded to the NHTSA's request for information about the problem. It said it had been made aware of complaints about fuel spills for 191 vehicles (including six in which legal claims had been filed). It noted that "it is possible for fuel spills to occur as a result of users erroneously overfilling a fuel tank by continuing to fill after the automatic shut off mechanism kicks in."
"It is not possible to discern how many of the subject vehicle complaints are a result of user error," Chrysler said. "Such complaints are obviously not a result of a vehicle design issue." And because there was "not a single allegation of crash, fire, property damage or injury" as a result of the spit-backs, there was no safety defect, the automaker said. It told the agency that it should close the investigation.
In its reply, Chrysler said that the only "plausible" explanation for the spit-backs was that the fuel system in the affected cars had been exposed to gasoline with ethanol levels of more than 10 percent -- a higher percentage than the system was designed to handle. In the presence of higher levels of ethanol, components in the inlet check valve (ICV) can swell, causing it to stick and fail to close properly, Chrysler said.
Coincidentally, the Environmental Protection Agency in January waived a limitation on selling gasoline that contains more than 10 percent ethanol for model year 2001 through 2006 passenger vehicles, including cars, SUVs and light pickup trucks. The waiver applies to gasoline that contains up to 15 percent ethanol, known as E15.
Despite Chrysler's call for an end to the investigation for the 2007 and 2008 Jeep Wrangler, it is still open. Complaints of fuel spit-back peaked in January with 211 complaints across Chrysler, Dodge and Jeep brands, according to Edmunds analyst Panee Segal, who studies the NHTSA complaint database. Most of the reports pertain to the Jeep Wrangler.
"There has been a continuous and increasing amount of complaints submitted month to month on this topic and we feel this should be brought to consumers' attention," said Segal, part of the team that does the monthly analysis of complaints that can be found at the Edmunds AutoObserver Data Center.
Federal investigators might be receiving more reports about the issue because some Jeep Wrangler owners are using social media to encourage reporting of the problem. Wrangler spit-back has been discussed in the Edmunds 2008 Jeep Wrangler discussion forum. There is a Facebook page dedicated to the issue. Both that page and a post at JeepForum.com encourage vehicle owners to submit complaints to federal investigators.
http://www.autoobserver.com/assets_c...x528-77596.jpgThe Facebook page's creator, Rod LaFleur, has posted videos of overflows in his 2005 Jeep Wrangler TJ Unlimited on YouTube to document the problem. The videos include a link so owners can file a complaint with the federal agency.
LaFleur, who lives in Chicago and commutes 60 miles a day, said he has filed complaints about the problem with both Chrysler and federal safety investigators. He estimates that he loses 2 to 5 ounces of gasoline every time he fills up. To avoid being splashed, "I make sure I'm far enough away and I make sure no one is standing by it," he said.
He said Chrysler has not offered to replace his fuel tank, and he said that unless there's a design change, Chrysler would only be "replacing one defectively designed part with another defectively designed one."
Chrysler said in its reply to federal investigators that despite its belief that there was no design defect in the Wrangler's inlet check valve, it was going to make changes to it.
Chrysler said it was "working toward a more robust ICV design for production and service that is planned to be implemented in Feb. 2011" to accommodate the swell that apparently occurs in the presence of ethanol levels above 10 percent.
Edmunds analyst Segal, meanwhile, questions why the federal government's previous recall was limited to the 2005 Dodge Durango and why the current investigation only concerns the 2007 and 2008 Jeep Wrangler.
Whether or not other Chrysler-branded vehicles have the same fuel-tank system as the 2007-2008 Jeep Wrangler, Segal said that federal investigators should extend their inquiry to the 2006 to 2009 Dodge Durango, all model years of the Jeep Wrangler and other Chrysler vehicles that have been the subject of consumer complaints of fuel spit-back.
In an e-mail, NHTSA said that its investigation into the issue "is still active."
"In many investigations, NHTSA looks at peer vehicles to see if they experience similar issues," the agency said. "If the agency's assessment indicates similar problems in other vehicles, NHTSA will take action to ensure they are remedied." It said any new information would be posted on its Web site, safercar.gov.
Chrysler spokesman Vince Muniga said that the automaker is "cooperating fully" with NHSTA's investigation. "And until the investigation is closed, we can't get into any details," he said.
Carroll Lachnit: is Edmunds.com Features Editor


this is NOT the automakers fault. his fully explains why the costs of cars are increasing at a rapid pace. They have to spend a lot of money on lawyers and such, when in reality, it is the fault of the gas nozzle itself (see the rubber boot cover post in this thread). No other country requires these boot covers as they are useless and a waste of money. If you read into the complaints, they ALL stem from the USA only, oddly enough, the USA is the only country that requires the vapor boots on the nozzles.

on a side note. I just proved the theory (and got a lot of gas on me in doing so)


below test was completed in Vancouver, BC, two Rubicons (identical in year and design)

Jeep #1 (not mine)
* filled tank. nozzle stopped on its own, no spray
* Gas tank was full

Jeep #2 (mine:(
* placed nozzle so that it was not fully seated (replicating the boot)
* filled tank
* lots of gas, all over the place...nozzle finally stopped

so - get rid of the boot covers, or, push and hold the nozzle in place... super simple and doesn't need to recall vehicles.....

aajakt 02-23-2011 03:23 PM

My 08 spits gas out a d I can tell you it is not because if the rubber boot on the nozzles. I have filled up with both nozzles with and without the boot and it has happen. I have to watch the gas gage and when it gets close to 3/4 I slow down till it us full. And by the way Born and raised in the great USA

bigjerm646 02-23-2011 03:25 PM

uh I dont think that gas nozzle in that video is using that boot. Or what I believe the boot you are talking about.

Geno 02-23-2011 03:30 PM

I have not had any problem with my 98 TJ. But will keep an eye on it.

CobraGut 02-23-2011 03:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bigjerm646 (Post 1076842)
uh I dont think that gas nozzle in that video is using that boot. Or what I believe the boot you are talking about.


yep, it is, clear as day

amenendez_90 02-23-2011 03:42 PM

I have JKU 08 never had a problem,
Maybe a conspiracy to increase gas usage as a means to stimulate the economy……..
later
AMen


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