Jeep Wrangler Forum

Jeep Wrangler Forum (http://www.wranglerforum.com/)
-   General Jeep Discussion (http://www.wranglerforum.com/f19/)
-   -   Mobil Medic Trauma Kits (http://www.wranglerforum.com/f19/mobil-medic-trauma-kits-87260.html)

txoutdoorx4 03-31-2011 09:14 AM

Mobil Medic Trauma Kits
 
Having a proper first-aid kit in case of emergencies while on the trail is crucial when in the backcountry. Mobil Medic Trauma Kits are flat-out the BEST kits on the market for this, and we've reviewed them here:

Mobil Medic Trauma Kits | JPFreek Adventure Magazine - Jeep and Outdoor Adventure Lifestyle Magazine

G-Pur 03-31-2011 09:20 AM

Looks like a great kit. The bp cuff and stethoscope may be a bit much, but it's still a nice kit.

SquadStep 03-31-2011 09:26 AM

Knowing how to use the things included are even more important, IMO. One wrong move and a rescuer could get himself in trouble with lawsuits, etc even in "Good Samaritan" states (very unfortunate). On the other hand, I think it is a great idea because it does allow a person with emergency care knowledge to administer a little more advanced assistance rather than simply applying band-aids and icepacks. :thumb:

SquadStep 03-31-2011 09:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by G-Pur (Post 1149567)
Looks like a great kit. The bp cuff and stethoscope may be a bit much, but it's still a nice kit.

This was my first reaction too, especially with the OPA's and BVM. But after looking into it further there are different levels of the kit you can order with more or less equipment.

jbone 03-31-2011 10:22 AM

I prefer to piece together my own kit but it certainly looks like they've got some really nice well thought out kits. Just as important as having the equipment is the training to use it.

moscoeb 03-31-2011 10:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by G-Pur
Looks like a great kit. The bp cuff and stethoscope may be a bit much, but it's still a nice kit.

What too much about it? Bp cuff to see trends in BP to determine internal blood loss. (yes can be done by other means, but by the time you see those signs, it's way to late!) and stethoscope for lung sounds for poss hemo/pneumo. Again, there are other signs, but many you see without additional equipment are late signs.

I think the best statement is the one about knowing how to use the equipment you have. Don't do more than you are qualified.

Sent from my iPhone using WF Access

sparky 03-31-2011 11:25 AM

That's the point. The average person with first aid training, has no need for those items. They won't know what to do with them.
The Cervical Collar just takes up room, and the Berman Airways should not be in the hands of anybody not trained/certified.
I'd also say, build your own kit to your level of training.

G-Pur 03-31-2011 12:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by moscoeb (Post 1149705)
What too much about it? Bp cuff to see trends in BP to determine internal blood loss. (yes can be done by other means, but by the time you see those signs, it's way to late!) and stethoscope for lung sounds for poss hemo/pneumo. Again, there are other signs, but many you see without additional equipment are late signs.

I think the best statement is the one about knowing how to use the equipment you have. Don't do more than you are qualified.

Sent from my iPhone using WF Access

Also my point. Unless you are trained, on what the hemo/pneumo symptoms are supposed to sound like, you've got no way of knowing if the person just has asthma or something more serious. And for the sphygmomanometer, the needle doesn't just stop, it jumps up and down, so again, unless you know what points to look for, you're just taking a shot in the dark, and wasting time.

183Beast 03-31-2011 10:43 PM

Great kit for an EMT!

TheWalruus 06-11-2012 06:36 PM

Caviat emptor. Really nice guys, but some really lousy follow-through. Mobil Medic has some really nice gear, and the prices are good, but almost six months on I am still waiting for them to send me the rest of the trauma kit that I ordered. It sounds like other people really like them; maybe I just drew the short stick. YMMV.

Edit: I created this account just to post this. Nice site you guys have here, and while I will gladly humor my jeep friends, I am more of a Unimog guy myself.

DFW6ER 06-11-2012 06:46 PM

It'd be a good kit for an ECA or EMT basic...even an ex-military medic/corpsman. Good Samaritan laws cover you to the extent of your training. If your training was 25 years ago and you haven't laid hands on a patient since, realize your limits and don't use the more advanced stuff. It'd be easy to piece together a kit that'd meet the needs of your group, though...possibly cheaper as well.

silver rubi 06-11-2012 07:22 PM

It looks like a great trauma kit for an EMT-Basic. I think I'd carry a few additional items in mine though. (I'm a Paramedic student)

keschete 06-11-2012 07:44 PM

Nice kits, but I agree, there is a lot in there that isn't usable for the regular Joe. If I was taking a kit into the wilderness the main thing I would take is something with a IV set up with some LR and NS. If they are bleeding out or dehydrated, you can feel for a pulse and see if its thready and start the IV. Also some bandages, saline and betadine.

The best thing you can have is training.....wilderness survival, first aid, CPR, the sad thing is that you really can not do anything much out in the wild except stabilize and stop bleeding.

I do agree it is a very good idea to have first aid equipment, but bring someone who is trained to handle emergencies.

silver rubi 06-11-2012 11:48 PM

would you happen to be EMS lol?
I agree!! The best thing you can do is take someone with you who is trained to handle emergencies.

Quote:

Originally Posted by keschete (Post 2462394)
Nice kits, but I agree, there is a lot in there that isn't usable for the regular Joe. If I was taking a kit into the wilderness the main thing I would take is something with a IV set up with some LR and NS. If they are bleeding out or dehydrated, you can feel for a pulse and see if its thready and start the IV. Also some bandages, saline and betadine.

The best thing you can have is training.....wilderness survival, first aid, CPR, the sad thing is that you really can not do anything much out in the wild except stabilize and stop bleeding.

I do agree it is a very good idea to have first aid equipment, but bring someone who is trained to handle emergencies.


keschete 06-12-2012 08:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by silver rubi (Post 2463375)
would you happen to be EMS lol?
I agree!! The best thing you can do is take someone with you who is trained to handle emergencies.

Hehe, I am a NP, but also certified in Emergency Nursing, Trauma, Pediatric Advanced Life Support Instructor and Advanced Cardiac Life Support. I am also a snake and spider person and can identify poisonous critters. :eek:

silver rubi 11-01-2012 07:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by keschete

Hehe, I am a NP, but also certified in Emergency Nursing, Trauma, Pediatric Advanced Life Support Instructor and Advanced Cardiac Life Support. I am also a snake and spider person and can identify poisonous critters. :eek:

Where are you located? I need PALS! :D lol

CombatDiver 11-01-2012 08:34 PM

Get the kit and get the training for all its components (that's how it's done in the medical field) or get training and you'll buy more than you know to use. Having responded to accidents while not in a professionally and better equipped status I can say having some things to use on some already on hand helps. Remember that in the back country people make decisions to go without certain things and I bring what I expect I might need and not much extra. However, in low key outings I find people who are in more dire situations than I expected to be (ie do to extended exposure dehydration and needing an IV/fluids). Granted most cases it's my kit that determines how much I can do but sometimes others have kits with the extra stuff I chose not to bring and that is helpful. So moral of the story is have a kit and as much of a kit you may need.

hosejockey61 11-02-2012 10:40 PM

Did everyone happen to stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night?

"determining internal blood loss"? Seriously? :rolleyes: Let's talk real life here. EVEN if you were to determine that there was internal bleeding....what are you going to do for that? That person needs a SURGEON, not anything else you can provide in the field. Hemo/pneumo? What, are you going to decompress his/her chest with your McDonald's straw? This person ALSO needs a SURGEON. (You could certainly add a 10g decompression needle to your kit but one piece of equipment always leads to another...)

Don't get me wrong, first aid in the field is absolutely beneficial. It is important to control bleeding, maintain breathing, etc....BUT to start adding items to a kit for advanced procedures is kind of pointless. Combat? sure. On the trail? C'mon. Even with proper medical training, there is only so much you can do for a person with major injuries. Stick to basic trauma life support.

The BEST thing you can do for a seriously injured fellow jeeper is to get help, whether that be a satellite phone, CB, cell phone or whatever. If you cannot get a signal or reach anyone on a radio, then you will probably either have to send someone out or transport the person to a location where a signal can be obtained and call in the professionals (ground or air ambulance). Obviously, you would need to know your approximate location or at least give them the name of the trail you are on.

OFF SOAP BOX

BlueRidgeYJ 11-03-2012 08:59 AM

http://www.soloschools.com/
http://www.nols.edu/

Get trained first. Without training you DO NOT know how to respond.

The patient assesment system and SOAP note are the most important things you can do in a wilderness trauma. It is not like a front country trauma. You do not need the typical boo boo kit, you need something more. A bp cuff or stetho is petty useless backcountry unless you are ALS certified. Even so, it doesn't do much good. The NREMT-B Wilderness EMT with ALS cert & WFR instructor I know who does hiking and caving guided trips doesnt carry one of either, and he knows how to use them.

How to determine they are bleeding out? Decrease in BP, and a hole in them. Plug the hole, evac asap. Rigid abdomen, evac asap.
But what to do with fractures? Frostbite or hypothermia? Hyperthermia? Can you identify a brake vs a sprain? Can you clear a spinal injury? Treat a snake bite? Recognize a concusion? What about lightning strikes? Someone passed out in their tent? Know the 7 causes of spinal injury? What about the rest of he group? What should they do? Allergic reactions, epipens, diphenhydramine, and the "death gap"?

Answer those and more, then buy a kit that matches your answers.

Don't act beyond your training; it can easily make a bad day much worse. And the training is what keeps YOUR brain busy during a traumatic situation, which has physcological effects on all parties. Can you help a stranger or friend screaming while his hand is on the ground, or will you scream too? What about a hiking pole stuck through your loved one? Pretty scary thought.

Even getting help requires knowledge. Where they are, what the injury is, what the vitals or stats were until rescuer left, etc. Do you hike with radios? Give one to the TWO people you send out for help, then you can update patient status longer. They can also hand the radio off to EMS or SAR at the trail head, giving them the earliest contact possible. This lets a plan happen before they get onsite.

WFA, CPR, AED certified
HAM operator
Jeep Owner
Grew up playing in the deep woods of GA
Sometimes I feel unprepared.

This is the base of the kit I carry. I have personalized it with other equipment. I think the airway kit is all I took out, though I have no intention of using the torniquet other than as a retention strap or splint strap.
http://www.amazon.com/DixiGear-Respo...rds=trauma+kit

ontheedge 11-03-2012 03:58 PM

Not to what if this, but "what if" the next jeep to come apon an accident had a trained EMT, paramedic, or nurse (bottom line- someone who nows how to use the equipment) would it not be better to have the extra equipment and not need it then to need it and not have it?

As a paramedic with 25 years of service in both inner city and rural we have had incidents were the info feed back to us from the scene to dispatch, to us responding is crucial and important. Having vital signs (bloop pressure, pulse, respirations, and level of consciousness) will determine whether a medivac is coming in or ground and pound units are going to carry out a patient. It doesn't matter if you know how to use the equipment in most cases, 911 centers across the country can assist you by talking you through most any emergency.

sparky 11-04-2012 10:09 AM

Why would someone carry gear that they do not know how to use. It's a waste of money and space. I agree it's important to be prepaired but there is a limit on how much can be carried.

lindel 11-04-2012 03:47 PM

It would be very hard for me to justify some of the things in that kit, just on the off chance that a qualified medical person happens by, especially if I'm out on a trail! Far better to address bleeding you can see, immobilize the victim and treat for shock.

Call for help, or make arrangements for transport out as quickly as possible. If you've got qualified medical help handy, all the better.

BlueRidgeYJ 11-04-2012 04:04 PM

I just noticed the first recomendation on that page is a WFA course. So true.

The breman airways aren't a good idea without training, and like I said a bp cuff and stethoscope don't do much good. Pulse and skin condition will tell you the same, and requires no equipment - if you know how to check. Knowledge is key. Unless you can clear a spinal injury, the cervical collar isn't a bad idea, but if you are prone to be in those situations (kayaking, climbing, etc), you should know how to. Or at least know how to turn a blanket / towel / jacket / sweatshirt / hat into a collar. Carry a sharp straight blade and alchohol or a lighter, no need for a scalpel or surgical knife (though you won't need one anyway).

Education requires less equipment then ignorance is my point. Nobody wants to lug needless equipment around, unless they are nuts.

CombatDiver 11-04-2012 06:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ontheedge
Not to what if this, but "what if" the next jeep to come apon an accident had a trained EMT, paramedic, or nurse (bottom line- someone who nows how to use the equipment) would it not be better to have the extra equipment and not need it then to need it and not have it?

As a paramedic with 25 years of service in both inner city and rural we have had incidents were the info feed back to us from the scene to dispatch, to us responding is crucial and important. Having vital signs (bloop pressure, pulse, respirations, and level of consciousness) will determine whether a medivac is coming in or ground and pound units are going to carry out a patient. It doesn't matter if you know how to use the equipment in most cases, 911 centers across the country can assist you by talking you through most any emergency.

Ditto.

And yes we (both highly trained medical professionals) stayed at the Holiday Inn Express (after camping in a tent about 100 miles south the weekend prior). If you can determine things like internal bleeding then you know whether or not something like life flight is what you should be shooting for or not. I would always recommend having more than you need so those of us who happen upon you on our short hikes while spending the night at the best hotels we can find in the area have more than enough. My medical bag for deer camp was far more robust than it was for Moab last weekend.

BlueRidgeYJ 11-04-2012 07:04 PM

Not to pick nits, but if in the front country, they should make the golden hour or at least have an equipped ems squad within that time. All you need to do is keep air and blood moving until they arrive. In the backcountry, do you really expect a doctor to come along with no medical bag? Without proper training, a big bag of tricks doesn't help. I would not count on running into a w-emt on the trail.

Checking vitals requires no equipment. HR, RR, LOC, Time, Skin temp/color/moisture in the neck or axillara is all you need to determine evac status. Checking palpatory(? - ankle) pulse shows adequate bp to circulate. Pupils show head trauma. SOAPnote/patient assesment is the most important thing you can do - learn it! (obviously not you emts ;) )

A little training goes a LONG way.

And so we are clear, Im not talking about trauma pads or cpr masks - thats very useful. Im talking about bremans, scalpels, bp cuffs, stethoscopes, and other ambulance equipment, itd be great to take one of those collars for immobilized cpr with ya hiking, but it isnt feasable.

free78 11-04-2012 07:38 PM

I was a combat medic in the army. Got out in November of 2005. I recently went back and got my emt basic again after letting everything expire once I got out of the army. In the Army I was able to perform things that paramedics, nurses or doctors would do in the civilian world. Let me tell you guys, getting my basic this time was hard. I had to learn what I couldn't do now that I'm just a civilian. I carry a good bit of stuff in my aid bag. If it is in my bag I have been trained, used it before in combat and am comfortable using it. If you are going to get a bag to carry in your rig, please get some training. You can do more damage than help without the training. Know your skill level and know your equipment. If you ride with a group make sure every one knows where the aid bag is, have a couple people appointed to help if needed before the ride starts, have a couple people appointed for crowd control.

hosejockey61 11-05-2012 10:40 AM

To all of you Holiday Inn Express "doctors" with "years of experience", you know d*mn well that doing CPR in the back country is not going to be successful. Less than .02% of CPR results in a "save" where the person goes on to lead a normal life (usually with deficits)...and that's when pre-hospital care can be there quickly. Imagine having professional help more than an hour out....and you are pumping and blowing. You aren't going to have a good outcome.

Let's say you are a doctor. Let's say you happen to be in the right place at the right time, and you have a medical bag with your stethoscope, BP cuff, airway kits, etc. Let's say you determine that a person has an internal bleed. What will change in the care that you give if you don't have that equipment? My point is, that it doesn't matter whether you use a BP or palp his abdomen...the care will be the same. The only thing you can do for this person is get him to a surgeon.

Don't forget that just because you have a higher training level than the average jeeper doesn't mean you can go off doing advanced procedures. As a paramedic, you still have to work under a sponsoring physicians license aka your medical director or physician advisor. Don't think that the good smaritan law will save your @ss because it won't if you try to do anything other than basic life saving skills.

Yes, a basic first aid kit is a great idea.

Not trying to be an a$$, just trying to be realistic.

BlueRidgeYJ 11-05-2012 10:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hosejockey61
...What will change in the care that you give if you don't have that equipment? My point is, that it doesn't matter whether you use a BP or palp his abdomen...the care will be the same. The only thing you can do for this person is get him to a surgeon.

Don't forget that just because you have a higher training level than the average jeeper doesn't mean you can go off doing advanced procedures. ... Don't think that the good smaritan law will save your @ss because it won't if you try to do anything other than basic life saving skills.

Yes, a basic first aid kit is a great idea.

Not trying to be an a$$, just trying to be realistic.


Exactly.

Exactly. Practicing medicine illegaly is a bad thing.

For certain, but equal to your training.

You are (realistic, that is).

Only thing I would add is lightning cpr (or similar) may be benificial moreso than cardiac arrest from a weak heart but even then it is knowledge, not equipment. Agree completely on all counts, though.

joeuncool 11-05-2012 04:49 PM

However, with the Wilderness First Aid training that this kit recommends, I think this kit is an excellent idea for clubs. A club can put the money together to get a few volunteers trained, buy a few kits, and make sure they have one at least one of the trained people with them when they go out on club sponsored events. We all know that there are a lot of dangers in this "hobby".

As for the average Jeeper? I think it is up to you, but I definitely wouldn't purchase the kit without the training and knowledge how to use everything in it. Of course, in the article, training is the first thing they recommend.

ontheedge 11-07-2012 09:56 PM

Well Hosejock, since you're the resident expert with all the answers, why dont you create a sticky post on the proper administration of first aid and the use of the equipment. I know I could learn a lot from someone like you, that is if you can find the time to get off the couch in the TV room. Just keeping it real.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:33 AM.