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Cons_Table 04-27-2011 11:53 AM

Cooking on Your Weber
 
Hey everyone,

I know I have started a few threads on cooking but not on a weber lol but the wife got me a new weber for our anniversary. I have always been a fan of grilling and learning new ways to do it. I know there are multiple ways to cook on a weber, and I know there are all kinds of charcoal tricks. How do you cook on your weber and what do you do?

Ibuildembig 04-27-2011 11:56 AM

Ohhh yeah....I read the headline and I thought you were asking about carburators lol

Cons_Table 04-27-2011 11:59 AM

Haha theres a cook book for that ;)

http://360digest.com/wp-content/uplo...oldDestiny.jpg

I cook hotdogs under the hood on wheeling trips.

TOKKIE 04-27-2011 12:03 PM

Indirect, cook slow and low.

Cons_Table 04-27-2011 12:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TOKKIE (Post 1205072)
Indirect, cook slow and low.

How do you control the temp? Charcoal is new to me...and I know you cant just turn the flame down like on a gas grill lol

Ibuildembig 04-27-2011 12:12 PM

amount of charcoal and amount of airflow

more air means more heat

Cons_Table 04-27-2011 12:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ibuildembig (Post 1205091)
amount of charcoal and amount of airflow

more air means more heat

This is what I figured...hence the vents on the grill. Thanks.

Ibuildembig 04-27-2011 12:17 PM

No problem....everyone has a certain way of grilling. Anymore I prefer my Teppan-yaki grill in the house lol

dougncrew 04-27-2011 12:28 PM

I like to put all of the charcoal on one side and cook on the other. For tri tip I get the coals nice and hot then take a aluminum foil ball filled with red oak chips and stick that right on the coals. then put the tri tip on as soon as it starts to smoke.
close the lid and dont open for 20 minutes. then flip it over and wait 20 more. when that is done I move it right over the coals turning often untill it is done.

Cons_Table 04-27-2011 12:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dougncrew (Post 1205125)
I like to put all of the charcoal on one side and cook on the other. For tri tip I get the coals nice and hot then take a aluminum foil ball filled with red oak chips and stick that right on the coals. then put the tri tip on as soon as it starts to smoke.
close the lid and dont open for 20 minutes. then flip it over and wait 20 more. when that is done I move it right over the coals turning often untill it is done.

That sounds awesome. :drool:

JL2112 04-27-2011 12:40 PM

Nothing better than an offset smoker IMHO....
Here's last night's tasty treats about 4 hours in...

http://i139.photobucket.com/albums/q...10426-1615.jpg


-J

Pmedg 04-27-2011 12:41 PM

I would recomend getting a Chimney to start your coals, it doesnt have to be this brand, this is just to give you an idea.

Outset Charcoal Chimney Starter, Stainless Steel

Also I prefer using Hardwood Charcoal as I feel it burns better and is more natural than the brickets

Cowboy Charcoal 13020 20lb#

I make grilled pizza on the grill whenever i get the chance, everyone loves it and it only takes a few seconds.

buy a bag of dough and stretch it out on a cookie sheet with some olive oil, cook one side then flip add sauce and whatever else you want to top your pizza (i.e. parm cheese, scallions, mozzarella, slices of steames potatoes, peperoni, etc, etc)

dfry 04-27-2011 04:34 PM

X2 on the chimney. Best way to start charcoal. Also, I have found that not all charcoal is created equal. Kingsford is the only brand I will buy. I also stay away from the Matchlight stuff. Starts easy, but makes food taste like lighter fluid. BTW, with a chimney, you only need newspaper and matches...no lighter fluid. :)

I pretty much cook everything on a Weber. Things that require longer cook times like chicken, turkey , and pork I cook using indirect method. That is to say, put about 25 briquettes on each of two sides (I have charcoal rails to make this easy). Add 8 briquettes per side each hour. Chicken takes 55 minutes. Pork butterfly chops about 30 minutes. Lid stays on throughout.

Hamburgers and steak are cooked using direct method. Steak is my favorite to cook. I prefer a thick cut so it doesn't dry out. I've been experimenting with putting all the briquettes on one side. Searing/blacking steak directly over charcoal then continuing to cook with steak on non-charcoal side and lid on. Saw this on TV, some "famous" chef. Works good, but I still prefer to just cook a thick steak directly over charcoal with lid off. A 1.5-2" ribeye cooked about five minutes each side is perfectly charred and med-rare. The fires got to be hot, though. If it's not HOT enough, it won't seal in the juices properly and ends up over cooked and/or anemic.

Enjoy and experiment. Charcoal cooking on a Weber is the greatest!!

Cons_Table 04-27-2011 04:44 PM

Awesome tips everyone. So what is the purpose of a chimney other than to start your coals outside of the grill?

dfry 04-27-2011 04:54 PM

Actually, I use the chimney inside the grill, just to contain the ashes, etc. I place it on the bottom rack so as not to get crap on the grilling rack. The purpose is to eliminate charcoal lighter which allows the food to taste better. Also makes starting charcoal a breeze. Two full newspaper sheets (4 pages per sheet) in the bottom. Charcoal on top. This concentrates the flame and allows quicker starting and more even burning. Takes about 15 minutes to start.

dfry 04-27-2011 05:02 PM

The chimney also allows you to more easily distribute the briquettes. Just pour them where you want them.

Also forgot to mention when cooking poultry or pork (ribs are great too) I make a drip pan from aluminum foil to place between the charcoal rails to catch the juices. Works well to catch BBQ sauce drippings too.

Brats are another favorite. We boil them for 20 minutes first, then cook indirect to brown. You can do this direct, but they tend to spit their juices at you. :)

Cons_Table 04-27-2011 05:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dfry (Post 1205631)
Actually, I use the chimney inside the grill, just to contain the ashes, etc. I place it on the bottom rack so as not to get crap on the grilling rack. The purpose is to eliminate charcoal lighter which allows the food to taste better. Also makes starting charcoal a breeze. Two full newspaper sheets (4 pages per sheet) in the bottom. Charcoal on top. This concentrates the flame and allows quicker starting and more even burning. Takes about 15 minutes to start.

Awesome...good thing to know. I probably would have just dumped some charcoal in the grill and hit it with some lighter fluid.

On a different note, what kind of ways do you guys use would chips in your cooking? I noticed someone wrapping them in foil and placing them on their coals during indirect cooking. Are there other ways you guys you them? I ask because I have a couple bags of different flavored would chips that I bought to try smoking on my gas grill with a smoker box.

seadog 04-27-2011 05:06 PM

This is my Weber:

http://i1179.photobucket.com/albums/...0427-00022.jpg

I use a chimney to start the charcoal. Good way to get rid of all those phone books. :thumb: And I typically use hardwood charcoal chunks. Unless I am cooking (smoking) something for a long time. Then I use Regular Kingsford charcoal briquettes and water logged wood chunks for smoking. Different types for different flavors. Don't use the fast light charcoal. It gives a weird flavor.

As far as technique, you have to experiment. For steaks, chicken or smaller pork cuts, I lay the charcoal in a 3 inch pile directly opposite of where the lid vent is. All the way up against the wall. And place my upper grill on. Put the lid on and let it sit, with wide open vents, for about 5 minutes. Then take off the lid and clean the grill from the last use.

With the lid off, I place the meat directly over the coals and give each side a 2 minute sear. Then I move the meat under the vent and start a 6 minute rotation, with the lid on. I adjust the upper vent to control heat (unless smoking. Then I adjust both). This is where experimentation comes in. What ever is directly below the vent has higher heat, so you have to rotate it to the sides.

You name it, and I've probably cooked it on my Webers. This is my 4th in 30 years. I wear them out.

And if I'm cooking something like lots of ribs, I have an offset cast iron smoker. Just for the space. I also have 3 turkey fryers and a large LP gas grill, but I haven't used it in years. When it comes to cooking meat, that's my job. The missus does the sides.

Just play with it. You'll burn a few. And under cook others. That's why we have take out. :rofl2:

EdJonesJeeper 04-27-2011 05:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pmedg (Post 1205156)
I would recomend getting a Chimney to start your coals, it doesnt have to be this brand, this is just to give you an idea.

Outset Charcoal Chimney Starter, Stainless Steel

Also I prefer using Hardwood Charcoal as I feel it burns better and is more natural than the brickets

Cowboy Charcoal 13020 20lb#

I make grilled pizza on the grill whenever i get the chance, everyone loves it and it only takes a few seconds.

buy a bag of dough and stretch it out on a cookie sheet with some olive oil, cook one side then flip add sauce and whatever else you want to top your pizza (i.e. parm cheese, scallions, mozzarella, slices of steames potatoes, peperoni, etc, etc)

The charcoal chimney is a must but don't buy a crappy one they rust after about 2 seasons.

This one is the best I've found and its stainless and the side air vents start it faster.

Weber Grills and Accessories


Absolutly righton about the hardwood. At your local ace you can usually get a hugh bag 20lbs for about $15

Cons_Table 04-27-2011 05:16 PM

Great info! I am excited to try it out...good thing the weekend is almost here

chucky cheese 04-27-2011 07:14 PM

Love to grill. Back in the 70's we use to go to the K and B drugstore and buy a hibachi grill. A single was 7.00 and a double was 9.00 dollars. Go out to lakefront and Q all day. The hibachi was so cheap we use to leave it there if we drank too much and it was still hot. A weber grill is great as is the info on this thread.

Cons_Table 04-27-2011 11:39 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Check out what I found in the cupboard. I forgot my grandparents found this for me at a garage sale a long time ago. It explains all of basic stuff of grilling on a charcoal grill or a gas grill along with providing a bunch of recipes. :punk:

Pmedg 04-28-2011 07:37 AM

I am a big fan of grilled vegitables as well. nothing is better than some grilled asparagus, onions, beets (littel olive oil salt and pepper and throw on the grill) to go with your steaks.

Pmedg 04-28-2011 07:49 AM

Here are a few pictures of some of my summer set up, and some of my favorite things to grill.

First is the Small, Medium, & Large Charcoal grills at the summerhouse. I hate wasting a ton of charcoal to get the big grill going if I’m cooking for 1 or two.

Second is Grilled Lobsters. While they are still alive I cut them down the middle but not all the way through the shell. Then I pour in butter that was melted with some lemon juice in it and they taste delicious.

Third is our Thanksgiving turkey. I use indirect heat to cook it to give it a smoked flavor. I use a tin foil tray that I fill with water and put the coals around it with smoking chips that i soaked overnight to add to the flavor. It takes a lot less time that cooking it in an oven, and it is a lot more moist. My mother and father used to have a turkey competition where she would bake hers and he would smoke his. After a few years we decided no to bother baking one and instead just smoke one big one.

Last is some Steaks, Asparagus, Portabella Mushrooms, and Beets that I made for lunch a few weeks ago.

jgano23 04-28-2011 07:51 AM

is it a bad thing when you read this thread title and your mind immediately thinks carburetors instead of grills?

Gate53 04-28-2011 07:55 AM

Any fruit tree chips will give the meat a good taste (my favorite is Persimmon) apple, cherry, I never tried citrus. Just take the chips and let them soak for a few hours and part way through just sprinkle the chips on the coals and let them smoke into the meat.

Pmedg 04-28-2011 08:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gate53 (Post 1206985)
Any fruit tree chips will give the meat a good taste (my favorite is Persimmon) apple, cherry, I never tried citrus. Just take the chips and let them soak for a few hours and part way through just sprinkle the chips on the coals and let them smoke into the meat.


I'll have to try that, i usually use hickory. i bet the citrus would be really good with a pork tenderloin

harwa004 04-28-2011 08:11 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jgano23 (Post 1206982)
is it a bad thing when you read this thread title and your mind immediately thinks carburetors instead of grills?

:rofl::rofl::rofl: You SO ROCK, Jess! :thumb:

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pmedg (Post 1205156)
I would recomend getting a Chimney to start your coals, it doesnt have to be this brand, this is just to give you an idea.

Outset Charcoal Chimney Starter, Stainless Steel

Cheap, homemade chimney can be made from an empty tobacco can...my dad did that when I was young. I don't have a pic of what he did, but used a can like below, but a coffee can could be used, as well.
http://i905.photobucket.com/albums/a...pe-tobacco.jpg


Found an instructable on it for concepts:

http://www.instructables.com/id/How-...rcoal-Chimney/

Cons_Table 04-28-2011 09:17 AM

Where do you guys get your wood chips? A lot of places I look at just sell hickory or mesquite chips?

Pmedg 04-28-2011 09:21 AM

you can get them at whole foods, amazon.com, or at a store that sells charcoal grills.


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