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Old 02-09-2011, 07:03 PM
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Steering pump after lift and tires.

I have an 06 LJ with a 4" suspension lift and I'm runnin 33" tires on 15x10 wheels. Recently I've been havin problems with the steering on my rig, whether it's loosening or just not set right, I could use some opinions.
So as I drive down the road the steering wheel tends to 'act loose' or it has lots of play in it when driving down the road at high speeds. Any ideas?

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Old 02-09-2011, 07:09 PM   #2
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Did you install SYE and extended rear DS and steering stabilizer? did you extend rear track bars? what all did you do? did you get a balance and alignment? with 4 inches and above you usually cant just slap a lift on. Sounds like a bit of death wobble to me, check out the sticky thread.

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Old 02-09-2011, 08:17 PM
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No sye needed cause I have an LJ which is a 2 door TJ unlimited. Longer wheelbase helps. I've had the lift for a long time now and it's all mechanically sound, no death wobble or anything like that. Front and rear control arms all replaced, greasable bushings are maintained monthly, etc....
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Old 02-09-2011, 09:13 PM   #4
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Have you upgraded your steering components? Also have you had an alignment?
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Old 02-09-2011, 09:22 PM   #5
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My first check would be insuring the toe-in is set properly. The toe-in must always be adjusted after the suspension lift height changes and a bad toe-in will cause the steering to be unstable. A suspension lift will cause excessive toe-in which not only causes unstable steering, it also causes dramatically accelerated front tire wear.
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Old 02-10-2011, 12:29 AM
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I had an alignment about a month ago, proper toe-in and tires get rotated about 5000 miles. What I'm experiencing is some loose feeling in the steering wheel when I drive down the road. At about 60 mph I am constantly adjusting the steering wheel within a couple of degrees, roughly 35 degrees, of rotation to just go straight and stay on the road. I don't know if there is some adjustment I can make to tighten the steering or what...
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Old 02-10-2011, 04:09 AM   #7
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Did you try tightening the steering gearbox? You can take as much slop out of your steering as you want. All you need is an Allen and a combo wrench the adjustment is located on top at the base of your gearbox. Loosen the nut dial in the Allen screw. ( what you doing is closing the gap between the gears in the box I.E. removing or anding slop) wiggle your steering wheel to comfortable slop and retighten the don't let the allen screw move while you tighten the nut though. Remember a 1/16" of a turn makes a big difference.
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Old 02-10-2011, 09:25 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by N3V3RG0NNA5T0P View Post
Did you try tightening the steering gearbox? You can take as much slop out of your steering as you want. All you need is an Allen and a combo wrench the adjustment is located on top at the base of your gearbox. Loosen the nut dial in the Allen screw. ( what you doing is closing the gap between the gears in the box I.E. removing or anding slop) wiggle your steering wheel to comfortable slop and retighten the don't let the allen screw move while you tighten the nut though. Remember a 1/16" of a turn makes a big difference.
He has an '06 with the Mercedes steering box and it isn't as easily adjusted as you are suggesting. Screwing up that adjustment means his steering box would be toast in short order.

Besides, his steering problem happened after he installed his lift so the problem lies with something done at that time. The problem is most likely only that his toe-in is now excessive as explained above. A bad toe-in setting is the usual cause of "sloppy" steering with a bad caster angle being another but slightly less likely source.

The below is out of the FSM which covers the newer Mercedes steering box.

"ADJUSTMENTS
CAUTION: Steering gear must be adjusted in the
proper order. If adjustments are not performed in
order, gear damage and improper steering response
may result.
NOTE: Adjusting the steering gear in the vehicle is
not recommended. Remove gear from the vehicle
and drain the fluid. Then mount gear in a vise to
perform adjustments.
WORM THRUST BEARING PRELOAD
NOTE: Off center torque (180 to 360 degrees from
gear center) = 0.4 to 0.8 Nm (3.5 in-lb to 7.0 in-lb)
This torque is set in the assembly plant and can’t
be adjusted in the field
OVER-CENTER ROTATING TORQUE
(1) Mount the gear carefully into a vise.
CAUTION: Do not overtighten the vise on the gear
case. This may affect the adjustment
(2) Rotate the input shaft with a crows foot socket
from stop to stop and count the number of turns.
(3) Starting at either stop, turn the input shaft
back 1/2 the total number of turns. This is the center
of the gear travel.
(4) Loosen the adjuster plug locknut.
(5) Place the torque wrench in the vertical position
on the input shaft. Rotate the wrench 50 degrees
each side of the center and record the highest rotational
torque in this range (Fig. 6). This is the Over-
Center Rotating Torque.
NOTE: The input shaft must rotate smoothly without
sticking or binding.
(6) The Over-Center Rotating Torque should be
0.53-0.93 Nm (4.5 - 8 in. lbs.) higher in addition to
the off center torque from above (Fig. 6). than the
Preload Rotating Torque.
(7) If an adjustment to the Over-Center Rotating
Torque is necessary, first loosen the adjuster lock
nut. Then turn the pitman shaft adjuster screw back
(COUNTERCLOCKWISE) increases torque,
(CLOCKWISE) reduces torque (Fig. 7).
(8) Remeasure Over-Center Rotating Torque. If
necessary turn the adjuster screw and repeat measurement
until correct Over-Center Rotating Torque
is reached (Fig. 7).
NOTE: To increase the Over-Center Rotating Torque
turn the screw COUNTERCLOCKWISE.
(9) Prevent the adjuster screw from turning while
tightening adjuster lock nut (Fig. 7). Tighten the
adjuster lock nut to 65 Nm (48 ft. lbs.)."

Without the illustrations the above isn't much good but it should serve to indicate that it's not a simple adjustment to make.
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Old 02-10-2011, 01:17 PM   #9
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Wow thats nuts! Is that stock in all LJ? So he wouldn't be able to just slap an AGR steering box in there either? I thought 06' was the first year of the JK
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Old 02-10-2011, 04:10 PM   #10
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Jerry for his sake and for my future-use knowledge, explain how to set/fix proper toe in please
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Old 02-10-2011, 08:54 PM
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Wow that is a crazy instruction. Thanks for it but would u happen to have a link to where I can look that up with images?
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Old 02-10-2011, 08:58 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by N3V3RG0NNA5T0P View Post
Wow thats nuts! Is that stock in all LJ? So he wouldn't be able to just slap an AGR steering box in there either? I thought 06' was the first year of the JK
Nope, the TJ/LJ steering box changed to the Mercedes style around 2003. Its mounting bolt pattern is different so you can't bolt up an earlier steering box, AGR, Tommy Lee, etc. without cutting out one of the mounting bolt inserts and welding it back in to match the old bolt pattern.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenSahara00 View Post
Jerry for his sake and for my future-use knowledge, explain how to set/fix proper toe in please
The basic toe-in and steering wheel centering information is at Basic Jeep Front End Alignment

Basically speaking, you use a tape measure to measure between the tires so you can adjust the tie rod's length to get the front of the tires 1/16" to 1/8" closer together in front than in the rear... so they are "toe'd in".

Measuring between the tires to achieve the correct amount of toe-in as described in the above link. However, removing the tires and measuring the distance between the two 1" square aluminum tubes instead of your tires, like below, marked at points equal to your tire diameter, will give you a more accurate and repeatable measurement. It's also a little easier to make the measurement between the two aluminum tubes than between the tires.
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