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Old 03-21-2016, 04:40 PM
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Will Stock JK Shocks and Springs fit on a TJ

Howdy All,
I need to replace the springs on my 2006 TJ and rear shocks. I found a seller that has just pulled his factory suspension from a 2012 Jeep Wrangler unlimited Rubicon.
Does anyone know if these would fit on my TJ?
Thanks

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Old 03-21-2016, 04:50 PM   #2
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Not without work. Search the forum and you will find many detailed discussions about installing JK coils and shocks on a TJ.

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Old 03-21-2016, 05:00 PM
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Thanks JJVW
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Old 03-21-2016, 08:25 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by Danadog View Post
Howdy All,
I need to replace the springs on my 2006 TJ and rear shocks. I found a seller that has just pulled his factory suspension from a 2012 Jeep Wrangler unlimited Rubicon.
Does anyone know if these would fit on my TJ?
Thanks
This question comes up at least twice a week I think. Searching will give you plenty of information. The short answer is: not worth the effort.
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Old 03-22-2016, 02:52 AM   #5
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I just did this recently, now that ive done it, it wasnt so bad, with a spacer in front i did get 3" of lift, and it does ride smoother. however, I also replaced/tuned up all the steering components and still working on a few.

The people who say "not worth it" probably have $1000 bills flying out of their exhaust hole. To me, new shocks and a 3" lift for a little work was worth it.

if you want my advice, I would do it but get 3" lift coil springs for the front if you can find some cheap, and a 1" transfer case drop or 1" motor mount lift.

if you want some advice removing the bar pins: its all about heat. Heat the pin and it slides out. Even it slides a little just use some wd40 and work it around. dont use a hammer. to install the bar pins on the new shocks, if there is a round metal spacer bar where your bar pin should go, here is the tip of the century that would have saved me a ton of time had i known it right away:

take your propane torch and put it right up to the hole and heat it from the inside. Try not to melt too much rubber. pop it out and put the bar pin in.

Also, the rear coil springs, I lacked the tools to heat it up to bend it. So I cut a little bit off the end, just enough so it would fit over the cup. In fact, I had to cut one spring twice, then grind it down a little to get it perfect. then i knew exactly how much to cut the other one.
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Old 03-22-2016, 07:27 AM   #6
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The people who say "not worth it" probably have $1000 bills flying out of their exhaust hole.
ha! I wish. I just think if you need a spacer to gain a lift with your lift springs, you're doing something wrong. I'm on a budget just like everyone else, thats why I do a lot of research before spending my money, I want to make damn sure I spend it well.

The majority of the reports on JK front springs I've seen said they lost height compared to the TJ springs they removed - hence they needed big spacers to get any lift. Also, having worked on a JK and seeing the springs...I think they're lighter rate and shorter than many good TJ lift options. The JK front shocks aren't a bad match for a Budget Boost, depending on how you deal with the bar pins and how much bumpstop extension end up needing (you'll need at least 0.5"-1"). The JK rear shocks are definitely not worth the effort - they lack travel but still require 2.5" bumpstop extension (aka you actually lose travel compared to a good aftermarket TJ shock).

there are better budget TJ lift options out there - ZJ V8 springs and Crown Vic springs for example. Spend your money on good shocks like OME or Bilstein.
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Old 03-22-2016, 08:56 PM   #7
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Yes, the front is problematic, I did use a 1.75" spacer in front. Thats why I suggested 3" lift front coil springs, if I did it again I think I would buy them instead of the spacer. The front shock does seem a bit weak, maybe I will put a gopro down there and see what happens when i drive over some speed bumps. But this was a new to me Jeep and the peace of mind I got just by putting in these parts, at that price, was worth it to me. I had to buy all new bumpstops anyway, the old ones were rotten. If someday, I just have $800-900 lying around, I might get a better lift kit. Or more likely I would buy a 4.0 engine and put that in and hopefully have a couple hundred left over, which I then would definitely need for new coil springs on the front
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Old 03-22-2016, 09:26 PM   #8
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I had to buy all new bumpstops anyway, the old ones were rotten.
this statement is confusing, and not helpful to anyone trying to understand the dynamics at play here.

bumpstops consist of 4 main parts -
1. bumpstop tower (part of the frame)
2. bumpstop pad (part of the axle)
3. bumpstop cup (bolted to tower)
4. jounce bumper (pressed into cup)

If you install a lift, you will very likely need bumpstop extensions as well. This decreases the distance between the cup and the pad to prevent damage to parts.

The jounce bumper will completely compress into the cup when driving the vehicle, and it's designed to do that. If you're replacing the jounce bumper you want to use OEM replacement stuff - it's a specifically designed microcellular polyurethane. You do NOT want to replace this with a hard polyurethane jounce or longer jounce that is often sold in the aftermarket.

Now, you said you had to buy new bumpstops. What EXACTLY does that mean? How did you know what to buy? How did you determine how much bumpstop extension was required to prevent part damage?
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Old 03-22-2016, 09:36 PM   #9
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My only comment is that you get what you pay for. I don't have or really want a huge lift, but I do want as much wheel travel as I can reasonably get. I don't see that happening with spacers on the front and short shocks on the rear.
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Old 03-23-2016, 10:20 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by UnlimitedLJ04 View Post
this statement is confusing, and not helpful to anyone trying to understand the dynamics at play here.

bumpstops consist of 4 main parts -
1. bumpstop tower (part of the frame)
2. bumpstop pad (part of the axle)
3. bumpstop cup (bolted to tower)
4. jounce bumper (pressed into cup)

If you install a lift, you will very likely need bumpstop extensions as well. This decreases the distance between the cup and the pad to prevent damage to parts.

The jounce bumper will completely compress into the cup when driving the vehicle, and it's designed to do that. If you're replacing the jounce bumper you want to use OEM replacement stuff - it's a specifically designed microcellular polyurethane. You do NOT want to replace this with a hard polyurethane jounce or longer jounce that is often sold in the aftermarket.

Now, you said you had to buy new bumpstops. What EXACTLY does that mean? How did you know what to buy? How did you determine how much bumpstop extension was required to prevent part damage?
I got a ruler and measured the difference.

I just did an eBay search for "jounce bumper tj wrangler" and got 28 results. I searched "bumpstop tj wrangler" and got over 300 results. Apparently, Im not the only one reerring to them as bumpstops.

The old bumpstops that were in there, with their specifically designed molecular structure, were crumbling into dust. If my bumpstop cup was rotten, I would have said I replaced my bumpstop cup.

Can everyone stop acting smarmy now? Please and thank you.

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