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Old 12-08-2018, 10:58 AM
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285/70r17 Nitto RG Question

In the above size tire, Nitto lists a 116q that weighs 49lb and cost less. The same tire is also listed as a 116/113q and a 121q both of which weigh 57lbs and cost about. 50.00 more. What is the difference?

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Old 12-08-2018, 07:57 PM   #2
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Load range. SL/C/E, respectively.

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Old 12-16-2018, 05:56 PM
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Ok, for my use, daily driver about 68 miles a day all interstate and light off roading during hunting season will the 49lb 116q tire be ok or do I need to use one of the heavier 54lb tires? Does it matter?
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Old 12-16-2018, 06:05 PM   #4
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The C and E truck tires will ride stiffer but also have stronger sidewalls if you plan on rocky trails.
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Old 12-16-2018, 06:08 PM
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No Rocky trails in LA(lower Alabama). So the 116q is ok for fire roads and daily driving then?

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Old 01-06-2019, 08:41 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OLIE J View Post
Load range. SL/C/E, respectively.
What is SL?
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Old 01-08-2019, 01:55 PM   #7
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To @SLO :

SL = "Standard Load"

To @ChemE :

An LT (light truck) tire with a "C" load rating will be a better choice for your jeep than a passenger car tire with an SL rating that won't stand up to offroad use or the heavier "E" load rated tire which will be too stiff.

In my opinion your better choice would be the Nitto Ridge Grappler LT285/70R17-C, stock number 217010, with the 116/113Q combined speed and load rating, linked here: https://www.nittotire.com/light-truc...ht-truck-tire/
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Old 01-09-2019, 07:37 AM   #8
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I'd go with a "P" rated tire over the "LT-C" rated tire whenever it's an option.

Reasons:

More load carrying capacity
Higher mileage warranty
More silica in the rubber compound for rain/snow traction
Better fuel economy
Almost no difference in sidewall strength whatsoever
Less expensive to purchase
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Old 01-09-2019, 07:44 AM   #9
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Stronger sidewalls and more plies in the tread area both help if your fire roads have a lot of branches sticking up, etc. You might call Nitto for their opinion.
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Old 01-09-2019, 10:59 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by WXman View Post
I'd go with a "P" rated tire over the "LT-C" rated tire whenever it's an option. . .

Reasons:

More load carrying capacity
Higher mileage warranty
More silica in the rubber compound for rain/snow traction
Better fuel economy
Almost no difference in sidewall strength whatsoever
Less expensive to purchase
I think you need to check your facts.

P rated tires typically do not last as long offroad as LT tires.

LT tires have nearly the same load carrying capability per psi as P rated tires.
What gives LT tires the added load carrying capacity is the ability to inflate them to higher pressures than P rated tires.

The tread in P rated tires is typically softer than in LT tires and will chunk more easily from contact with rocks and gravel.

The abrasive nature of the rocks and gravel in offroad situations will reduce total tire mileage. Besides, most manufacturers exclude offroad use from their mileage warranties anyway so the 60,000 mile passenger car tire highway mileage warranty that seemed so appealing at the tire store will most likely be unavailing for jeepers who use their jeeps offroad.

There is more to sidewall strength than the number of plies. LT tires have stronger tire carcasses and the sidewall plies typically use thicker denier thread than P rated tires and have a higher thread count.

Fuel mileage differences are so small as to be impossible to measure accurately. Besides, its a jeep. If you purchased it with any concerns about fuel mileage you purchased the wrong vehicle.

But you are correct that P rated tires generally behave better than LT tires on rain slicked highways and they are typically less expensive.

I am reminded of one of Judge Milian's favorite sayings on The People's Court:

Quote:
"We have a saying in Spanish, 'Lo barato sale caro'. The cheap comes out expensive."
You can use whatever tires you want on your jeep; you won't find P rated tires on any of mine.
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Old 01-09-2019, 08:58 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by Mr. Bills View Post
I think you need to check your facts.

P rated tires typically do not last as long offroad as LT tires.

LT tires have nearly the same load carrying capability per psi as P rated tires.
What gives LT tires the added load carrying capacity is the ability to inflate them to higher pressures than P rated tires.

The tread in P rated tires is typically softer than in LT tires and will chunk more easily from contact with rocks and gravel.

The abrasive nature of the rocks and gravel in offroad situations will reduce total tire mileage. Besides, most manufacturers exclude offroad use from their mileage warranties anyway so the 60,000 mile passenger car tire highway mileage warranty that seemed so appealing at the tire store will most likely be unavailing for jeepers who use their jeeps offroad.

There is more to sidewall strength than the number of plies. LT tires have stronger tire carcasses and the sidewall plies typically use thicker denier thread than P rated tires and have a higher thread count.

Fuel mileage differences are so small as to be impossible to measure accurately. Besides, its a jeep. If you purchased it with any concerns about fuel mileage you purchased the wrong vehicle.

But you are correct that P rated tires generally behave better than LT tires on rain slicked highways and they are typically less expensive.

I am reminded of one of Judge Milian's favorite sayings on The People's Court:



You can use whatever tires you want on your jeep; you won't find P rated tires on any of mine.
In addition, the the same tread pattern on a P metric tends to be smaller and blocked closer together than that of an LT, the tread depth is almost alway less, and the corners are more rounded.
P's are better for street than trail and as a result generally look less aggressive.
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Old 01-10-2019, 11:52 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Bills View Post
I think you need to check your facts.

P rated tires typically do not last as long offroad as LT tires.

LT tires have nearly the same load carrying capability per psi as P rated tires.
What gives LT tires the added load carrying capacity is the ability to inflate them to higher pressures than P rated tires.

The tread in P rated tires is typically softer than in LT tires and will chunk more easily from contact with rocks and gravel.

The abrasive nature of the rocks and gravel in offroad situations will reduce total tire mileage. Besides, most manufacturers exclude offroad use from their mileage warranties anyway so the 60,000 mile passenger car tire highway mileage warranty that seemed so appealing at the tire store will most likely be unavailing for jeepers who use their jeeps offroad.

There is more to sidewall strength than the number of plies. LT tires have stronger tire carcasses and the sidewall plies typically use thicker denier thread than P rated tires and have a higher thread count.

Fuel mileage differences are so small as to be impossible to measure accurately. Besides, its a jeep. If you purchased it with any concerns about fuel mileage you purchased the wrong vehicle.

But you are correct that P rated tires generally behave better than LT tires on rain slicked highways and they are typically less expensive.

I am reminded of one of Judge Milian's favorite sayings on The People's Court:



You can use whatever tires you want on your jeep; you won't find P rated tires on any of mine.

OK.

P rated tires typically do not last as long offroad as LT tires.

He specifically said this is primarily a daily driver with occasional fire roads. So this argument isn't valid.


LT tires have nearly the same load carrying capability per psi as P rated tires.
What gives LT tires the added load carrying capacity is the ability to inflate them to higher pressures than P rated tires.

Who cares? Nobody runs 80 PSI in a Jeep tire. And tit for tat, the P-metric sizes almost always have higher load ratings.



The tread in P rated tires is typically softer than in LT tires and will chunk more easily from contact with rocks and gravel.

Which is why they have better traction on the road, particularly in rain, and again, he already said this is a DD with light trail use. P rated tires aren't going to fall apart on gravel roads either. They are formulated specifically to handle that usage in most cases and the manufacturers say so right on their websites.




The abrasive nature of the rocks and gravel in offroad situations will reduce total tire mileage. Besides, most manufacturers exclude offroad use from their mileage warranties anyway so the 60,000 mile passenger car tire highway mileage warranty that seemed so appealing at the tire store will most likely be unavailing for jeepers who use their jeeps offroad.

In 24 years I've never heard of a tire shop denying warranty unless the customer shows proof of how many miles were off road and how many were on road. That just isn't realistic.



There is more to sidewall strength than the number of plies. LT tires have stronger tire carcasses and the sidewall plies typically use thicker denier thread than P rated tires and have a higher thread count.

There are P rated tires on the market (such as Falken's A/T) that have thicker and more robust construction than LT tires from other brands. One can't make a blanket statement that LT tires are stronger. Tires vary by brand, size, etc. in their construction. In 24 years, I've had two flats and the only one that happened offroad was a LT rated tire. I've never had a P tire fail and that's on trails with rock ledges, mud pits, stumps, gravel, sand, and a few other things.



Fuel mileage differences are so small as to be impossible to measure accurately. Besides, its a jeep. If you purchased it with any concerns about fuel mileage you purchased the wrong vehicle.

There's an old saying "a fool and his money will soon split". The fact that LT tires are heavier and have deeper tread (more friction) and those things burn more fuel and cost more money everytime you turn the key can't be debated. And since the OP clearly said this is his DD, I would think that money matters to him.

But you are correct that P rated tires generally behave better than LT tires on rain slicked highways and they are typically less expensive.

I am reminded of one of Judge Milian's favorite sayings on The People's Court:



You can use whatever tires you want on your jeep; you won't find P rated tires on any of mine.


I'm glad I've never heard of Milian.
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Old 01-10-2019, 12:03 PM   #13
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Whatever, dude.

As I said before - you can use whatever tires you want on your jeep but you won't find "P" rated tires on any of mine - daily driver or otherwise.

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