Jl 3.6 vs jk 3.6 - Jeep Wrangler Forum
Jeep Wrangler Forum

Go Back   Jeep Wrangler Forum > JK Jeep Wrangler Forum > JK General Discussion Forum

Join Wrangler Forum Today


Like Tree25Likes
Reply
 
Thread Tools

Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about them on WranglerForum.com
Old 07-11-2019, 08:32 PM
Thread Starter
  #1
Jeeper
 
Dutchman01's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2017
Posts: 214
Jl 3.6 vs jk 3.6

Iím given to understand there are some differences between the 3.6 engines between the jl and jkís.

Does anyone know about some of these differences? How about a good source for information? I canít seem to find any information out there.

Dutchman01 is offline   Quote
Old 07-11-2019, 08:57 PM   #2
Jeeper
 
gobi_rubi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Posts: 194

gobi_rubi is online now   Quote
Old 07-11-2019, 08:59 PM   #3
Jeeper
 
Flyfisher590's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 1,202
The biggest one I've heard of, maybe the only one, is the stop/start thing with the engine... where it stops the engine when you stop, and automatically restarts when you put your foot on the gas.

I wouldn't like it, but you can turn that feature off with a button on the dash. The problem is that you can't permanently turn it off on a menu somewhere. You have to push the disable button every time you start it up... assuming you don't like it, that is.

I don't own a JL. That's just regurgitated from what I've read.

As far as I know, that's the only significant change. Same basic engine.
Flyfisher590 is offline   Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 07-11-2019, 09:02 PM   #4
Jeeper
 
Lemotan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2019
Location: California
Posts: 357
invariant likes this.
Lemotan is offline   Quote
Old 07-11-2019, 09:02 PM
Thread Starter
  #5
Jeeper
 
Dutchman01's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2017
Posts: 214
Quote:
Originally Posted by gobi_rubi View Post
Thanks but that doesnít tell me the differences, if any, between those engines for the jk as opposed to the jlís.
Dutchman01 is offline   Quote
Old 07-11-2019, 09:21 PM
Thread Starter
  #6
Jeeper
 
Dutchman01's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2017
Posts: 214
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lemotan View Post
Crap. According to those articles the aussies had a 3.6 in their 2010 jkís!

My 2010 jk had that 3.8! Crap again.

Well, temper tantrum over that still doesnít indicate any differences between the engines in the jk and jl. Of course there may not be any. Iíve just run across a couple of references to such.

Iíll just keep looking.

Very good article btw.
Dutchman01 is offline   Quote
Old 07-11-2019, 09:30 PM   #7
Jeeper
 
Lemotan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2019
Location: California
Posts: 357
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dutchman01 View Post
Crap. According to those articles the aussies had a 3.6 in their 2010 jkís!

My 2010 jk had that 3.8! Crap again.

Well, temper tantrum over that still doesnít indicate any differences between the engines in the jk and jl. Of course there may not be any. Iíve just run across a couple of references to such.

Iíll just keep looking.

Very good article btw.
Its in the article, a lot of differences:
Cooled EGR valve
New valve train
New PCV
Smaller oil sump
Higher compression
ESS
JL Pentastar is a more complicated version with the same power output.
WillB and Wrangleur like this.
Lemotan is offline   Quote
Old 07-11-2019, 09:38 PM
Thread Starter
  #8
Jeeper
 
Dutchman01's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2017
Posts: 214
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lemotan View Post
Its in the article, a lot of differences:
Cooled EGR valve
New valve train
New PCV
Smaller oil sump
Higher compression
ESS
JL Pentastar is a more complicated version with the same power output.
Those articles (I followed the links) showed the differences between the 2010 3.6 and the 2016 3.6. Iím grateful. I didnít even know about the 2010 model, thatís whatís in my 2015.

However it doesnít tell me the differences between the 2016 3.6 and the version in the jl.

Again. Thanks. At least I know more than I did.
Dutchman01 is offline   Quote
Old 07-11-2019, 09:48 PM   #9
THE MIGHTY GRIZZLY!

5-Year WF Supporting Member
::WF Moderator::
 
Old Dogger's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: AZ. In the Ponderosa Pine Country, where the Bears are hungry..
Posts: 24,354
The engine oil capacity is 1 qt less in the JL 3.6. The coolant capacity is also somewhat less. As for the rest, I'm not sure..
__________________
1974 CJ5, 2003 TJ, 2013 2 door Black Rubicon, auto, with 4.10 ratio.
Shaking at 40-70 MPH, Read this!!!

The Mighty Grizzly is not concerned,
with
the needs of the Hunter....


Click here and become a WF supporting Member
Old Dogger is offline   Quote
Old 07-11-2019, 10:23 PM   #10
Jeeper
 
Lemotan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2019
Location: California
Posts: 357
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dutchman01 View Post
Those articles (I followed the links) showed the differences between the 2010 3.6 and the 2016 3.6. I’m grateful. I didn’t even know about the 2010 model, that’s what’s in my 2015.

However it doesn’t tell me the differences between the 2016 3.6 and the version in the jl.

Again. Thanks. At least I know more than I did.
There are only two versions of Pentastar in this specific article "2010" is JK version and "2016" is JL version.
Since its Australian market it could be that they go by calendar year and not by "model tear" like in US, anyway its the same engine.
Lemotan is offline   Quote
Old 07-11-2019, 10:37 PM   #11
Jeeper
 
gobi_rubi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Posts: 194
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dutchman01 View Post
Thanks but that doesnít tell me the differences, if any, between those engines for the jk as opposed to the jlís.
It does under the "Pentastar Upgrade" section. The engine was updated in 16 but the updated version didn't make its way into Wranglers until the JLs were released.

For 2016, FCA released an updated version of the 3.6 L engine for the Jeep Grand Cherokee and Dodge Durango. This engine now featured two-stage variable valve lift (VVL), a cooled EGR, a new intake manifold, new fuel injectors, and new ignition coils. It also features upgrades to the variable valve timing (VVT) system, an increased compression ratio (11.3:1), lower internal friction and lower weight. These improvements help to increase power as well as efficiency.[10] The new version, however, has lost its flex-fuel capability.
FLEX B, Wrangleur and mcguirev10 like this.
gobi_rubi is online now   Quote
Old 07-12-2019, 07:58 AM
Thread Starter
  #12
Jeeper
 
Dutchman01's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2017
Posts: 214
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lemotan View Post
There are only two versions of Pentastar in this specific article "2010" is JK version and "2016" is JL version.
Since its Australian market it could be that they go by calendar year and not by "model tear" like in US, anyway its the same engine.
Ok. Thanks. Iím not an engineer but from what I read the jl version is better if only because itís lighter and uses fewer parts........right?
Dutchman01 is offline   Quote
Old 07-12-2019, 07:59 AM
Thread Starter
  #13
Jeeper
 
Dutchman01's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2017
Posts: 214
Quote:
Originally Posted by gobi_rubi View Post
It does under the "Pentastar Upgrade" section. The engine was updated in 16 but the updated version didn't make its way into Wranglers until the JLs were released.

For 2016, FCA released an updated version of the 3.6 L engine for the Jeep Grand Cherokee and Dodge Durango. This engine now featured two-stage variable valve lift (VVL), a cooled EGR, a new intake manifold, new fuel injectors, and new ignition coils. It also features upgrades to the variable valve timing (VVT) system, an increased compression ratio (11.3:1), lower internal friction and lower weight. These improvements help to increase power as well as efficiency.[10] The new version, however, has lost its flex-fuel capability.
Thanks for pointing that out.
Dutchman01 is offline   Quote
Old 07-12-2019, 08:02 AM
Thread Starter
  #14
Jeeper
 
Dutchman01's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2017
Posts: 214
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lemotan View Post
Its in the article, a lot of differences:
Cooled EGR valve
New valve train
New PCV
Smaller oil sump
Higher compression
ESS
JL Pentastar is a more complicated version with the same power output.
But lighter and with fewer parts. Iím guessing a better engine overall.
Dutchman01 is offline   Quote
Old 07-12-2019, 12:53 PM   #15
Jeeper
 
cdeslandes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: CT & VT
Posts: 2,804
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dutchman01 View Post
Ok. Thanks. Iím not an engineer but from what I read the jl version is better if only because itís lighter and uses fewer parts........right?
Better emissions control and possibly better gas mileage were probably the motivations behind the change.
__________________
2014 JK Unlimited Rubicon, Copperhead Pearl, minivan engine, 6 speed, Rock Krawler X-Factor 2.5" lift, Falcon shocks, 35" Dick Cepek M/T
My build: Copper Rubi build

Other rides: 2010 BMW Z4 35i, 2016 Volvo XC90
cdeslandes is offline   Quote
Old 07-12-2019, 01:23 PM   #16
Grooving With A Pict

5-Year WF Supporting Member
 
RhinoSportJKU's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: St. Louis
Posts: 1,909
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dutchman01 View Post
But lighter and with fewer parts. Iím guessing a better engine overall.
I think the cooled EGR and new PCV systems have yet to prove they are better.
FLEX B likes this.
RhinoSportJKU is offline   Quote
Old 07-12-2019, 01:57 PM   #17
Jeeper
 
Lemotan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2019
Location: California
Posts: 357
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dutchman01 View Post
But lighter and with fewer parts. Iím guessing a better engine overall.
On paper yes,
In reality they shaved metal from everywhere including crankshaft:
Crankshaft journal width: 68 mm (previously 72 mm); and,
Crank pin width: 54 mm (previously 59 mm).
Im not an engineer but 1/5 inch smaller crankshaft pins/journals doesn't look like they made it stronger.
Only time will show is it better or not.
Lemotan is offline   Quote
Old 07-12-2019, 02:06 PM   #18
Grooving With A Pict

5-Year WF Supporting Member
 
RhinoSportJKU's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: St. Louis
Posts: 1,909
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lemotan View Post
On paper yes,
In reality they shaved metal from everywhere including crankshaft:
Crankshaft journal width: 68 mm (previously 72 mm); and,
Crank pin width: 54 mm (previously 59 mm).
Im not an engineer but 1/5 inch smaller crankshaft pins/journals doesn't look like they made it stronger.
Only time will show is it better or not.
Yeah not enough information to say really. Less rotating mass (and less friction) is usually a good thing, but depending on if they adjusted the rod and main bearing clearances and/or made the bearings more robust only time will tell. With the tools available today like CFD and FEA and FEMA, everything is designed (and frankly a good deal of the "testing") via simulations on a computer. This has lead to many benefits obviously, but it's mostly theoretical and a best-case-scenario kind of thing. The real data comes via customers beating on their junk and the feedback from the dealer network. Then they can see where the all of the computer data fell short, and changes/improvements can be made. But only after many miserable owners have had to deal with the failures. Que sera, sera as they say.
RhinoSportJKU is offline   Quote
Old 07-12-2019, 02:07 PM   #19
Jeeper
 
YnotAJeep's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: La Verne, Calif.
Posts: 3,023
So were the changes made to have a better product for the consumer or to help the bottom line of FCA? Given the track record of FCA.
jadmt likes this.
__________________
2014 JKUR, Leather and everything inside, 4 inch OME springs, all Alpine arms, Adams front driveshaft, Falcon 2.1's, Adj track bars front and rear, heavy bumpers and winch, ICON rims and 315-70-17 BFG KO2's, ARB diff covers, ProComp LED's, 2 Bernese Mtn dogs.
Previously 2001 XJ lifted 5, SYE, True-tracks F & R.
CJ7, 304V8, auto, loaded, Detroit rear, and more.
90 Bronco,, 76 Bronco,, 70 Bronco
YnotAJeep is offline   Quote
Old 07-12-2019, 02:10 PM
Thread Starter
  #20
Jeeper
 
Dutchman01's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2017
Posts: 214
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lemotan View Post
On paper yes,
In reality they shaved metal from everywhere including crankshaft:
Crankshaft journal width: 68 mm (previously 72 mm); and,
Crank pin width: 54 mm (previously 59 mm).
Im not an engineer but 1/5 inch smaller crankshaft pins/journals doesn't look like they made it stronger.
Only time will show is it better or not.
Yeah. Time will tell.
Dutchman01 is offline   Quote
Old 07-12-2019, 02:30 PM   #21
Jeeper
 
invariant's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: San Marcos, CA
Posts: 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by RhinoSportJKU View Post
I think the cooled EGR and new PCV systems have yet to prove they are better.
EGR and PCV were the 2 major contributing factors to intake fouling in my old Mazda back in times. I'm happy I don't have to deal with EGR anymore.
__________________
'17 JK Recon, 6-spd.
BFG MT 35"; 2.5" Metalcloak springs and shocks; Currie control arms and front track bar; Clayton rear track bar bracket; RockHard4x4 skid plates; Teraflex HD tire carrier; ARB compressor.
invariant is online now   Quote
Old 07-12-2019, 02:35 PM   #22
Grooving With A Pict

5-Year WF Supporting Member
 
RhinoSportJKU's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: St. Louis
Posts: 1,909
Quote:
Originally Posted by invariant View Post
EGR and PCV were the 2 major contributing factors to intake fouling in my old Mazda back in times. I'm happy I don't have to deal with EGR anymore.
Yeah, I remember my CJ7 with the old 258 straight six. About every 6 months or so, I would keep the revs up and pour an entire 16 oz bottle of water down the carburetor to knock all the carbon out of the intake and combustion chambers. Man, did it kill mosquitoes too LOL. No one had heard of Seafoam back then.
tomthbomb likes this.
RhinoSportJKU is offline   Quote
Old 07-12-2019, 02:42 PM   #23
Jeeper
 
cdeslandes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: CT & VT
Posts: 2,804
Quote:
Originally Posted by RhinoSportJKU View Post
Yeah, I remember my CJ7 with the old 258 straight six. About every 6 months or so, I would keep the revs up and pour an entire 16 oz bottle of water down the carburetor to knock all the carbon out of the intake and combustion chambers. Man, did it kill mosquitoes too LOL. No one had heard of Seafoam back then.
I had a 1984 BMW 3 series, and the manual actually stated you should drive at high revs for a while after spending time stuck in traffic, to burn out the carbon deposits.
Lemotan likes this.
__________________
2014 JK Unlimited Rubicon, Copperhead Pearl, minivan engine, 6 speed, Rock Krawler X-Factor 2.5" lift, Falcon shocks, 35" Dick Cepek M/T
My build: Copper Rubi build

Other rides: 2010 BMW Z4 35i, 2016 Volvo XC90
cdeslandes is offline   Quote
Old 07-12-2019, 02:48 PM   #24
Grooving With A Pict

5-Year WF Supporting Member
 
RhinoSportJKU's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: St. Louis
Posts: 1,909
Quote:
Originally Posted by cdeslandes View Post
I had a 1984 BMW 3 series, and the manual actually stated you should drive at high revs for a while after spending time stuck in traffic, to burn out the carbon deposits.
That's known as "The Italian Tuneup."

Quote:
The origin of the Italian tuneup comes from Ferrari. Owners would drive their cars infrequently and never run them hard, which causes the engine to build up enough carbon inside to affect performance. Mechanics would perform a "tuneup" by driving several laps around a race track to get the engine hot enough to burn out the built up carbon. Cars before the advent of modern engine lubricants and fuels, often had a 'de-coke' by hand, after removing the cylinder head, as a scheduled service operation.
RhinoSportJKU is offline   Quote
Old 07-12-2019, 03:08 PM   #25
Jeeper
 
Lemotan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2019
Location: California
Posts: 357
Same here, had several issues with GM EGRs, Suzuki (made in Japan) was acting weird from day one throwing EGR related codes.
What I specifically don't like about JL EGR is the fact egr is cooling ex gases from 1202įF to 266įF, which means additional heat load for the cooling system.
They are now adding e-torque thing which also have a cooled battery - this will add even more coolant hoses and load on the cooling system.
IDK maybe JL have a larger radiator and a different engine temperature management but judging by their winning fans at stop lights I doubt.
Lemotan is offline   Quote
Old 07-12-2019, 03:12 PM   #26
Jeeper
 
Lemotan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2019
Location: California
Posts: 357
1989 E30 M20 325 same instructions.
I do "Italian tune up" on all my vehicles since then.
RhinoSportJKU likes this.
Lemotan is offline   Quote
Old 07-12-2019, 03:14 PM   #27
Grooving With A Pict

5-Year WF Supporting Member
 
RhinoSportJKU's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: St. Louis
Posts: 1,909
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lemotan View Post
Same here, had several issues with GM EGRs, Suzuki (made in Japan) was acting weird from day one throwing EGR related codes.
What I specifically don't like about JL EGR is the fact egr is cooling ex gases from 1202įF to 266įF, which means additional heat load for the cooling system.
They are now adding e-torque thing which also have a cooled battery - this will add even more coolant hoses and load on the cooling system.
IDK maybe JL have a larger radiator and a different engine temperature management but judging by their winning fans at stop lights I doubt.
Didn't realize it was that big of a delta. So how is the condensation being dealt with, which would have to occur with that big of a delta T? I would think possibly the NOX and condensate might produce some Nitric acid???? If so, that could be very bad.
RhinoSportJKU is offline   Quote
Old 07-12-2019, 03:19 PM   #28
Grooving With A Pict

5-Year WF Supporting Member
 
RhinoSportJKU's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: St. Louis
Posts: 1,909
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lemotan View Post
On paper yes,
In reality they shaved metal from everywhere including crankshaft:
Crankshaft journal width: 68 mm (previously 72 mm); and,
Crank pin width: 54 mm (previously 59 mm).
Im not an engineer but 1/5 inch smaller crankshaft pins/journals doesn't look like they made it stronger.
Only time will show is it better or not.
Holy Swiss Cheese Batman!

Quote:
The crankshaft main bearings and pins were trimmed, which contributed to an overall block-assembly weight reduction of 6 lbs (2.7 kg). This generates additional friction-reduction.
6 lbs from the main bearing and crank pins? Ok, nevermind, that was the overall weight reduction.
RhinoSportJKU is offline   Quote
Old 07-12-2019, 04:34 PM
Thread Starter
  #29
Jeeper
 
Dutchman01's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2017
Posts: 214
What is EGR?
Dutchman01 is offline   Quote
Old 07-12-2019, 04:49 PM   #30
Jeeper
 
Cummins_Powered's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: Sacramento, CA
Posts: 1,621
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dutchman01 View Post
What is EGR?
Exhaust Gas Recirculation

Cummins_Powered is offline   Quote
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off






All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:08 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.1
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging v3.1.0 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

Jeepģ, Wrangler, Liberty, Wagoneer, Cherokee, and Grand Cherokee are copyrighted and trademarked to Chrysler Motors LLC.
Wranglerforum.com is not in any way associated with the Chrysler Motors LLC