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I have a 2018 Jeep Wrangler Sport 2-door 4-cylinder turbo. I'm having an issue that I can't figure out. The Jeep has about a 2 second delay on the throttle when I push the gas pedal down. It's only noticeable when I'm moving. I have no issues from a dead stop. I put a full description of the behavior at the bottom of this message.

I know electric throttles have a delay. I expect it. This is not the old cable throttle system. However, none of the other cars I've owned ever had a delay like this.

I bought an iDrive hoping it would fix the issue. The iDrive works great, just as advertised, AFTER I'm past the throttle delay. It's a lot of fun to drive but does not address the initial throttle press delay issue.

This is also not the auto-stop/start function. The car is running and moving the whole time.

I brought the Jeep into the dealer to check the issue. They did a PCM software update but said they couldn't duplicate the issue (surprise, surprise...).

Has anyone else heard or or dealt with this? It really bugs me. All suggestions are appreciated.

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Here’s the step by step description of what happens –

1 - I’m driving at normal street speeds. I press the gas pedal to accelerate. I can count to two, 1-2, before anything significant happens. It sounds like the engine is winding up (although the tach doesn’t change) but no additional power is getting to the wheels. After a count of two, the power goes to the wheels and the car will accelerate. Depending how hard I was pushing the pedal, the Jeep will lurch forward or the acceleration may be gentle. It’s most noticeable when pushing down the pedal fairly far and fast to pass a car in a short space (not flooring it, just a good definitive push).

2 – The same scenario as above but this time I’m making a right-hand turn at a green light. This is where the issue is most troublesome. The car is moving the whole time. It never stopped. It never turned off. I press the gas, hear the engine rev up, count 1-2, then the car accelerates. This time though, I’m in a corner. When the car accelerates, the car will lurch when the real wheels start getting power and I have to keep the car from trying to fishtail (I never let it get bad enough to lose control.)

Thoughts?
 

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Sounds more like a transmission or transmission computer issue. One thing you could try is disconnecting the battery for a few minutes.
 

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If that is not an intermittent issue I can't see how the dealer says " unable to duplicate" 2 seconds is a significant delay.
There's an issue causing it has to be addressed.
Products like pedal commander negates throttle lag but not intended to fix a problem.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks guys. I didn't realize the new systems in the Jeep actually learned how you drive. I'll try disconnecting the battery then retrain the throttle procedure. Maybe I was too conservative driving when I first got the Jeep
 

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I've driven several 2.0 turbos, and also own one. I have never experienced what you are describing.

I agree with others, must need another 're-flash' by the dealer.

BTW, I broke in my new 2.0 "by the book" and babied it the first 500 miles.
 

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try goign about 15 mph then hit the gas. last one i drove had a 1-2 second delay before actually moving. Also did this on a 3.6. its annoying
 

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I have a 2018 Jeep Wrangler Sport 2-door 4-cylinder turbo. I'm having an issue that I can't figure out. The Jeep has about a 2 second delay on the throttle when I push the gas pedal down. It's only noticeable when I'm moving. I have no issues from a dead stop.

It's that well-known turbo lag. You don't feel it off the line because the eco-boost thingy is providing an assist. The scenarios you've described that have a noticeable lag I understand are situations where the eco-boost will not engage to hide the turbo lag.
 

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It's that well-known turbo lag. You don't feel it off the line because the eco-boost thingy is providing an assist. The scenarios you've described that have a noticeable lag I understand are situations where the eco-boost will not engage to hide the turbo lag.
Wrong. They shouldn't have that kind of significant delay on throttle input at any point. Two seconds?. Mine doesn't. Something else is at play here.
 

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This, and "relearn throttle procedure".
That would be the first thing I try. If that doesn't work bring it back to the dealer and have them troubleshoot it.
 

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I have a 2018 Jeep Wrangler Sport 2-door 4-cylinder turbo. I'm having an issue that I can't figure out. The Jeep has about a 2 second delay on the throttle when I push the gas pedal down. It's only noticeable when I'm moving. I have no issues from a dead stop. I put a full description of the behavior at the bottom of this message.

I know electric throttles have a delay. I expect it. This is not the old cable throttle system. However, none of the other cars I've owned ever had a delay like this.

I bought an iDrive hoping it would fix the issue. The iDrive works great, just as advertised, AFTER I'm past the throttle delay. It's a lot of fun to drive but does not address the initial throttle press delay issue.

This is also not the auto-stop/start function. The car is running and moving the whole time.

I brought the Jeep into the dealer to check the issue. They did a PCM software update but said they couldn't duplicate the issue (surprise, surprise...).

Has anyone else heard or or dealt with this? It really bugs me. All suggestions are appreciated.

------------------
Here’s the step by step description of what happens –

1 - I’m driving at normal street speeds. I press the gas pedal to accelerate. I can count to two, 1-2, before anything significant happens. It sounds like the engine is winding up (although the tach doesn’t change) but no additional power is getting to the wheels. After a count of two, the power goes to the wheels and the car will accelerate. Depending how hard I was pushing the pedal, the Jeep will lurch forward or the acceleration may be gentle. It’s most noticeable when pushing down the pedal fairly far and fast to pass a car in a short space (not flooring it, just a good definitive push).

2 – The same scenario as above but this time I’m making a right-hand turn at a green light. This is where the issue is most troublesome. The car is moving the whole time. It never stopped. It never turned off. I press the gas, hear the engine rev up, count 1-2, then the car accelerates. This time though, I’m in a corner. When the car accelerates, the car will lurch when the real wheels start getting power and I have to keep the car from trying to fishtail (I never let it get bad enough to lose control.)

Thoughts?

The same thing happens with my 2.0 as well.........occasionally. I think it is the turbo-lag, because my f250 diesel will do the same thing. However, I have noticed that when I turn off the auto start-stop it doesn't seem to do it as often. Overall, I think the Jeep works better when the auto start-stop feature is turned off.
 

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It's that well-known turbo lag. You don't feel it off the line because the eco-boost thingy is providing an assist. The scenarios you've described that have a noticeable lag I understand are situations where the eco-boost will not engage to hide the turbo lag.
I have had and lived with four different turbos and I know exactly what turbo lag feels like. Trust me, this engine has very little if any turbo lag. The only thing I've noticed is that the throttle is retarded when you take off with the steering turned, like in a tight corner, and I'm sure that's caused by the traction control system. It's def noticeable and goes away if you shut the TC off.

If the OP is experiencing a delay in throttle response in a straight line, something is wrong.
 

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The dealership has already determined that the OP's vehicle is functioning as designed, so now we see the fashion statements from the turbo fans.


Fuelly data has already verified that small turbos have lower real-world fuel economy than right-sized naturally aspirated engines. As a result, small turbos are nothing more than a scam to game the EPA ratings at the expense of real-world fuel economy.


Putting aside that the turbo fans are placing their fashion statements ahead of real-world fuel economy, they then have to mis-read the OP's observations so they can "respond" to something other than what the OP's asking about.
 
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