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Discussion Starter #1
So I'm new to jeeps and bought my first one about four months ago now. It has a few aftermarket suspension parts, looks like all skyjacker stuff. But according to a dealer nothing in the suspension is giving a lift. It only has a 3 inch body lift.

I've read plenty of the warnings of that big of a body lift in all the forms on here but my question is…. Is the 3 inch body lift making my ride a lot more rough? I know jeeps are always a rougher ride but mine seems really rough. I've ridden in jeeps in the past but so long ago I don't really remember how the ride was.
 

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So I'm new to jeeps and bought my first one about four months ago now. It has a few aftermarket suspension parts, looks like all skyjacker stuff. But according to a dealer nothing in the suspension is giving a lift. It only has a 3 inch body lift.

I've read plenty of the warnings of that big of a body lift in all the forms on here but my question is…. Is the 3 inch body lift making my ride a lot more rough? I know jeeps are always a rougher ride but mine seems really rough. I've ridden in jeeps in the past but so long ago I don't really remember how the ride was.
The body lift shouldn't effect your ride quality. It increase your center of gravity of course, but Shocks will effect your ride quality the most. If yours are especially stiff or possibly worn out, replacing them with new shocks that are valved according to your springs and the weight of your rig will help improve ride quality a bunch! Let me know what questions you have!

-Ryan
 

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Was really hoping it was just the tire pressure! But going off the stock requirements in the doorjamb, which said 29 pounds, all four tires were around 3 pounds low so I bumped them all up to 29 pounds. Guess I'll look into the shocks next! Thanks for the help!
 

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Was really hoping it was just the tire pressure! But going off the stock requirements in the doorjamb, which said 29 pounds, all four tires were around 3 pounds low so I bumped them all up to 29 pounds. Guess I'll look into the shocks next! Thanks for the help!
that is for the stock tires.. you have aftermarket.. look on the side wall of the tire for the max cold psi.. then adjust it from there.. street psi should be approximately no lower than 10psi of that number...
 

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That is incorrect. Load range C max pressure on the size tires we use is usually 50 psi. A load range E is even higher. Max -10 is way too high.

Stock tires, use the info in the door jamb, Bigger rubber, start working your way down.
 

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that is for the stock tires.. you have aftermarket.. look on the side wall of the tire for the max cold psi.. then adjust it from there.. street psi should be approximately no lower than 10psi of that number...
Sorry but you don't know what your talking about.
 

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Yeah, don't ever go with max cold psi. I run 26-28 on the street with 31x10.5's.

The absolute best way to find air pressure for your tires on the street is with an infrared temperature gun. Getting it close with other methods or doing "the chalk test" will work too though.
 

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Ok, lets put this debate to bed, there is only one correct way to determine YOUR CORRECT TIRE PRESSURE ! ! !

Your Jeep is different, it's weight, it's stance, it's ride, all of it, from any other Jeep, the pressure that works for one will not work for you.

First, go out and drive your Jeep about 5-10 miles, get up to at least 45-50 mph a few times, get the tires nice and medium range warm.

Second, use chalk, or a little carefully applied rolled on paint (like left over house paint is fine) and apply a line from side to side across the tread. Be careful you dont get paint on your wheels, suspension or body or what have you, any type or color will do.

Third, let it get a little tacky, dry doesn't matter but you don't want splatter (unless your using chalk, that's really the better way, but not everyone has access to it). Now drive down your block, it should be a flat street, or stay on the very crown as much as possible, you don't have to go far, a block will do (less for chalk).

Fourth, look at the markings you put on the tire, if the chalk is still really heavy in the center, your pressure is too low, if it's still very visible on the sides, you have too much pressure, adjust and repeat.

Tire air pressure will change with hot and cold, so, driving short or long distances, or weather (like here in Wyoming we go from 100 degrees to -35 degrees) will change the pressure and the required pressure to get a good track, don't spend your life chasing the pressure, a nice spring day, like now, and a few miles driving is going to give you a great median number to stick to.

We are running tires that are 11 to 13 to 14 inches wide, the 'rating' and 'max psi' are for a vehicle MUCH heavier than yours, remember your Jeep weighs about as much as a Kia Cee'd and your tires were made to work on a one ton truck.

Now that's out of the way, shocks are what your wanting to replace, but again, you can't just go to a parts store and get stock shocks, you'll have to do a little measuring, if you go to a quality parts store and tell him how long the shocks you have now are, and how much travel you have (thats from the top or bottom of the shock body to the bolt at the skinny end of the shock), they will set you up with the right shocks.
 
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