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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys, I'm new here...so hello all! :beerdrinking:
I have a 2011 JKU Sahara with a 2.5" lift, flat fenders, and I'm looking at either 35" Toyo M/T's or 37" Toyo R/T's.
I heard the R/T's were light compared to the the M/T's so I inquired with Toyo to find out....the 35/12.5/17 M/T's weigh 83 pounds, the 37/13.5/17 R/T's weigh 84 pounds. With a 1 pound difference from the two I'd like to go with the 37's, but I'm unsure of the consequences going this route since it's basically the same weight.
I see all the threads saying everything wears out quicker the bigger you go, but would this be the case when deciding between these two tires? Is my drivetrain going to suffer anymore going with the 37's as opposed to the 35's? If it is, why? Isn't the weight what's going to dictate how much excessive wear happens....or am I missing something?

Thanks for any input, and if this has already been discussed in another thread, please point me that way.

-Ryan
 

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The lager diameter of the larger tire will add more leverage to the drivetrain and suspension, causing more wear. Imagine your hand on a wrench with a stuck bolt or a pry bar, then getting a longer wrench to add more twisting force, or longer pry bar to move something. How much faster the wear is greatly depends on how it is driven and maintained.

Weight surely plays a role too, but with this minimal difference you will see the differences due to the different diameters as opposed to the weight.


Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the example. So it sounds like I'd still have about the same wear and tear because of the size difference, and the weight isn't as much of a factor as I thought? That stinks...was really hoping for 37's without all the wear and tear pains lol.
 

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The lager diameter of the larger tire will add more leverage to the drivetrain and suspension, causing more wear. Imagine your hand on a wrench with a stuck bolt or a pry bar, then getting a longer wrench to add more twisting force, or longer pry bar to move something. How much faster the wear is greatly depends on how it is driven and maintained. Weight surely plays a role too, but with this minimal difference you will see the differences due to the different diameters as opposed to the weight. Mike
Really solid response, thanks Mike!
 

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The increase is dynamic. As mike describes the increased torque due to diameter.

Consider torque forces to drive (spin) larger tires and steer (push/pull) larger tires.

Then consider the resistive loads that come from controlling larger tires both in spin and side to side forces. (Braking, pot holes, ruts, etc)

Add to that the weight is moved farther out only exasperating the dynamics.

That being said - I'd totally run the 37's and just be prepared for future upgrades.
 
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