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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone feel like their 4 wheel drive sort of wobbles when they take tight turns like trying to turn into a parking space? Mine feels like it's wobbling and stops the car from going for a second and stuff like that. Kind of hard to explain
 

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Car? What is this car you speak of? Did you buy the Jeep brand new or used?

To me it sounds like the activities of an auto/lunchbox locker. They have been known to ratchet and grind. Another question. Why are you in parking lots in 4x4 or parking in 4x4?

-Dan
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
2012 Wrangler Unlimited Sport. I bought it used from a dealer. It's lifted with bigger tires and Fox Shocks..... Am I not supposed to be using 4 wheel drive when I'm parking?
 

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. Another question. Why are you in parking lots in 4x4 or parking in 4x4? -Dan
This right here... You should not be in 4wd on any paved surface unless in snow or something like that. Don't need it in the dirt unless you have a lack of traction, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I live in Connecticut. We've been hit with more than 3 feet of snow in the past month and get hit just about every week. There's icy patches and small patches of frozen snow just about everywhere
 

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Try taking it out of 4wd and turning tight, it's probably just getting enough traction to where it's binding, I've noticed it as well on ice trying to go up the hill and turn into my garage if there is a little gravel on the top of the ice and it's not allowing the tires to slip enough.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
It's kind of hard some days to go without 4 wheel cuz I'll drive 2 wheel fine for most of the drive, then some parts have like 2 inch high ice patches to the point that I should be using 4 wheel. But I think I noticed the wobbling to happen when there's barely any slick terrain while I'm taking a sharp turn with the 4 wheel on
 

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Think of it like this, when engaged in 4x4, your front tires are meant to spin in unison, basically being locked into place with each other. When you take a turn, the inside tire travels a lot shorter distance than the outside wheel will. Typically, this would not be a problem of you were not on pavement because the outside tire would be able to spin freely to "catch up" with the inside tire. This is not so on pavement when there is high traction. When you go to take the turn, you are putting a lot of pressure on your front diffs causing the outside tire to catch up and sort of skip over the ground. This is the pressure that is stopping your jeep and making it hard to turn. There is nothing wrong with your jeep. If this is a continuing problem, just learn to take it out of 4x4 when making sharp turns if it's absolutely necessary to have the 4x4 engaged.
 

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I have a 2015 wrangler sport unlimited and it does the exact same thing you describe. If I'm a surface thtat needs the 4WD it's fine (snow for me) but once I hit clear road or when I pull out of my garage and the driveways snow is gone it happens. I look at it as a reminder that I don't need the 4wd on anymore.
 

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Think of it like this, when engaged in 4x4, your front tires are meant to spin in unison, basically being locked into place with each other. When you take a turn, the inside tire travels a lot shorter distance than the outside wheel will. Typically, this would not be a problem of you were not on pavement because the outside tire would be able to spin freely to "catch up" with the inside tire. This is not so on pavement when there is high traction. When you go to take the turn, you are putting a lot of pressure on your front diffs causing the outside tire to catch up and sort of skip over the ground. This is the pressure that is stopping your jeep and making it hard to turn. There is nothing wrong with your jeep. If this is a continuing problem, just learn to take it out of 4x4 when making sharp turns if it's absolutely necessary to have the 4x4 engaged.
Kind of.

But with open diffs, isn't the bind caused by different front to back rotation due to the transfer case being engaged front and rear?
 

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Shift into 4X4 ONLY when needed, which should be rarely. If you need the extra traction fine, but as soon as you get to the point you don't need it shift back to 4X2. You will break something, if you already haven't, by attempting to do what you are doing.

True 4X4 differs from AWD, which will allow all 4 wheels to turn at different speeds. It is really a better system for patchy ice/snow. Your Jeeps 4X4 system is far better in extreme conditions and tries to turn all 4 wheels at the same speed. On pavement where there is good traction something has to give when cornering. Hopefully not the transfer case or transmission.
 

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Kind of. But with open diffs, isn't the bind caused by different front to back rotation due to the transfer case being engaged front and rear?
I know that's not exactly it but I was just trying to explain in broad terms, "locked" wasn't referring to the diffs really being locked, just engaged if that makes sense. But from my understanding the bind as I described
 

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You should not need 4WD to turn into a parking space. Take it out of 4WD in those situations.
 

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The bind occurs because the front wheels, combined, travel farther than the rear wheels. The differentials allow the wheels on each of the axles to turn at different speeds, but the transfer case does not allow the front drive shaft to turn at a different speed than the rear drive shaft, when locked in 4WD. Since the front wheels travel farther than the rear wheels, and are locked to the rear at the transfer case, the tires must slip on the ground to make up the difference.

Contrary to popular belief, this slipping, or binding, will not break anything. it just causes odd steering and tire wear. Try to avoid it, but don't worry that you have damaged anything.

It's too bad that Jeep doesn't put a "full time" option in the Wrangler, like they do on other models. These have a center differential or viscous coupling that allows for 4WD on dry pavement by allowing the front and rear drive shafts to turn at different speeds while in 4WD.
 

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Contrary to popular belief, this slipping, or binding, will not break anything. it just causes odd steering and tire wear. Try to avoid it, but don't worry that you have damaged anything.
The OP has a D30 front with a lift and larger tires. Are you willing to put your wallet where your mouth is? Sharp turns in 4WD on pavement with larger tires and a D30...yeah, that's not a disaster waiting to happen at all.

I wish people would stop with this "4WD on pavement won't break anything" nonsense. It may not happen right away, it may not happen the first time or fifth time, but unless you like playing Russian Roulette I suggest you don't try your luck. I've seen people break with 4WD on pavement with my own two eyes. It's not some myth.
 

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It won't break anything.

Show us some examples of breakage caused simply by being in 4WD on dry pavement. Fortunately, Wranglers are not that fragile.

It's not a good practice to answer somebody's question about their poor handling Jeep by telling them they are going to have all these problems or broken parts simply because they didn't realize they should not be in 4WD on pavement. There's no need to deliberately scare someone with false information like that. Or, you could show us the vast pile of broken parts that must have resulted, and then refer them to the pile as proof of what they have done.

I'm sure there are exceptions, but come on........Since he's already done it, and done it long enough to wonder about the handling and post about it, and nothing broke...........Hmmm. Guaranteed breakage? No.
 

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It won't break anything.

I wish people would stop telling others not to use there 4 wheel drive when they need it.
I am not saying that using it on dry pavement is good but it is better to use it when you could need it than crash because you were afraid to use it.
To avoid the condition the OP was referring to simply disengage 4 wheel drive before parking.
This would apply to the car in question and a Jeep if the Op has one. (sorry I couldn't let that slide)
 

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It won't break anything.

Show us some examples of breakage caused simply by being in 4WD on dry pavement. Fortunately, Wranglers are not that fragile.
Should I give you peoples phone numbers so they can tell you about it or what? It can and will happen with stock driveshafts. I have seen it happen on wet pavement. I personally drove an hour and a half to help out one of my idiot friends who thought torrential rain meant use 4wd. This was in 2013, on a jeep with 3000 miles.

with aftermarket driveshafts, by all means, go for it. but if you want a t-case skidplate full of Rzeppa bearings....
 

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It won't break anything.

I wish people would stop telling others not to use there 4 wheel drive when they need it.
I am not saying that using it on dry pavement is good but it is better to use it when you could need it than crash because you were afraid to use it.
To avoid the condition the OP was referring to simply disengage 4 wheel drive before parking.
This would apply to the car in question and a Jeep if the Op has one. (sorry I couldn't let that slide)
using 4wd will do nothing but make an accident more likely on wet or dry roads. it will affect steering, induce torque steer, and there is zero brake proportioning in 4wd.
 

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It won't break anything.
Famous last words. Like I said, I witnessed this first-hand with a friend's Jeep. D30 front, 33" tires. He was playing in a dirt parking lot, ventured out onto the street to make a u-turn without going into 2wd. Snap. He felt like an idiot.

Stop assuming this is an absolute won't happen. It DOES happen.

Show us some examples of breakage caused simply by being in 4WD on dry pavement. Fortunately, Wranglers are not that fragile.
Has nothing to do with being a Wrangler and everything to do with friction and stored energy.

You wanted an example, here's an example. This one is on the extreme end of what can happen and the circumstances, but you wanted an example.

Driveline bind, binding hubs, axle wind up, axle bind, drive line wind up - all terms for one thing: stress due to part time 4 wheel drive

It's not a good practice to answer somebody's question about their poor handling Jeep by telling them they are going to have all these problems or broken parts simply because they didn't realize they should not be in 4WD on pavement.
It's not good practice to tell people doing something that they shouldn't is safe when it's not. You're telling this guy that doesn't know how 4WD works that doing what he's doing won't hurt anything when physics and the fact that he can FEEL the Jeep NOT want to move tells him something isn't right. Telling them to just ignore that resistance and drive on without worrying about breaking anything is completely wrong and irresponsible. I never said people are going to always end up with broken parts just by doing it once, either. I even said that very thing in my last post. However, there are only some many times that parts are going to take excess stress before fatiguing to the point where they break.

There's no need to deliberately scare someone with false information like that. Or, you could show us the vast pile of broken parts that must have resulted, and then refer them to the pile as proof of what they have done.
I'm sorry if the facts scare some people, but what you're doing is spreading misinformation and being irresponsible. Unless you're willing to accept responsibility for everyone that listens to your "advice" who ends up breaking something I suggest you stop with this ridiculousness.

I'm sure there are exceptions, but come on........Since he's already done it, and done it long enough to wonder about the handling and post about it, and nothing broke...........Hmmm. Guaranteed breakage? No.
It's amazing how somehow you read "guaranteed breakage" anywhere in any of my posts. Stop twisting my words simply because you are unable to accept that you're giving out bad advice and information. Seriously.

It won't break anything.

I wish people would stop telling others not to use there 4 wheel drive when they need it.
I am not saying that using it on dry pavement is good but it is better to use it when you could need it than crash because you were afraid to use it.
I highly doubt the OP would've crashed when pulling into a parking space in 2WD and in fact using 4WD when not needed is MORE likely to result in wrecking because of how handling and steering are affected. Obviously it wasn't needed if the drivetrain was binding. The OP is learning when and when not to use their 4WD and that's fine, but this bad advice of telling people it's ok and nothing will ever break by using 4WD on pavement is ridiculous.

To avoid the condition the OP was referring to simply disengage 4 wheel drive before parking.
This would apply to the car in question and a Jeep if the Op has one. (sorry I couldn't let that slide)
Yes, and what we're trying to explain is not only that the proper thing to do was be in 2WD at that point but why extended use of 4WD when it's not necessary can and will cause excessive wear and eventual parts failure over time.

It's not rocket science, people. It's just physics.
 
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